#1
I know power chords are easy to play, but it's finding the ones that sound good together is what is hard. I've learned a crap load of theory (aparantly not enough though) and it still seems extremely complex and way too hard for all I want to do, which is to create a simple power chord progression. I know the C major scale which uses the notes C D E F G A B *C*, and then the steps of WWHWWWH, using intervals to find the minor 2nd, major 2nd, ect. But I still can't figure out how to use all of this to make a progression.
Can anyone enlighten me?
#2
F%&$ Theory and play with feeling. Heaps of people get way to caught up in being technical just play from the damn heart and you should come up with something not half bad
#4
Scale tone chords

MmmMMmMDim

Pick any 2-4 random numbers. Like 1, 4, 1 ,3.

The chords you end up playing are C, F, C, Em

./shrug

It's the way I do it. I'll let someone more experienced step in and explain =p
#5
Quote by BucketHayden
F%&$ Theory and play with feeling. Heaps of people get way to caught up in being technical just play from the damn heart and you should come up with something not half bad

uh, no. Playing with feeling is more than possible with theory. There is no bad side to learning theory

Try some of the stuff on this site. Actually i recommend this source, it should make everything crystal clear. "Powerchords" are usually just x5 chords and sometimes with the octave as well. Thus they are also easier to fit into a keys, since they are just the root and fifth. I recomend getting a good book so you can understand some of the more complex sides and grow to be able to incorporate all kinds of chords. Hope that makes sense.

Emotion = true music

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Last edited by CryingAlone at Jan 16, 2009,
#6
Yeah, I try to make stuff up, but it ends up sounding like garbage. I would imagine it would sound better if I had some direction.

EDIT:
That site you sent me helped quite a bit, thanks.
Last edited by Imetal at Jan 16, 2009,
#7
Quote by BucketHayden
F%&$ Theory and play with feeling. Heaps of people get way to caught up in being technical just play from the damn heart and you should come up with something not half bad


deffinately dont listen to this guy. you can use theory to guide and express your feeling, and sound a lot better. most of the time the things that sound good are due to theory, whether you know it or not.
Quote by illuminatiano
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there are drugs there

( and ololol there are )
#8
Quote by CryingAlone
uh, no. Playing with feeling is more than possible with theory. There is no bad side to learning theory

Try some of the stuff on this site. Actually i recommend this source, it should make everything crystal clear. "Powerchords" are usually just x5 chords and sometimes with the octave as well. Thus they are also easier to fit into a keys, since they are just the root and fifth. I recomend getting a good book so you can understand some of the more complex sides and grow to be able to incorporate all kinds of chords. Hope that makes sense.


When i said **** theory i didnt mean give it up and stop learning i ment he should use what he knows and what he feels subconsciously. The theory uve learnt will come out when u just play
#9
Quote by gnaraaron
deffinately dont listen to this guy. you can use theory to guide and express your feeling, and sound a lot better. most of the time the things that sound good are due to theory, whether you know it or not.


"Whether you know it or not" is the key part of that sentence. You don't need to know the exact rules of gravity to know that when you jump, you go back to the ground. Knowing theory isn't important at all, because in the end, what sounds good sounds good. Sure, it's all based on theory, but as long as you know the fretboard, then you'll be fine. Doesn't matter if you don't know how it works on paper.
#11
first off, in the key of C, there are 6 regualar power chords (x5 chords) and 1 flatted 5 chord (in the key of C Bb5(no3rd) is the correct spelling), so to be theoretically correct a chord progression of 1-4-3-7-1 (random chord progression), in the key of C major would be.

C5-F5-E5-Bb5(no3rd)-C5

reason being that if you form all the chords in the C major scale the B chord will be a bm7b5 or B half-diminished (with a full diminished chord being spelt 1 b3 b5 bb7). this applies to all major scales in every key.

