#1
So I've been playing guitar for 6+ years now. I started taking lessons in the beginning, but quit after a few months due to lack of money. I can play other people's songs pretty well, but I really play much else (i.e. making my own riffs/songs). I was thinking about taking lessons again, but I'm not exactly sure what I tell my teacher to teach me. Is there anything specific I should learn in the lessons? Also, I don't know any theory, so I'm guessing learning some of that would help?
#3
Do u know music theory yet? and how is you technique? If you dont know music theory i would tell him/her to start there. Then tell him to watch you play a few things. He should be able to pick out some of your flaws.
#4
What exactly do you mean by technique? Also, I was thinking about just taking lessons during the summer. Would three months be enough to learn theory. Right now I don't know any theory.
#5
Quote by artievarn
What exactly do you mean by technique? Also, I was thinking about just taking lessons during the summer. Would three months be enough to learn theory. Right now I don't know any theory.


I don't know if you could learn everything about music theory during three months, but it certainly won't hurt your guitar playing. Having even a basic grasp on music theory will help you out more than it will hinder.
#6
Quote by artievarn
What exactly do you mean by technique? Also, I was thinking about just taking lessons during the summer. Would three months be enough to learn theory. Right now I don't know any theory.


Technique is the difference between just managing to play a song and playing it well. It's all about your smoothness, dynamics etc. And it is definitely worth working on.
#7
Would three months be enough to learn theory.


People go to school for years and write dissertations for music theory.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
People go to school for years and write dissertations for music theory.


Depending on how far you want to take it, 3 months could well be plenty of time.
#9
But I don't think raven wants to write a thesis.

Raven, 3 months of theory will be a decent grasp on it but much of it would rely on self-study after it. What i would recommend is possibly M.I.'s "Harmony and theory" or Berklee's harmony course. Then find a book on chord progressions that goes fairly deep into it.

Another alternative is to get Mark Levine's "The jazz theory book" as this will cover an immense amount of work.

Hope this helped, good luck
#10
Quote by evolucian


Another alternative is to get Mark Levine's "The jazz theory book" as this will cover an immense amount of work.


I'm not sure why this book is recommended by a lot of people -- especially to anyone
new at theory.

"So, over every chord I'm supposed to be thinking about a different mode?" (NO!)
That's the impression they'll get from chapter 1.

The harmony books are probably much better to start. "Jazz Theory Resources" is
what I'd recommend over Levine's book. It treats major/minor harmony very
thoroughly over several chapters before it even mentions the word "mode".

In any case, 3 months you can learn something, but applying it will take longer.
#11
Quote by edg
I'm not sure why this book is recommended by a lot of people -- especially to anyone
new at theory.



I recommended it because he has been playing for more than 6 years so there might be a slight chance he'd read. Though I did say M.I.'s "Harmony and theory" first as it helped alot of my students and its a very easy read, and its a great workbook and study aid. I also did suggest a chord progressions book. I do take back Levine's book but its still an option.

There is one book i can really recommend... actually two
1) The Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer
2) The Complete Guitarist by... um... Richard Bachman i think, I loaned it to a student and can't remember.

These two books, bought at a local bookstore many years ago, have helped me immensely. And still today do they hold little gems that were forgotten or not understood at the time. They should last a lifetime. Hope this helps
#12
Playing for years and not knowing theory is kinda like half as sing your way through school, you'll never get the mechanics of it if you don't learn theory, you'll never learn why it works past, the internet said so.
Quote by SamuelBirkett
wtf r u say make no sensical



SAVE THE MUDKIPS
#13
What I would really like to do is write my own songs, and when I jam with people be able to play something that sounds good. Will theory help with this?
#14
yes, but not without application and messing around with it to construct beautifully
#15
If you can afford it you need to start studying with a teacher again. Tell him/her exactly what you want to accomplish and tell him to taylor your lessons accordingly. You should be working on reading, learning theory, learning chord/scale relationships, basics about improvising.

It would also be very helpful to get some backing tracks that you can jam to and do it on a consistent basis.

Develop a daily practice routine and stick to it.
"How to Become a Better Musician" - is my online course at www.MyOnlineMusicLessons.com. Phrasing and Rhythmic Development, Improv Techniques, Jazz Theory, Ear Training and more. I'm also available for Skype/Hangout lessons.
#16
Quote by evolucian
I recommended it because he has been playing for more than 6 years so there might be a slight chance he'd read. Though I did say M.I.'s "Harmony and theory" first as it helped alot of my students and its a very easy read, and its a great workbook and study aid. I also did suggest a chord progressions book. I do take back Levine's book but its still an option.

There is one book i can really recommend... actually two
1) The Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer
2) The Complete Guitarist by... um... Richard Bachman i think, I loaned it to a student and can't remember.

These two books, bought at a local bookstore many years ago, have helped me immensely. And still today do they hold little gems that were forgotten or not understood at the time. They should last a lifetime. Hope this helps


Stephen King did not write a guitar book :P.
#17
Hahahaha, thanks patriot, that is so true. But, I was close though. The Complete Guitarist by Richard Chapman. So close yet so far, did get my book back though.