#1
Ok I did a search and found nothing on this.

Anyway, lets say you want to do and DOWN/UP strum on a G or E. Pretty easy right. Just strum the six strings down and up.

But my question relates to the UP movement on a chord like C, D, F where you miss out some of the bass strings.

Lets take a D. If you strum down starting on the 4th string and then you want to strum up, I always try to do it in one motion, missing out the 5th and 6th top strings. (This is slow as I'm only learning)

Do others just take a swipe at it, while muting these strings with the thumb? As in not take care to only strike the first 4 strings? I would have thought it's good practice to make sure you only strike the first four, carefully and then build up speed?

This also applies when you only want to strike 3 strings on an A chord. Do you take time to meticulously strum these accurately or do you just mute and strum away...?

Hope this makes sense
#2
I normally just aim to miss them - if that makes sense - but I'm just learning too so what I do doesn't mean much :/
#3
Usually a combination of the two: muting strings with the left hand fingers (not thumb) and right hand wrist, and knowing where to move away from the guitar when strumming. Also, there are four strings in an A chord (middle four), just so you know
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#4
You'll eventually get used to only hitting the strings you want. When I first started, I didn't even know how to do power chords because you are only meant to hit 2/3 strings, but eventually I just got used to it. Just practise. In the meantime, you can mute the strings while aiming to miss them (if that makes sense ) and you can stop muting them when you have no need to do so anymore.
#5
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Usually a combination of the two: muting strings with the left hand fingers (not thumb) and right hand wrist, and knowing where to move away from the guitar when strumming. Also, there are four strings in an A chord (middle four), just so you know


Actually, there can be as many strings as you want (up to 6 on a standard guitar, obv.) in an A chord depending on the voicing, and if you're playing an 'open' A chord you would often play the high E as well (it's the octave 5th if your root is on the 5th string).

Anyway, on topic - I naturally developed the motion of missing strings I didn't want... I think generally everyone just manages to develop that because it's rare you would want to bring your thumb over the top of the neck apart from when adding substituted bass notes in.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Jan 14, 2009,
#6
Once you play enough you'll know when to lift off at the right moment and avoid hitting the lowest two strings for the D chord. After playing long enough you'll be able to navigate the guitar with your eyes closed.

For the C chord, depending on how you play C... use the finger that hits the base C to just touch the 6th string.

As for F, if you do a full barre you won't have any trouble with needing to hit the low string.
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#7
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Also, there are four strings in an A chord (middle four), just so you know


I know but some use just 3 strings, in certain songs, right? I'm pretty sure I've seen it
#8
Quote by Tkm
I know but some use just 3 strings, in certain songs, right? I'm pretty sure I've seen it

Yeah, but in that case it's not a whole chord. It's common to drop out a few notes when playing chords, but the actual A chord uses the first five strings.
#9
Quote by lockdown91
Yeah, but in that case it's not a whole chord. It's common to drop out a few notes when playing chords, but the actual A chord uses the first five strings.


Well, if you played the open A with just the fretted notes it would be the first inversion of the A major triad, so using just 3 strings is a full A major chord, but it sounds fuller if you begin with the root note as the A on the open 5th string, and add the high E so the final three notes are in the 'correct' order, thus giving you A E A C* E (by * I mean sharp, but I haven't found the 'hash' key on this Mac yet ).
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#10
It just takes practice. After doing it (a little slowly) at first you will develop the "muscle memory" to coordinate not hitting those strings. It takes a little time but it pays off. I think its easier to miss it than it is to try and mute them. Just like learning your cords and quickly moving your fingers to touch a small string that is only mm in length and press down on it at just the right pressure and hold it along with sometimes three other strings becomes part of your "muscle memory" and even reflex. Its just part of learning guitar. Takes time, but you will get used to it and be able to do it every time.
#11
Cool, so could anyone recommend some good strumming exercises or videos? I've just seen standard D^D^U^D (down down up down) to a regular beat. I want to maybe get some bass and high strings into the mix to make it sound like there's two guitars.

Like this video of Thom Yorke http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1nFB-R-_gI


He seems to start of with strumming the high strings then brings the lows in to create a bass at 0:15
Last edited by Tkm at Jan 15, 2009,
#12
What I used to practice strumming patterns is to learn some great acoustic songs. Check out John Frusciante's discography, especially the songs The Past Recedes, The First Season, Three Thoughts. They may be difficult at first, but everything is.

Just keep on practicing, you'll get there! Good luck mate!