#1
I'll take a look at the tabbed out solos later, but I figured I could ask here too, what are some good scales to use over the D-C-G (I-bVII-IV) chord progression used in Sweet Home Alabama? It seems that D minor pentatonic and G minor pentatonic can work pretty well. Any other good ones?
#3
^ you, ya got it all wrong here its (actually michal beat me to it, he got it right, TS got it wrong)

V-IV-I in G
#5
Hm that's weird. I expected it to be V-IV-I but when I played the chords it felt like it was in D.
#6
Quote by Jordan987
Hm that's weird. I expected it to be V-IV-I but when I played the chords it felt like it was in D.


D = V
C = IV
G = I

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#7
Quote by xxdarrenxx
D = V
C = IV
G = I

I know, but if I play those chords and solo in like D minor pentatonic it makes it be in D, where D = I, C = bVII, G=IV.

Sweet Home Alabama is in G because of all the other instruments and melody and whatnot playing in G, but if you just play the chords it could be either couldn't it?
#8
Not really - it's got nothing to do with the melody. The progression resolve very strongly to G...the chords themselves choose the scale for you.
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#10
Because it's a somewhat variant of a blues progression and because in the riff the major 3rd is omitted, so D minor pentatonic won't clash that hard.

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#11
Try chord tones to add some colour.


D = D F# A

C = C E G

G = G B D


G major pentatonic scale = G A B D E


So using a C note over the C chord and an F# over the D chord could add some colour.


Try hitting an F and bending it a half step for some tension.


Whilst soloing over the C hit a B note and bend that a half step aswell, this will give tension.


These are simple ideas but they'll add some different sounds.
#12
Quote by steven seagull
Not really - it's got nothing to do with the melody. The progression resolve very strongly to G...the chords themselves choose the scale for you.

Not really - it sounds like it resolves to D to me. If the song ended with a G, it would sound unstable. To me, anyway.

I would use D major pentatonic, D minor pentatonic/blues, and D mixolydian.

Edit: Now that I try it, I guess G major works too.

Edit again: Of course G major works, since it's enharmonic with D mixolydian. I still say it's in D because I think if it was in G then G minor pentatonic would work OK. But it doesn't.
Last edited by werty22 at Jan 15, 2009,
#14
^Yeah, I realized that when I listened to the song again. But if it's in G, then how come D minor pentatonic works and not G minor pentatonic?

And as I mentioned in my last post, the G major could be D mixolydian. A lot of the individual phrases end on G, but I don't think that necessarily means the song resolves to G.
Last edited by werty22 at Jan 16, 2009,
#15
when I played in a band I often would use D mixo and/or D minor pent. It did sound good that way as well. A lot of options over that progression.
#16
Quote by werty22
^Yeah, I realized that when I listened to the song again. But if it's in G, then how come D minor pentatonic works and not G minor pentatonic?

And as I mentioned in my last post, the G major could be D mixolydian. A lot of the individual phrases end on G, but I don't think that necessarily means the song resolves to G.

There's not really anything to disagree about, the song resolves to G, it's been completely built around that resolution. The unstable chord is the D chord, that's the one that's hanging there waiting for someone to do something with the song.

Obviously if you're just playing around with the chords out of context then things become more ambiguous but a chord progression is just that, a progression...a structured set of chords that are arranged so they all lead to one point of resolution. That's why it's dangerous to spend too much time on paper - theory knowledge is a valuable string to your bow but it's nigh on useless unless you're able to apply that knowledge practically.
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#17
^Obviously there is something to disagree about, because to me it sounds like it resolves to D. It's not an especially strong resolution, but it's there. To me it doesn't sound like it's resolving to G at all. To me the G sounds like the unstable chord.

I don't see how that second paragraph is relevant.
#18
This is what I've found after countless hours trying to figure this stuff out. This song is deceptive. While the song is mainly in G-major... the solo seamlessly flops between G-Major and D-minor often while also exhibiting an A# passing tone often... confuses the hell outta me, even to this day.
#19
Quote by SavaShip
This is what I've found after countless hours trying to figure this stuff out. This song is deceptive. While the song is mainly in G-major... the solo seamlessly flops between G-Major and D-minor often while also exhibiting an A# passing tone often... confuses the hell outta me, even to this day.

Out of everyone here, I think you're closest.



Every time this song comes up no one can agree on what key it's actually in. Yeah, the composer might solo in G... but are you hearing G? Probably. But you could be hearing D.

I'd stick to the chords.

D Major (I or V)
C Major (bVII or IV)
G Major (IV or I)

You could do a lot of things. If you wanted to make G your tonality, hit that C on the D Major chord a lot potentially giving you a D7 if you do it right.

If you wanted to make it sound like D is your resolution hit a C# over the G chord and either resolve it to the D on the D Major or just keep it there making your D Major a DM7.

I haven't listened to the song in forever (nor do I care to), but these are just my observations. Because the options for keys are so close it COULD, theoretically, go both ways. Solo in G for half a solo and then D for the second half. Make it interesting.
#20
Quote by SavaShip
This is what I've found after countless hours trying to figure this stuff out.

That must have really been a ton of hours considering you're three years late to this thread.
#22
This is topic of great contention on the Internet. Here's the grandaddy thread on SHA to end all SHA threads...http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=407446

There are some great guitarists in that discussion, and we all beat this horse dead.
#25
I am interested in learning this i love the HT Stage 60 so far, but is it easy to change all 5 tubes? or are some in need of re biasing? if so which ones and how do you do that?
also what speakers from celestian come with this amp? and has anyone ever put 2 different celestians in an amp to combine for a new sound?i was thinking the Celestian LEAD and the Celestain Vintage 30? but with tubes and speakers i am a total noob. but owuld like to learn
#26
Quote by SuperWeirdoUG
So i guess the conclusion is just play Freebird, at least everyone agrees it's in G major


No, everyone agrees its in G minor.

How the hell can a

G5 B5b F5 C5

Be in G major
#27
doesn't the story go that the guy soloed in G by mistake but it worked out because even though the overall key is G the progression could be looked at as D mixolydian. I think the chords lean stronger to D making it mixolydian, but basically just stick to G and D and you'll be fine
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#28
Quote by mrbabo91
No, everyone agrees its in G minor.

How the hell can a

G5 B5b F5 C5

Be in G major


Holy shit, I really drink to much...

BTW, thanks for correcting
Last edited by SuperWeirdoUG at Mar 6, 2012,
#29
Quote by gerraguitar
doesn't the story go that the guy soloed in G by mistake but it worked out because even though the overall key is G the progression could be looked at as D mixolydian. I think the chords lean stronger to D making it mixolydian, but basically just stick to G and D and you'll be fine



Yes, Ed claims he was playing in G.
#30
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#32
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Because it's a somewhat variant of a blues progression and because in the riff the major 3rd is omitted, so D minor pentatonic won't clash that hard.

i think it sounds terrible honestly. i think that kid rock song has the solo in D minor pent and to me it sounds very very crap. D major pentatonic works better because it shares notes with G major.

but anyway yeah it's in G so play in G OP