#1
I play guitar. This is for sure. It is my 'thing.' I have several and tons of gear.
I also play bass, or I think I do. I have two basses and a few amps (including one big one), and I've been messing with that for a year I'd say. I know a few GNR songs and I can keep in time, play some somewhat difficult stuff, etc. I also finger pick. But I never play bass. I only play it when I am using it for recording. I used to play a lot, but I really play a lot of guitar.
Piano.. This is where I'm unsure. I've "played" for a year. I don't play often and I don't take it too seriously, but I know what I'm doing. I know all the notes, chords, etc. again, I only use it for recording. I couldn't play Piano onstage in a band I don't think but I can get by.
Drums.. I wouldn't add that to the mix. I know ABOUT drums, I know all the diff drums in a kit and cymbals and I can play a few beats and mess around. That's it.

Would I be a multiinstrumentalist, with atleast Guitar and bass? What about piano? Drums? I'm just curious to get a viewpoint from someone other than myself.
#2
You don't have to be at the level of mozart to be considered a piano player. If you can play more then one instrument, you are a multi-instrumentalist.
#3
I'd say you have to have some level of fluency in three or more instruments to be a multi-instrumentalist.
Fluency is a must. Anybody can play anything, but only 1% or so of those will be able to play it fluently and correctly.
And I say three or more because, for example, most guitarists have some level of ability on the bass and vice versa due to the similar platform.
#5
You have to attain some ability on the 'other' instruments. You cn't just be able to play an A on 4 instruments, and call yourself versatile, lol!
#6
If you can make music on multiple instruments.

Whether ur a proficient multi instrumentalist is a different story.


P.s. I can play melodies on (fine tuned/drinked) beer bottles

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#7
I'd say that you become PROFICIENT (key word there) on at least three instruments. If you can't play music on it, then you can't really play it.

It's been hard work, but I've gotten myself to learn to play piano (10 years of classical training), rock keyboard (laugh, but classical and 'pop' require completely different styles of thinking and playing), guitar, bass guitar, clarinet, general concert percussion, drumset (again, some people would say that there's no difference... I'll leave you to be the judge), and I've learned how to sing pretty well.

I mean, once you get the music theory down, the technique is a walk in the park. Since you can apply the same ideas to several different instruments, the world becomes your toy.

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#9
well ive kinda wondered that too. cuz i can play a bunch of instruments, but i only play guitar on a regular basis. but i think if you know what you are doing then you can consider yourself a multi-instrumentist. if you can only play a couple songs, then no. if you can play along with other people on that instrument then i guess you could say you play that instrument. like ive fooled around on the drums, but i would say i play them. i wouldnt be a very good drummer.
#10
If you're a guitarist who can play bass like a guitar, you're not a multi-instrumentalist. If you're good enough at 3 or more different instruments that you could play any one of them in a band, you're a multi-instrumentalist.
#11
If your a guitarist I wouldn't consider Bass as a second instrument. to me its like saying 7 string is a second instrument to the 6. so why would a 4 string be?

to be a Multi-Instrumentalist in my opinion you need to know (like everyone is saying) 3 Instruments. but the instrument has to be different from each other. it can't be bass and guitar as 2 or Synth and piano as 2 but can be guitar/bass and Synth/piano as 2. also need to be able to play correctly and on time.
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#12
If your a guitarist I wouldn't consider Bass as a second instrument. to me its like saying 7 string is a second instrument to the 6. so why would a 4 string be?


Because, personally, I find when I play bass I'm trying to sit at the BACK of the mix with a soft tone, rather than at the FRONT with a snappy, trebly tone (except when slapping/popping).

Also, the Bass isn't just 2 strings less - the frets are larger in width and length.

it can't be bass and guitar as 2 or Synth and piano as 2 but can be guitar/bass and Synth/piano as 2

Same applies here. Same design, but different technique and tone.
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Last edited by J.A.M at Jan 16, 2009,
#13
You sound pretty much like a multi-instrumentalist.

