#1
Do you think it was good for me to purcharse a MT2 from BOSS even if i own a spider III 15 amp? I still cant get some good settings, i can only feel the pedals distortion when im in the clean channel... if i change to insane channel its almost like if the pedal isnt turned on
IF the problems are in the settings, could anyone tell me some good settings then?
#2
Generally pedals don't work well with modeling amps. I'd keep it though, because most likely you will get something better in the future right?
#3
^ what gymbo said.. modelling amps + pedals are bad combinations.. i'd say return the pedal and save up for a better amp
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#4
most super high gain pedals are used on the clean channel, to get super high gain sounds. with a super high gain setting on the amp, the pedal doesnt do a whole lot.

but yeah, modelling amps dont take pedals that well...
#7
Sell the Spider and get a practice tube amp. They have great cleans and will sound way better with your metalzone.

EDIT: the EHX Metal Muff is only $90 and slaughters the Metalzone.
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Last edited by wildwildwes594 at Jan 13, 2009,
#8
That's not a really good sounding pedal, I made the mistake of getting it, but it sorta sounds crappy and thin, not well defined. If you need higher gain than you're getting out of the spider, you probably need to look into other amps first. If you want to stick with modeling, I'd go with a Vox Valvetronix, best modeling amp I've heard and probably still in your price range.

The Metalzone won't really sound good into a solid-state amp, no matter what, from what other people have told me - I think it's only worth keeping if you're going to run it into a single-channel tube amp. But I actually find the DS-1 a lot better sounding, and it's way cheap (like $25-35 used, $40 new?) - it's sorta made to sound like a classic Marshall lead distortion tone in a pedal.
#9
Quote by TunaFish
i got a frontman 10g with mt-2 and its sounds like a charm.

god, i really doubt that.

Threadstarter, could you return both and get a peavey vypyr? will give you way better tones
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#10
Quote by Robino_Ibanez
god, i really doubt that.

Threadstarter, could you return both and get a peavey vypyr? will give you way better tones

hey its for practicing but still it still sounds pretty good.
#11
It is possible to improve the sound of the Spider with a pedal. I used to set the Spider to the first Blues position with the gain all the way down on the amp. But you would be better off either spending the money on a better modeling amp, like a Roland Cube or Peavey Vyper, or getting a good tube amp and pairing it with the distortion pedal of your choice.
#12
Spiders and pedals, as mentioned, don't usually like each other... and the Metal Zone is a pedal that is hard to get a nice sound out of at the best of times.

My advice would be to try and sell both and upgrade to either a better modelling amp like the two rhettro mentioned, or get a small tube combo and either an EHX Metal Muff, BOSS ML2 (that's the Metal Core, not Metal Zone) or even a good OD such as a Tubescreamer, Bad Monkey or a BOSS SD1.
#13
I agree with getting a different amp. The MT-2 is a great pedal if you like tons of gain. It takes some time to dial in the exact sound you want. I happen to enjoy the pedal.
#14
Here's a very simplified explanation of how modelling amps work vs conventional amps.

Coventional tube/ss amp:
Signal comes from guitar and hits various components that will modify that signal, both amplifying it and most likely distorting it in some way. If you run a pedal in front of it then the effect the pedal has will combine with whatever the amp is doing...granted it doesn't always work too well on SS amps.

Modelling amp:
Signal comes from guitar and hits amp modelling gubbins whose job is pretty much "make THIS sound from whatever signal you get". Put a pedal in front of it ands the modelling circuitry will try to negate the effect of any pedal you put in front of it in an attempt to make the sound it's been told to...you tend to just end up with whatever sound the amp was supposed to make but with some nasty signal corruption and extraneous noise in there.
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#15
Quote by steven seagull
Here's a very simplified explanation of how modelling amps work vs conventional amps.

Coventional tube/ss amp:
Signal comes from guitar and hits various components that will modify that signal, both amplifying it and most likely distorting it in some way. If you run a pedal in front of it then the effect the pedal has will combine with whatever the amp is doing...granted it doesn't always work too well on SS amps.

Modelling amp:
Signal comes from guitar and hits amp modelling gubbins whose job is pretty much "make THIS sound from whatever signal you get". Put a pedal in front of it ands the modelling circuitry will try to negate the effect of any pedal you put in front of it in an attempt to make the sound it's been told to...you tend to just end up with whatever sound the amp was supposed to make but with some nasty signal corruption and extraneous noise in there.



This is basically it but I have found that different guitars will sound different through modelling amps, I noticed the difference between my Dad's guitars and mine through my (now sold) VOXAD30VT and my Roland Micro Cube RX through all channels and comparing the BOSS MT-2 with the Digitech Metal Master pedals through the same amps/guitars, the sound did differ quite a bit but it definitely wouldn't be worth the money for the subtle change in tone.
#16
Quote by steven seagull


Modelling amp:
Signal comes from guitar and hits amp modelling gubbins whose job is pretty much "make THIS sound from whatever signal you get". Put a pedal in front of it ands the modelling circuitry will try to negate the effect of any pedal you put in front of it in an attempt to make the sound it's been told to...


Not exactly. There isn't a single tone that the modeling amp is trying to reproduce, rather the modeling amp takes the signal and modifies it based on a digital "model" of the amp it is trying to reproduce. Thus a dirty signal gets modified the same way a clean one would. But because the digital modeling is an approximation of the actual amp, the tone can get a little coarse.
Last edited by rhettro at Jan 14, 2009,
#17
I think you should get the MT-2..i use it at band rehearsal with a 75 watt Spider 3 ..and i always keep my amp on clean channel and just use the pedal for distortion...and the distortion (if you find the right settings) SOUND AMAZING..like..it gives a REALLY powerful punch (i'm using a Schecter 7-string hellraiser)...so yeah..go for it and get the Metal zone
#18
Quote by Themiddleman667
I think you should get the MT-2..i use it at band rehearsal with a 75 watt Spider 3 ..and i always keep my amp on clean channel and just use the pedal for distortion...and the distortion (if you find the right settings) SOUND AMAZING..like..it gives a REALLY powerful punch (i'm using a Schecter 7-string hellraiser)...so yeah..go for it and get the Metal zone


Haha, yeah I bet it sounds crushing.

Bring back the pedal, sell the amp, save up some money and buy either a roland cube, vypyr or a small tube amp + distortion or OD depending on the amp.
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