#1
Right now, I'm trying to focus on mastering control over something that every book I've ever read on guitars has told me to avoid: buzzing. I had a realization the other day about the possibilities of adding in carefully-placed intentional buzzing to my compositions.

I have many ideas on how to implement it, yet I'm sure I have to COMPLETELY master control of this and have flawless technique on the notes that are not buzzed for the usually frustrating unintentional sound to sound intentional to a listener. Has anyone heard any good examples of someone implementing this buzzing in an interesting way? I couldn't find much on the net (make that none) regarding actually harnessing the power of the buzz instead of ignoring it.

Also, anyone use any other techniques that are rarely, if ever, covered in a guitar book or this forum, etc?
#2
You're talking about fret buzz, I take it?

How can you create that artificially?

Are you just "slapping" the strings? Like picking away from the guitar and letting the string "slap" back down against the frets....or pushing the string down as you pick?

Because that's not really so revolutionary.

Maybe explain exactly what you're talking about?
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
Last edited by Guitartist at Jan 16, 2009,
#3
i havent ever come across that idea before, but if you could use it as you say, it'd sound pretty cool.
maybe it'd sound good with a dive bomb or something?
nick_b is currently obsessed with:
Pokemon
Pinch Harmonics
12/8 timing
7/8 timing
Lamb of God
Rise Against
Regina Spektor
Dream Theater
and many others...
#4
Ummm I think there is a Rush song off their new album where you can hear some musical fret buzz. It might be the Armor and the Sword. I'm not sure what kind of music you want to use it in.
Stuff I use:

Schecter C-1 Classic
Ibanez RG350DX
Peavey 5150 (Signature)
Marshall 1960AV
#5
You hear strings buzzing all of the time when you hand someone a guitar and try to get them to play nearly any chord. The goal is always for a clear sound, but the idea to actually practice employing it came from a song by The Dodos called "Walking" that has a consistently well-used buzzing coming from some sort of acoustic stringed instrument. The music around it is clear and really beautiful sounding, then a buzzing string comes into the mix and it makes for a great song.

To actually create the buzzing requires the right amount of pressure with the finger that is fretting the note and fretting as far as possible from the fret, opposite of what is usually taught.
#6
Quote by Cornly
You hear strings buzzing all of the time when you hand someone a guitar and try to get them to play nearly any chord. The goal is always for a clear sound, but the idea to actually practice employing it came from a song by The Dodos called "Walking" that has a consistently well-used buzzing coming from some sort of acoustic stringed instrument. The music around it is clear and really beautiful sounding, then a buzzing string comes into the mix and it makes for a great song.

To actually create the buzzing requires the right amount of pressure with the finger that is fretting the note and fretting as far as possible from the fret, opposite of what is usually taught.


Ye that's called fret buzz.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#7
Well thank you for the clarification .

Does anyone use it, or have any other similar ideas to include in practice and composition?