If you work as a professional musician on more than one instrument like I do, then I would call that a professional multi-instrumentalist.
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#14
Quote by J.A.M
Because, personally, I find when I play bass I'm trying to sit at the BACK of the mix with a soft tone, rather than at the FRONT with a snappy, trebly tone (except when slapping/popping).

Also, the Bass isn't just 2 strings less - the frets are larger in width and length.


Even with the same guitar setup you can play different parts - If you can play funk rhythm guitar and metal lead is that two instruments?

As for the scale, is full size and 3/4 scale guitar two different instruments?

inb4 'is bass a long scale guitar or guitar bodied double bass argument'
#15
Quote by cta-joey
If your a guitarist I wouldn't consider Bass as a second instrument. to me its like saying 7 string is a second instrument to the 6. so why would a 4 string be?


Because the techniques and style of play are different, while the instruments are dissimilar enough to be unique. Being able to play guitar doesn't mean you can play bass... unless guitar players are also lutanists, banjo pickers, and mandolin whizzes. After all, it's just a matter of more or fewer strings and different scales, right?
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#16
Quote by Rock Pig
I'd say you have to have some level of fluency in three or more instruments to be a multi-instrumentalist.
Fluency is a must. Anybody can play anything, but only 1% or so of those will be able to play it fluently and correctly.
And I say three or more because, for example, most guitarists have some level of ability on the bass and vice versa due to the similar platform.


Rock Pig, that is rediculous. Is the piano play now a multi-instrumentalist because they can play the piano, clavichord, harpischord, organ, and synthesizer?

Why would you pick "3" as your number of must have instruments?
#17
Quote by Free to Guitar
Because the techniques and style of play are different, while the instruments are dissimilar enough to be unique. Being able to play guitar doesn't mean you can play bass... unless guitar players are also lutanists, banjo pickers, and mandolin whizzes. After all, it's just a matter of more or fewer strings and different scales, right?


The 'different styles of play' argument doesn't really hold up. If you can play classical, blues and metal guitar you are not a multi-instrumentalist.

Well if you think about what techniques you know as a guitar player, it boils down to fingering and picking technique, and knowledge of how to make particular notes (eg knowing scale shapes.) Of the two, the first is much harder to learn because it is instinctive, 'muscle memory' which takes time to build.

Playing a guitar is extremely similar to playing bass. Once you get over the different scale length and string size, you're flying. As for mandolin - it's just a tiny guitar with a different tuning. The chord and scale shapes are different, but the integral core is the same. I'm sick of typing now, I think that sums me up
#18
multi-instrumental means you play more than one instrument... it doesn't matter how well you play it... you be playing a bass at one note per hour and you could still be considered if one if you were banging you're head against piano keys at the same time... I'm playing keys and an axe... both fairly well... and I screw around on bass (slapping is fun) and drums but I only take the first two seriously... I could be considered a multi-instrumentalist..
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As my old guitar teacher once said: Metal really comes from classical music. The only difference is pinch harmonics, double bass, and lyrics about killing goats.
#19
Quote by John Tutino
You sound pretty much like a multi-instrumentalist.

If you work as a professional musician on more than one instrument like I do, then I would call that a professional multi-instrumentalist.



Id go with this. I find it really hard being a multi instru mentalist because im doing music every waking hour...apart from when playing xbox. In the last month ive tried to learn sound recording and mixing (pretty indepth), Fur Elise and fly me to the moon on keys, six stoke roll and buddy rich stuff on drums and just getting more into music theory today, as well as writing with my prog metal band on guitar (and recording next week). Next thing is learning sax. Also portrait of tracy on bass.

In hindsight i would say keys is the best 2nd instrument to learn because it gives you a range of abilities in melody, understanding theory better, chord voicings, harmony and ear training is easier.
Last edited by Zbigniev at Jan 17, 2009,