#1
so iv been recording my acoustic songs, but im just wondering how to record REALL good sounding acoustic guitar.

this is what im doing so far.


cole clark fat lady 1 (flac1)======>

beringer mixing desk==========>

line in on acer laptop==========>

reaper===================>


would an interface make it sounds heaps better, or it that just mainly with electrics and junk.


also, any tips on eq-ing.

thanks heaps.
#3
nah man. the cole clark has a saddle pickup as well as a front soundboard microphones or some****.

sounds pretty good through a pa and ****.

would a mic help?
#4
Take your mic and laptop into the bathroom and play/record in there. Pretty good sound bouncing off the shower walls.
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Quote by rhcp_freak
If you're EQ'd loose, you'll sound loose anyway.
#5
Yeah, it sounds so much better with a mic.
I was reading a bit of info, and apparently condenser mics are the way to go.
Check out the Shure SM81LC

And like occub said, just try recording in different rooms for different sounds.
Have fun man, what are you thinking of recording?

*Edit*

They are pretty expensive though..
Last edited by daltoor at Jan 14, 2009,
#6
for a good acoustic guitar sound:
-a good condenser mic (Neumann U87 or Rode NT1A would be nice)
-good pre-amps
-good converters
-and to hear it all, a good set of monitors.

you'll need to ditch the behringer mixer and laptop soundcard, get an audio interface and a good mic. the miced sound will always be better than the saddle pickup.

if you get an interface with more than one input you could also record the saddle signal and blend it in with the mic signal to taste.
#7
Quote by TheDriller
for a good acoustic guitar sound:
-a good condenser mic (Neumann U87 or Rode NT1A would be nice)
-good pre-amps
-good converters
-and to hear it all, a good set of monitors.

you'll need to ditch the behringer mixer and laptop soundcard, get an audio interface and a good mic. the miced sound will always be better than the saddle pickup.

if you get an interface with more than one input you could also record the saddle signal and blend it in with the mic signal to taste.

The truth has been spoken. Also, if you only have one mic you could record one take with the mic down near the 12th fret and another take with the mic up near the 3rd fret and blend those two when you mix. One take will give you a nice bassy sound and the other will give you a trebly sound. Pan one track to the left and one track to the right. The more you seperate the two, the "bigger" the sound will be.
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#8
Quote by BigFatSandwich
The truth has been spoken. Also, if you only have one mic you could record one take with the mic down near the 12th fret and another take with the mic up near the 3rd fret and blend those two when you mix. One take will give you a nice bassy sound and the other will give you a trebly sound. Pan one track to the left and one track to the right. The more you seperate the two, the "bigger" the sound will be.


Hmm, sounds interesting. Double tracking is usually the way to go for big sounds, but on acoustic guitar? i dunno, i've never done it. the results would depend on context. if you were going for the gentle, "intimate" vibe then the two performances will probably kill that. however you would get a big fat sound to compensate
#9
Quote by TheDriller
for a good acoustic guitar sound:
-a good condenser mic (Neumann U87 or Rode NT1A would be nice)
-good pre-amps
-good converters
-and to hear it all, a good set of monitors.


Good advice, although most mid-priced condensors will do the job, but no one has mentioned the most important things: a well set-up, properly tuned guitar played well (with proper mic placement depending on what type of sound you want). That's where it all starts. The most beautiful recording techniques won't mask that.

Quote by TheDriller
Hmm, sounds interesting. Double tracking is usually the way to go for big sounds, but on acoustic guitar? i dunno, i've never done it. the results would depend on context. if you were going for the gentle, "intimate" vibe then the two performances will probably kill that. however you would get a big fat sound to compensate


It does work very well to double for some things. For your basic commercial-sounding rock/pop/country song then doubling the acoustics works well. Overall I think doubling works better on strumming than on arpeggiation but, in the end, a good player playing to a metronome/drum track can make doubling an arpeggiated figure work as well.

