#1
Title says it all. I've asked around local shops about what kind of setup I should get, and I've had widely varying answers. One guy told me to look for a 4-track cassette recording system because they would be the cheapest and cassettes are cheap too. problem is, I really really like having an audio control program on the computer to give me more options. Another guy suggested a Tascam or M-Audio system, which is good to get a name brand to peg, but there's literally over a hundred different systems to choose from.

Here's my criteria:

-I only need to record 4-5 different tracks, separately if possible. The thing is, I play bass, guitar and keys, and my girlfriend plays drums. So I want to record those 3-4 parts myself separately, but I can play any of them with my girl on drums.

-I don't wanna spend more than 200 bucks, and only 200 if I have to to get what I'm looking for.

-I'd like it to work with my computer, possibly come with software, but not mandatory. I can always browse for a good free music program.

Any help you folks could offer would be greatly appreciated. I've been wanting to record for a while now and always get discouraged because I don't know what the hell I'm doing.
Clamdigger of the Bass Militia, PM Dinkydaisy to join
Some say a comet will fall from the sky...
#2
The cheapest thing you can do is to get yourself a copy of Cubase, then learn it, then get a jack to mini jack plug and record using that. It'll take a while to learn mind. You can do the drums electronically by downloading samples off the internet. =]

This is actually really effective and cheap. My band does this and it saves us a fortune. www.myspace.com/welike8balls < everything on there was done using just cubase and add-ons.
Bass:
Aria Pro II SB-900 (wa)
100W Stinger Bass Amp
#3
At $200 max, you're going to have a lot trouble finding what you're looking for. I know you'd like to edit on the computer, but you may have to just go with the cassette recorder. If need be, you could always just record all your tracks on that and then send those to the computer for editing.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#4
Quote by mafyoo
The cheapest thing you can do is to get yourself a copy of Cubase, then learn it, then get a jack to mini jack plug and record using that. It'll take a while to learn mind. You can do the drums electronically by downloading samples off the internet. =]

This is actually really effective and cheap. My band does this and it saves us a fortune. www.myspace.com/welike8balls < everything on there was done using just cubase and add-ons.

i did exactly that, but whatever i played had a second delay which i couldnt get rid of, and it sounded like there was no bass in there whatever.

I wish i could figure it out! My friend can do it an make it sound amazing, but he has a mixer - dunno wether it was that tha made the difference though...
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#5
Quote by gary666
i did exactly that, but whatever i played had a second delay which i couldnt get rid of, and it sounded like there was no bass in there whatever.

I wish i could figure it out! My friend can do it an make it sound amazing, but he has a mixer - dunno wether it was that tha made the difference though...


Yeah I theres a million settings in their so theres probably something that would sort that out =/ And you have to eq the bass to hell xD But that's all part of mixing anyway. (You mix using the computer, you don't need an actual mixer)
Bass:
Aria Pro II SB-900 (wa)
100W Stinger Bass Amp
#6
With a budget so small, you're definitely going to have problems recording drums. The best approach you could afford is probably one mic covering all the drums, when you really want at least 4 ideally. Are you willing to add drums electronically ?

Your only real option is to go for a small USB based setup. An interface such as the M-Audio Fast Track is a good starting point, or if you spend a little more, you can get a USB 2.0 interface such as the Tascam US122 or the EMU 0202. For a microphone, you could go with a Shure sm57, which is a classic mic that is still used in many pro studios. However, that mic won't do too good at recording the drumkit (not that any will with just a single mic).

I wouldn't go with the cassette recorder though. Cassettes are pretty much obsolete, they are fragile and prone to damage, and editing your songs won't be possible, apart from maybe if you export individual tracks to your computer, but that won't be the simplest thing, or have the best quality. The only time I'd go with an analogue setup is if I were using actual reel to reel tape.
There is poetry in despair.
#7
the whole system still seems so insanely foreign to me, whenever I read a review or explanation for a product, it's all in a bunch of jargon I can't even begin to comprehend. My old band had a soundboard that run a regular friggen' instrument cable into the board, and from the board into their computer with a USB. From there they had a computer program that let them have a huge amount of control over individual tracks. How they recorded the drums however, is a mystery to me. i came in to record with the guitarist and the drums were recorded separately. Do I need to just mic the drums and do the same procedure? Is this approach logical or cost effective?

edit:

I'm strongly considering this system here.

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Line-6-UX2-with-PF?sku=250004

It seems to come out of the box with a lot to offer, but my drum recording problem is still there. Only thing I can think to do is use a single mic ( ) to record her part and plug it into the 2nd guitar input.
Clamdigger of the Bass Militia, PM Dinkydaisy to join
Some say a comet will fall from the sky...
Last edited by Ingsoc at Jan 13, 2009,