#1
why do the 1st 2nd and 6th string go up a whole note on the first fret and the ones in between only go up half a step, was it planned (i'm guessing yes), and how is this possible? If anyone can answer this that would be cool, kinda confusing, not really necessary, but i'd really like to understand it. Thanks!
#3
Quote by AVIDFANOFSOUNDS
ya forgeting the sharps/flats


huh?
#6
Quote by tjhome28
Right... The Chromatic scale starting on C (i.e. with intervals of half a step in between notes)

C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C

Fret the first fret on any string, the pitch goes up half a step. So in the case of the 1st, 2nd and 6th strings, this is E --> F, B --> C and E --> F. On the other three: A --> A#, D --> D# and G --> G#. So it's no difference, just the letter names change.

Hope that helps.


Ah.. so there is no E# of F flat? B# or C flat? i feel like my whole child hood just got ripped in half, some where my music teacher skipped this... why did i never notice though is the funny part... i should have known there was something fishy when the black keys came in 2's then 3's

Essentially... F is E#? and C is B#? What is the point of this... why..

why not A A# B B# C C# D D# E E# F F#, and just forget there was a G? Was someone really attatched to the letter G when they invented, founded, this scale?
Last edited by jdc50 at Jan 14, 2009,
#7
Quote by tjhome28
Exactly


And yep, but if there was we would have 14 semitones in an octave. Which would mess up all of western music for the last... well a very long time. It's just the way it is, and we have to live with it.



This explains.. everything... i feel like crying now.... why!!!!

Why the hell didnt they just make it A A# B B# C C# D D# E E# F F#, here we still have 12 tones in the scale, but 6 letters, was someone really concerned about not getting the G in?
#8
Quote by jdc50
Ah.. so there is no E# of F flat? B# or C flat? i feel like my whole child hood just got ripped in half, some where my music teacher skipped this... why did i never notice though is the funny part... i should have known there was something fishy when the black keys came in 2's then 3's

Essentially... F is E#? and C is B#? What is the point of this... why..

why not A A# B B# C C# D D# E E# F F#, and just forget there was a G? Was someone really attatched to the letter G when they invented, founded, this scale?


It's based on the C major scale going CDEFGAB and the A minor going ABCDEFG.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#9
Quote by jdc50
why do the 1st 2nd and 6th string go up a whole note on the first fret and the ones in between only go up half a step, was it planned (i'm guessing yes), and how is this possible? If anyone can answer this that would be cool, kinda confusing, not really necessary, but i'd really like to understand it. Thanks!

The answer is

"It just does"

at some point the people making guitars decided that was the best way to arrange the strings because it makes fingering chords easier.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Quote by steven seagull
The answer is

"It just does"

at some point the people making guitars decided that was the best way to arrange the strings because it makes fingering chords easier.



Damn you Gibson!!
#11
lol....it was a loooong time before they appeared.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#13
Well there are 7 letters in the musical alphabet. Each string has a note/letter. The alphabet goes A, B, C, D, E, F, G. And the steps go whole (AB), half (BC), whole (CD), whole (DE), half (EF), whole (FG). The letters that have whole steps between them have an accidental note with 2 names in between. The note between C and D can be called C sharp (C#) or D flat (Db). There are no accidental notes between B and C, or E and F. The answer to your question is because every string isn't the same starting note. If you start on E, it's a half step to F, but if you start on D, it's a whole and a half (or 3 half) steps to F (fret 3, string 4).
A great way to learn about this is by this torrent here.
Last edited by tenfold at Jan 14, 2009,
#14
...that's 7 letters.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
Quote by tenfold
The answer to your question is because every string isn't the same starting note. If you start on E, it's a half step to F, but if you start on D, it's a whole and a half (or 3 half) steps to F (fret 3, string 4).
A great way to learn about this is by this torrent here.


That wasn't the question. I know that every string is a different note... well with the exception of 1 and 6 kinda. It started when i was reading up on the caged system, and then i had never questioned why certain finger placements make certain tones. And then i rememberd the triad chords, such as E = E G B, G= G B D, so on so forth. And i was sitting in class trying to make sure that your E chord was consisted of only E's G's and B's, but in my head i was imagining each string going up a whole note on the first step. If this was the cast, E would actually be composed of B#, E#, ( i now know that these do not exist) and A. Open strum would look like this E B# E# A B E. But i got home, played with my tuner and my guitar and thats when i realized something didnt match up, and i realized that 3-5 went up half a step on the first fret and the other 3 went up a whole step. So the basis of the question was, how do 3 strings coming from the same place going to the same place change how much they go up on the scale on the same fret, but now, as the kind people from above have explained, there is no E #, or B #.