#1
I want to improve my sense of timing and my ability to count. Obviously, I need to practice to a metronome, and i do. I'm looking for some exercises that I can do that focuses on rhythym. I want to be able to subdivide beats perfectly, and I want to be able to keep a steady beat. Can someone give me some ideas on how to practice this?
#2
Tapping your foot while you play is a good way of improving sense of time. Also playing with others and just building experience from that improves my sense of time. I don't know if you are doing either one of those but they sure help me.
"A sense of purpose overrides reason."- Terry Goodkind

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix


\,,/GETCHA PULL!!!\,,/
- the late and ever-loved "Dimebag" Darrell Lance Abbott
#3
Start strumming every beat with a downstroke.
Then double up the speed, still with downstrokes - that's 8th notes you're playing.
Then double up again the speed by doing alternate picking to play 16th notes.

Obviously start at a comfortable tempo, and slowly increase (by 1bpm at first, then by 5bpm).
Quote by gudinge
Wasn't there a thread about this like yesterday?
Quote by ivan_2894
This guy knows what he's talking about
(Ab)using:
* Ibanez PF5 acoustic * Gibson '08 LP Classic * Schecter Damien FR *
* Marshall JCM 2k DSL401 *
* Boss OS-2 * Boss DD-7 *

Eyes on Wah & SD pups
#4
yeah man, use a metronome whenever you play and just play songs with people or with the radio/whatever. its the best way for you to get a sense of time burnt into your brain.
Quote by Diet_coke_head
Hey! Now you can molest you're grandma and she won't remember! Score!!!



Gear:
Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass
Fender V Jazz
Ashdown MAG 410
EH Bass Big MUff
MXR Bass Octave Deluxe
Digitech Synth Wah
#6
Quote by tickler444
Start strumming every beat with a downstroke.
Then double up the speed, still with downstrokes - that's 8th notes you're playing.
Then double up again the speed by doing alternate picking to play 16th notes.

Obviously start at a comfortable tempo, and slowly increase (by 1bpm at first, then by 5bpm).


Thats good advice.

But instead of calling them 8th notes, call them quavers
and 16ths call them semi-quavers.

Cause whether you like theory or not, its best to get into good habits.

also, come up with four notes to play, in a scale perhaps, and play 1 on the beat, then 2 and 3 and then play 4 on the beat and go back down 3 then 2 then 1 on the beat...

Thats a good excercise, and then try something like 1,2,3,4 - 4,3,2,1 with the start of each group of four on the beat. similar to the last one, but just an extra note.

hope thats some help
Gear:

Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Fender Telecaster USA
Epiphone Les Paul
Epiphone Sheraton
Jackson KE3 Kelly Pro
Boss Super Chorus
Boss Super Overdrive
MXR Carbon Copy
Morley Pro Series Wah/Volume/Distortion
t.bone wireless system.
#9
Quote by tilinmyowngrave
Thats good advice.

But instead of calling them 8th notes, call them quavers
and 16ths call them semi-quavers.

Cause whether you like theory or not, its best to get into good habits.



You might hate the Americans, but do please explain what the bad habit is.
"And everybody knows that you live forever
Ah, when you've done a line or two"
Last edited by mr_magic at Jan 15, 2009,
#10
Quote by tilinmyowngrave
Thats good advice.

But instead of calling them 8th notes, call them quavers
and 16ths call them semi-quavers.

Cause whether you like theory or not, its best to get into good habits.


wow...
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
#11
Ok let me clarify some things, I guess I was kind of vague. I can read and count music, I tap my foot and all that good stuff. I've taken two years of band at school, so I know a fair amount. I play mostly bass lately, and some guitar with my free time. I have been playing with some friends and we have don't have the greatest timing. I think we tend to speed up as we play also, especially on slow songs. Usually I use the drummer as my metronome, but I want to be able to keep time perfectly on my own.

Also while subdividing a note, the timing is a bit sloppy. I want to be able to play all the way to sextuplets with perfect time. Any suggestions? Exercises? A book perhaps?
#13
Quote by mr_magic
You might hate the Americans, but do please explain what the bad habit is.


hah, its lazy. Mozart wouldn't have said "yeah, im gonna play this next bit using 8ths"

And its not my fault the americans have to dumb it down so its easier to remember.

Also, if you ever play with a band outside of america, and someones explaining it to you in terms of quavers and semi quavers, your screwed... so just learn it.
Gear:

Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Fender Telecaster USA
Epiphone Les Paul
Epiphone Sheraton
Jackson KE3 Kelly Pro
Boss Super Chorus
Boss Super Overdrive
MXR Carbon Copy
Morley Pro Series Wah/Volume/Distortion
t.bone wireless system.
#14
Quote by tilinmyowngrave
hah, its lazy. Mozart wouldn't have said "yeah, im gonna play this next bit using 8ths"

And its not my fault the americans have to dumb it down so its easier to remember.

