#1
Since Axemanchris recently enlightened me as to the fact that I need to pay royalties and other fees if I include a cover on an album, my question is this- if I play them live but don't put them on an album but also put them on my band's myspace page, do I still need to pay some kind of fee?
Question not yourself. Challenge those who would deny you your true self for an independent thinker is the greatest enemy to those who seek to control you
#2
hmmm... not too sure... i wouldn't think so since i've seen other bands on myspace put covers on there. They just put (song name)- Cover from (band name)
#4
no,not unless youre making money (profit) from covering that song.
if the original artist died 40 ot 80 years ago you can do it for free!
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
Taking an Internet break for a while, will come on when I can.
#5
Part 1 - Live use:

In general terms, you can play covers whenever and wherever you want, and make as much money from those ventures as you want.

Typically, a venue pays a blanket license fee to a performing rights association (SOCAN, ASCAP, etc.) every year, which allows them to perform (and even playing a radio station with copyrighted material is considered a public performance of the material) copyrighted works in their public place.

So, if you're in a club somewhere jamming on a Pearl Jam tune and the copyright police show up, it isn't your tail that gets nailed. If the establishment has not paid their license fee, then it is them that is taken to task.

Stores, bars, festivals, school boards, etc. are expected to pay this fee.... essentially any business that uses music to add to the consumers' experience. Imagine a restaurant without music. Grocery stores play music over their sound system. It's everywhere.

Now, notice that I use words like 'generally' and 'typically.' If you are performing at a place that does not typically have music played, like a street party that you organize or something like that, then it is up to YOU to pay this licensing fee.

Part 2: Myspace, etc.

Technically, you have made a copy of someone else's work. Sure, it's you playing the instruments, but someone else wrote that tune. It's theirs. It is violation of copyright. Youtube pulls stuff all the time (though they don't come close to getting all of it), and the same rules apply to Myspace.

There is a movement afoot from performing rights associations where they are working to introduce tariffs for internet sites who host this kind of material, where they, like campus radio stations or community television, etc. would pay an annual blanket license (sound familiar) in exchange for allowing them to broadcast this copyrighted material. The proposed tariff would involve a percentage of the site's revenue.

By comparison, commercial radio and television (except for video stations like MTV) are expected to log and track every piece of music they play, and pay royalties to SOCAN/ASCAP/etc. and those royalties are given directly to the writer of the specific work.

For instance, when one of my songs gets played on campus radio, I don't see any money from that. The annual license goes to SOCAN, and they distribute it over their top x-number of artists. Not the fairest way of doing it, but with so many artists on campus radio that are not SOCAN members (or other international affiliates), it had proven to be a waste of time. When one of my songs gets played on CHTV or Y108, I would get paid for that, because those media track it song by song.


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jan 14, 2009,
#6
Quote by axemanchris
In general terms, you can play covers whenever and wherever you want, and make as much money from those ventures as you want.

Typically, a venue pays a blanket license fee to a performing rights association (SOCAN, ASCAP, etc.) every year, which allows them to perform (and even playing a radio station with copyrighted material is considered a public performance of the material) copyrighted works in their public place.

So, if you're in a club somewhere jamming on a Pearl Jam tune and the copyright police show up, it isn't your tail that gets nailed. If the establishment has not paid their license fee, then it is them that is taken to task.

Stores, bars, festivals, school boards, etc. are expected to pay this fee.... essentially any business that uses music to add to the consumers' experience. Imagine a restaurant without music. Grocery stores play music over their sound system. It's everywhere.

Now, notice that I use words like 'generally' and 'typically.' If you are performing at a place that does not typically have music played, like a street party that you organize or something like that, then it is up to YOU to pay this licensing fee.

CT


See, this is why I friend requested you. You are probably the most knowledgable member on here about anything music business related. As soon as my band gets up and running, you'll be one of the 1st to know. I have a feeling you could help us out with just about anything in the music business.
Question not yourself. Challenge those who would deny you your true self for an independent thinker is the greatest enemy to those who seek to control you
#7
Thanks, man! Keep me posted!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.