(to make a Bb5(no3rd) chord just make a regular power chord and move the 5th (the note you will finger on the string below your index), and move it down one fret)
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#12
Theory is important for some stuff, but come on, he's trying to string power chords together. How much theory do you really need for that? You can just play some different power chords until you decide "hey, this one sounds good after this one" and go from there.
If you're not getting enough gain, you should totally just daisy-chain some solid state amps with headphone jacks together. Remember: Need gain? Use a chain!
------
Quote by Normul
You spell things like a jackass
#13
Quote by JELIFISH19
"Whether you know it or not" is the key part of that sentence. You don't need to know the exact rules of gravity to know that when you jump, you go back to the ground. Knowing theory isn't important at all, because in the end, what sounds good sounds good. Sure, it's all based on theory, but as long as you know the fretboard, then you'll be fine. Doesn't matter if you don't know how it works on paper.


Nothing is "based on" theory. Theory is descriptive. You don't use it to write, you use it to analyze what you've already written.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#14
Nothing is "based on" theory. Theory is descriptive. You don't use it to write, you use it to analyze what you've already written.

I don't think that's true. Do you understand musical theory? At the root of it, it's got rules for what sounds good. You can follow those rules to make something that you know will sound musical. Just like physics theory and rules can be used to accurately predict the result of something before you do it. So maybe theory starts out as analysis but it becomes a basis for new creation.
If you're not getting enough gain, you should totally just daisy-chain some solid state amps with headphone jacks together. Remember: Need gain? Use a chain!
------
Quote by Normul
You spell things like a jackass
Last edited by thelonesoldier at Jan 16, 2009,
#15
Quote by thelonesoldier
I don't think that's true at all. Do you understand musical theory? At the root of it, it's got rules for what sounds good. You can follow those rules to make something that you know will sound musical. Just like physics theory and rules can be used to accurately predict the result of something before you do it.


I'm a regular in the Musician Talk forum and know quite a lot of theory. It is not rules, and that's that. It could be described as "guidelines" at most. Try saying that theory is "rules" in MT and you'll be ripped to shreds by the likes of Archeo Avis.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#16
the rules of theory are there mearly as guidelines, not as rules set in stone. sure you can write music by following theory to the letter, but in the end you don't have to, if you don't want to.

the problem is, anything that sounds good when played together is pretty musch guarenteed to be covered by music theory, which gives the anti-music theory guys carte blanche to open fire.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#17
Quote by thelonesoldier
I don't think that's true. Do you understand musical theory? At the root of it, it's got rules for what sounds good. You can follow those rules to make something that you know will sound musical. Just like physics theory and rules can be used to accurately predict the result of something before you do it. So maybe theory starts out as analysis but it becomes a basis for new creation.


I don't know anything about theory, but I do know science and english. If there were rules, it would be "music LAW," not theory
#18
I didn't mean rules you have to follow. Rules as in "if you do this, this will happen", like if you drop a ball, it will accelerate downward at 9.8m/s/s. Maybe I should have said laws, but that sounds stricter than rules. You don't have to drop the ball, but you can use the "law" of gravity to predict what will happen. Yes, someone figured that out by analyzing something that already happened, but you can apply that knowledge to your own actions. Isn't musical theory the same? I guess I don't know much, but my impression was that you can use musical theory to create chords, scales, progressions, etc.
If you're not getting enough gain, you should totally just daisy-chain some solid state amps with headphone jacks together. Remember: Need gain? Use a chain!
------
Quote by Normul
You spell things like a jackass
Last edited by thelonesoldier at Jan 16, 2009,
#19
Again, thanks for the replies. It makes much more sense now. I'm learning theory because I've decided it would make me a better musician. I'm not that great at guitar but I figure, if I know what's going on in a song and why, then it will help the overall understanding. If any of that makes sense.
#20
Quote by BucketHayden
F%&$ Theory and play with feeling. Heaps of people get way to caught up in being technical just play from the damn heart and you should come up with something not half bad

too right man

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