Also, if you ever play with a band outside of america, and someones explaining it to you in terms of quavers and semi quavers, your screwed... so just learn it.


I don't think so... Every musician I know, that doesn't know Lithuanian language, calls them "whole, half, quarter, 8th, 16th" notes and not "semi braves, quavers, etc.". I like american way, because it's straight down to the point and understandable for everyone. Why do these classical musicians want to be so fancy?
#15
Quote by tilinmyowngrave
hah, its lazy. Mozart wouldn't have said "yeah, im gonna play this next bit using 8ths"

Indeed he wouldn't, he'd probably have said something like

"Jawol, ich werde den nächsten Teil mit Achtelen"
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#16
I Find traveling faster than the speed of light, whilst in the Bermuda Triangle worsens my sense of time .

Damn you time dilation! DAMN YOU TO HELL, THE STATUE OF LIBERTY?!?

Being serious, just keep playing while being conscious of the beat and you will improve. Once you get the basics ingrained, work on more complicated rhythms, it just comes with playing. To a certain extent. But metronomes/drum or backing tracks help.
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#17
Quote by steven seagull
Indeed he wouldn't, he'd probably have said something like

"Jawol, ich werde den nächsten Teil mit Achtelen"




I prefer the American system, easier for everyone to remember, tbh.
#19
Quote by Zbigniev
great lesson for you

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ4FZ80Qdd8

probably the best guitarist in terms of natural rhythm..watch his foot. Even his foot tap is impossible!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rS2SQbAK76c


I agree! Al Di Meola is great at rhythms and acoustic guitar. I've learned much from him.

Edit: Paco is also amazing! ;]
#20
Just typed a long post, and had it eaten by the browser. Grrr. Anyway, take #2...

Quote by Freepower
I like to take a beat, play whole notes, half, quarter, 8ths, triplets, 16ths, quints,

sextuplets.

Give it a go, fun, suprisingly hard.


That's great advice. Also practice playing a certain number of notes of a given length. For example, 6

8ths followed by a quarter note. Different numbers of notes have a certain feel to them, that you have

to learn to recognize.

Count out loud when practicing,e.g. 1-ee-and-uh, 2-ee-and-uh for 16ths. The more senses you get into

the action while practicing the the better it will stick.

Try coming up with a rhythmic pattern, then improvising using it - i.e. you may play whatever notes you want, but you have to stick to that one rhythmic pattern. That's a lot of fun, challenging, and a great confidence builder for real improvising.

To follow on from FP's suggestion - once you have the subdividing down, start mixing different subdivisions, e.g. 2 beats of 8ths followed by 2 beats of 8th note triplets, repeat. Taken to extremes, this can be very difficult - for example switching between 6's and 5's every beat. You can develop fantastic control in your picking hand this way.

Start missing out notes. For example, 16th, 16th, 16th rest, 16th. All the various combos have a distinct feel that important to learn, and get internalised.

Listen to the drums, and mimic the rythms on the guitar. That's a good one.

There are literally dozens of things you can do, most of them great fun. This is really one of the most fun aspects of playing guitar for me.
#21
^ Yeah, that's what I do as well. If you want to improve you timing and rhythm,
practice different ones. The way some people sound like they practice, music is
all 16th notes.

If you take the same notes, or repeating patterns, or just patterns, it not only
sounds different at different rhythms it FEELS COMPLETELY different. My ScaleOme
Studies profile, http://artists.ultimate-guitar.com/scaleome_proj/, has lots of
examples.

About counting: It should be done where you can, but I think there's a practical limit
to it. I can't really count past 16th notes (YMMV). You can use some other
practice tools to help with this (like playing in groups, add a note, ....).
#22
hah, its lazy. Mozart wouldn't have said "yeah, im gonna play this next bit using 8ths"

And its not my fault the americans have to dumb it down so its easier to remember.

Also, if you ever play with a band outside of america, and someones explaining it to you in terms of quavers and semi quavers, your screwed... so just learn it.






I live in Europe and I know the traditional system, the American system (which is what I use because it makes the most sense) and the Spanish system (which I also use seeing I live in Spain).


I can't believe you think the American system is dumbing it down. That's ridiculous. It's actually a much more efficient system which a beginner can understand much faster than the traditional system.

As for TS, use a metronome as opposed to your foot. We can slightly alter our foot speed to suit our lack of timing(you might not even notice) but a metronome is a machine. It won't slow down or speed up for you.