#1
Hey everyone, I'm mainly a bass player but I've always wanted to play some fun acoustic songs on my sister's guitar. She never plays it anymore but I hope it's okay to learn on because it's only a 3/4 scale guitar (It's a Ventura brand). I've never heard of it, but can anyone give me suggestions on how to get started learning? Maybe what chords to learn or an easy song I should practice? Thanks!
#2
easiest song ive ever played was hey there deliah by plain white t's i know its gay but its easy. and its a good start and try out some paramore songs their easy.
#3
The first thing you're going to have to learn are some open chords. Usually, you'll learn easy ones, such as A, Em and D. These are all pretty easy. From there, you begin to add onto your chord library with new chords. If you want, I can post a chord chart here, or you can just do a Google search and find sites that teach intro to guitar.
#4
Thanks for the replies, KG6_Steven I'll just save you time and google a chord chart. I think I'm going to look up some tabs for paramore or something and see how far I can get. If anyone else has suggestions, please post them.
#5
You're welcome. Just remember that my 3 or 4 lines was far from exhaustive. I know people who've taken lessons for 4 and 5 years and are still learning. The chords I listed are just a good starting point. You're also going to need to learn the names of the notes on at least the 5th and 6th strings. Learning the notes on all the strings would be an added bonus that will pay huge dividends later. You'll also want to start learning scales at some point. The pentatonic minor, pentatonic major, major and relative minor scales are good ones to know. Of course there are many more, but again, this is a good place to start. The good thing is, you've already got experience playing the bass, so you're not a total beginner. There are some sites out there with beginner lessons. Some of these sites are decent. There are also DVDs available for sale. While you can learn from a DVD, I tend to not recommend them, since the lessons are too general, too short and span too much info on one disc - in other words, 1 lesson can be teaching beginner chords and another having you try to play along with a song you're not ready to play. If you can afford to go the instructor route, it's not a bad idea at all. Good luck and welcome to 6 strings.
#6
Yeah I get what you're saying. I already know the notes on the fretboard and a lot of scales and music theory from playing bass so I kind of have a head start already!
#7
Quote by KG6_Steven
I know people who've taken lessons for 4 and 5 years and are still learning.


There's the problem.

TS, there's no better way to learn to play guitar than to teach yourself. Lessons are extremely costly and not worth it.
Quote by Turkeyburger
It's not cool to make fun of people with disabilities.....

(Being Norwegian is a disability)


Quote by BK202



#8
Well I hope it's alright to learn on a 3/4 model guitar both of my acoustics are 3/4, but I'm getting a full sized one soon. The tone is different thats it. Both, unless you get a cutaway, have 14 frets available most of the time.
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Peavey Vypyr 75w
Yamaha FG730S
Peavey Predator
1961 Acoustic Kay
Classical Rhapsody
Zakk Wylde Crybaby Wah Pedal
Boss SD-1
#9
Hey guys I'm back to report on some progress that I've made. I can now play the intro to wish you were here by pink floyd lol! I'm gonna have to put in some work on the verse and chorus to get these chord changes down however.
#10
Quote by cloudjessie42
There's the problem.

TS, there's no better way to learn to play guitar than to teach yourself. Lessons are extremely costly and not worth it.

You're ... you're kidding, right? How did you learn to read? Did you teach yourself? What about algebra? Did you teach yourself that, too?

And as far as "extremely costly" goes, that all depends on the instructor.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#11
Quote by cloudjessie42
There's the problem.

TS, there's no better way to learn to play guitar than to teach yourself. Lessons are extremely costly and not worth it.

This is probably the dumbest comment I've ever seen on UG outside of the Pit.

No matter how good you are, there is always something to learn from other people, especially if you find a good teacher.
It's Only Rock and Roll, But I like It
#12
I say start out with the three most basic chords (i my opinion) which are G, C and D. After that head to the "beginner" section in the stickied What Songs? thread right here in the acoustic forum. It should satisfy ya
Pot
Kettle
Black
#13
Quote by Chad48309
You're ... you're kidding, right? How did you learn to read? Did you teach yourself? What about algebra? Did you teach yourself that, too?


So you're implying it's impossible for one to teach oneself guitar?
Quote by Turkeyburger
It's not cool to make fun of people with disabilities.....

(Being Norwegian is a disability)


Quote by BK202



#14
from what i've seen self taught guitarists learn much more QUICKLY than those who take lessons, and in less time are much better than those taking lessons...however, i think this is in part due to the fact that if you're teaching yourself to play you must REALLY want to learn, whereas people taking lessons may be less excited about it, forced by their parents, etc. causing them not to improve nearly as rapidly as the self-taughts. im self taught and better than anyone i know who is taking lessons but--im really into it and practice like 4 hours a day. if i was just as dedicated PLUS took lessons i would no doubt be a far better musician than i will be now

as for the original poster--wish you were here is a great one to start with to get chord changes down, also try free falling by tom petty and the chords to simple man, those are some that i used when i first started just to help me get used to switching between the basic chords. if you want more similarly easy song suggestions let me know, i've got tons
#15
Quote by cloudjessie42
So you're implying it's impossible for one to teach oneself guitar?

Not at all. I've met people who've taught themselves to read; they just read with a noticeable hinderance (not that I'm saying this is always the case). Playing guitar is the same way. You can certainly teach yourself, but it is far more efficient and productive to make use of a teacher. They have several years (possibly decades) of experience to share.
Quote by Dr89
if i was just as dedicated PLUS took lessons i would no doubt be a far better musician than i will be now

Either way, you get out what you put into it. A little extra help never hurts.

Bottom line (so that no one misunderstands my intention); I would never discourage anyone from taking lessons, and I'm sure neither would Chris Thile, Oscar Levant, Niccolò Paganini, etc.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
Last edited by Chad48309 at Jan 21, 2009,
#16
Quote by Chad48309
Not at all. I've met people who've taught themselves to read; they just read with a noticeable hinderance (not that I'm saying this is always the case). Playing guitar is the same way. You can certainly teach yourself, but it is far more efficient and productive to make use of a teacher. They have several years (possibly decades) of experience to share.

Either way, you get out what you put into it. A little extra help never hurts.

Bottom line (so that no one misunderstands my intention); I would never discourage anyone from taking lessons, and I'm sure neither would Chris Thile, Oscar Levant, Niccolò Paganini, etc.

^ +1
I dont see why youre arguing with this dude.
ANYONE who says they couldnt learn anything from other musicians (a teacher counts!) is a complete fool, and I may be a self-taught guitarist in the sense that I've never gone to a guitar teacher, but I've learnt tons from other people. Its easy to become more inspired about guitaring, when you have the ability to bounce off someone else.
Quote by clapton-floyd
I don't believe in free will, I believe in Rohypnol.