I wouldn't "double" in the way that BigFatSandwich described though (basically panning different mic placements of the same take) since that will make the EQ impression of the rack a bit lopsided.
Last edited by ebon00 at Jan 15, 2009,
#10
Quote by TheDriller
Hmm, sounds interesting. Double tracking is usually the way to go for big sounds, but on acoustic guitar? i dunno, i've never done it. the results would depend on context. if you were going for the gentle, "intimate" vibe then the two performances will probably kill that. however you would get a big fat sound to compensate

True. It's all dependent upon what you wanna do. I play acoustic guitar pretty much exclusively, so for some parts of some of the songs I record, I want the acoustic to be pretty big. For example, during a verse I may have a fingerpicked part panned slightly to the left, then during the chorus--bam! in come the drums, the bass, whatever else I want to add and acoustic strumming on the left and acoustic strumming on the right, panned according to how big I want the sound to be.

Also, try recording an acoustic part and then waaaay over-compressing it. It creates a really cool effect, in my opinion.

Quote by ebon00
I wouldn't "double" in the way that BigFatSandwich described though (basically panning different mic placements of the same take) since that will make the EQ impression of the rack a bit lopsided.

Good point. But with the equipment I'm using at the moment, I don't have much of a choice, really.
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Last edited by BigFatSandwich at Jan 15, 2009,
#11
Anyone here tried Quad-tracking acoustic guitars?
I've only ever done it for electrics,
#12
Quote by TheDriller
Anyone here tried Quad-tracking acoustic guitars?
I've only ever done it for electrics,


Actually, yes. I've quadruple-tracked a strumming part once: twice with the mic pointed at the bridge and twice with the mic pointed at the soundhole at an angle. I then panned each pair fairly wide (a bit too wide I'd say in retrospect) and added a slight bit of delay on one pair. It was a bit much really but might have turned out better had I worked more at sculpting each sound more with some EQ.
#13
Quote by ebon00
Actually, yes. I've quadruple-tracked a strumming part once: twice with the mic pointed at the bridge and twice with the mic pointed at the soundhole at an angle. I then panned each pair fairly wide (a bit too wide I'd say in retrospect) and added a slight bit of delay on one pair. It was a bit much really but might have turned out better had I worked more at sculpting each sound more with some EQ.


Is that 4 mics or 4 performances?
quad-tracking is 4 performances.
#14
Quote by HethaHORRIFIC
so iv been recording my acoustic songs, but im just wondering how to record REALL good sounding acoustic guitar.

would an interface make it sounds heaps better, or it that just mainly with electrics and junk.


also, any tips on eq-ing.

thanks heaps.


To get outstanding sounding audio takes time and skill. Good gear such as a basic interface will help quite a bit for starts but knowing how to EQ, compress, and place your mics will also help a lot when it comes to sound quality.

Go over Tweak's Guide in my sig.
#15
Quote by TheDriller
Is that 4 mics or 4 performances?
quad-tracking is 4 performances.


I understand the terminology. Since I only mention "the mic" in the post I thought it was obvious. Four takes with one microphone.
#16
okay, so heres the deal.

i got a whole lotta real nice condenser mics. four infact, all real good. (my dads a sound guy, and he had them in his van)

so now im gonna put some new strings on the cole clark, tune her up, and find out what sorta tone i can get.


im still using the beringer desk and lappy souncard for now.


any tips on mic placement?
#17
Quote by TheDriller
Hmm, sounds interesting. Double tracking is usually the way to go for big sounds, but on acoustic guitar? i dunno, i've never done it. the results would depend on context. if you were going for the gentle, "intimate" vibe then the two performances will probably kill that. however you would get a big fat sound to compensate


I do that all the time with my acoustic guitar music

Tony
#18
Quote by HethaHORRIFIC
okay, so heres the deal.

i got a whole lotta real nice condenser mics. four infact, all real good. (my dads a sound guy, and he had them in his van)

so now im gonna put some new strings on the cole clark, tune her up, and find out what sorta tone i can get.


im still using the beringer desk and lappy souncard for now.


any tips on mic placement?

*EARLY DISCLAIMER* I am not an expert on this. Take everything I say with a grain of salt. Ok, moving on...

What type of condenser mics are they (large or small) and what's their pickup pattern?
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#19
hmm, theres four, two are "cad" and the other two are "beyer dynamic".

dad said they beyer dynamic ones **** all over the cad ones, so im using them.

they only maybe model i can find on it is "opus 53"
#21
thats it! =)


so any good for recording acoustic guitar? and how should i position it, mix it, etc.


what am i doing with it. =)