#1
So on guitar pro this tab says I need to tune down a half step, that's no prob.

But it's shows the notes as D#, A#, F#, C#, G#, D#

And not Eb etc.

I'm confused, do I just tune down a half step?
#4
Took me a few seconds to figure out the strings are listed in reverse order. That's just every string down a semi-tone: Eb Standard.
#5
Quote by Revhain
I'm not good at this but... Eb=D# ?

That is correct!
D#, A#, F#, C#, G#, D#
^ little E string.
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Last edited by boxcarmonument at Jan 16, 2009,
#8
Um, that's not Eb standard. There's a Bb (A#) where there should be an Ab (G#). Or do you have it backwards? (You type the lowest string first, highest one last {EADGBE})
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#9
Think of a keyboard: D# is the next note after D, which is the black note in between D and E. Eb is the next note before E, which is the same black note. There's no black note inbetween B and C, and so Cb = B and B# = C.
#10
Yes, I typed it reverse, it was just copy and paste.
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#11
Yes, Guitar Pro tunings start with the high E string which they call 1. It tricks the mind, but is actually correct. You just have to get used to it.
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#12
It's not Eb standard in theory, it's D# standard. But it rings out just like an Eb standard.
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#13
Quote by ..NEM..
It's not Eb standard in theory, it's D# standard. But it rings out just like an Eb standard.


Why is that? Are you only supposed to use the sharps in theory? Or do you mean because the way it was written in the OP?
#14
Quote by ..NEM..
It's not Eb standard in theory, it's D# standard. But it rings out just like an Eb standard.



I don't think thats right.

Even in my orchestra, its called Eb

You can call it D# as well, its the same thing. No differences at all.
#16
It's called Enharmonic, it means that, for example, C# is also Db.

They're both the same note, but with two different names.

So Eb is D#


Hope that makes sense.
#18
Just to add, incase you haven't learned them yet.


Here's all the music notes, with sharps and flats, starting with A until we reach it's octave, A.

A - A#/Bb - B - C - C#/Db - D - D#/Eb - E - F - F#/Gb - G - G#/Ab - A


It's confusing at first, but as you can see, A# and Bb are the same note, but with two different names, which is reffered to as Enharmonic.


Hopefully this has cleared it up further.
#19
Some of the notes in Eb will not register as flats on a tuner they will register as sharps, I know this is my tuning on my RG.
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#20
On other instruments there can be differences with temperament, but on the guitar it's all the same. The only difference is notational conventions. A diatonic scale (7 notes) should have precisely one of each letter to allow for the least possible use of accidentals when written on a score. For instance the G major scale is G A B C D E F# G - you could write this as G A B C D E Gb G, and it would be the same notes, but it would make a mess of even a simple piece in sheet music.

So yeah, Eb and D# standard are the same tunings. If you want to be pedantic then you'd be in Eb standard whenever you played in say Ab major, and D# standard whenever you played in say C# minor.
#21
Quote by boxcarmonument
That is correct!
D#, A#, F#, C#, G#, D#
^ little E string.


woo! great. Finally something sticks : )