#1
ive been playing for 3 months teaching my self i only play maybe ten minutes a day i can play all of seven nation army for obvios reasons i think its the easiest song ever i can also play scream by avenged sevenfold exept for the solo and the main riffs to smoke on the water, mississippi queen, bat country, blinded in chains, sunshine of your love, aqualung, in-da-gada-da-vita, rock you like a hurricane, iron man, enter sandman, the solo to smells like teen spirit and the intro's to the one, sanitarium (welcome home), unforgivin, nothing else matters, black magic women, hells bells i can do some bassic sweep picking, pinch harmonics, tremelo picking and scales basicly what im asking is if im learning fast or slow if im decent for the amount of time i put into the instrument what i should do to get better any other songs i should learn/practice i want to learn the bat country solo but i cant seem to get it yet so any advice on that would be great thnx.
#2
I don't know about the rest of you but it certainly doesn't impress me when people say and think they can play guitar like a pro after a month. I mean I'm not saying just cause you're beginning you suck, but I mean, be modest.
#3
I think you should slow down a bit and learn a little bit of music theory. Read "The Crusade" and there's some lessons on UG as well if you look in the articles on main page. That's what I'm doing right now and I've been playing for a couple months now.

If you want to improve a bit more, I think you should learn the notes on the fretboard and also read some of those lesson articles and maybe pick yourself up a book on guitar learning and guitar technique. Last but not least, try to practice at least half hour to an hour a day.

I wouldn't worry about tremolo picking, sweep picking and pinch harmonics at your skill level. You need to get your more basic skills down first, like alternate picking, fretting hand dexterity, limiting movement of fret hand especially the pinky, things like at. And also very important to practice with a metronome every so often, get your time counting down, that's also very important.
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Last edited by MustangSVT at Jan 17, 2009,
#4
I wrote this on another thread, but I think it might apply here too. Basically, if you want an easy way to guarantee your skill will increase, while still leaving time to learn songs, you might want to try this.

1) Find some good exercises/warm-ups that will improve finger dexterity and ability to stretch. Usually a chromatic exercise works here. Use a metronome when you play it as it also will help your rhythm, which is a must for playing with people. Make sure these exercises are things you can do daily for 10 minutes or so.

2) If you're having trouble with a part of a song, make it an exercise and do it with the chromatic every day slowly at first. Then build up, and this should help a lot.

3) Figure out something generic that you have a problem with, such as independence between the third and fourth finger. Get your guitar and watch some tv, while mindlessly fretting the third finger, then removing it and fretting with the fourth, and repeat. After an episode of Heroes or something every Monday night, this will help you a lot. (alternate picking works well here too).

These are the three main things I did besides learning songs and playing with others. They're good because they either take up little time, or they're doable while you do something else (TV for example). This means you're racking up experience and practice hours much quicker than normally, and you're subconsciously making it easier to play.


Plus, I agree 100% with mustang, music theory is definitely something you should learn if you wanna be a good guitarist. Also, make sure your rhythm is tight, or everyone will get P.O.'d when you solo out of rhythm (if you decide to jam with others).
#5
Holy crap, your entire post was ONE SENTENCE. Please learn to use periods it makes it much less difficult to read. And I believe you have a common misconception that almost every starting guitarist has (I know I did.) You THINK you can play all of those songs, until eventually you hear someone else play it and you realize how much work you need. Knowing how to play it is not the same as being able to play it well. I don't know though, maybe you're a prodigy. I would definitely take the above advice and learn some theory. Plus, work on playing songs well, not just learn to play a lot of songs.

Good luck.
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LET'S GO BUCKS
Last edited by AeroRocker at Jan 17, 2009,
#6
thnx mustang i will slow down a bit and practice more i just read the harmonics lesson and learned quite a bit more than i thought i would and more than i thought harmonics hade to learn ill make sure to do read these lessons more offten as for the metronome should i play the songs i allready no and just get the timing perfect or just do basic scales and such and l can alt pick with relitive ease i just forgot to type that out as stupid as this is going to sound i think my fretting hands stamina is built pretty good as i played rock band every day for about 6-8 hours a day till my hand could go all day long without getting tired or losing speed and that also taught me to use my pinky instead of just sliding down and using my three main fingers my bigest problem currently is more complex chords and jumping two or more strings with my picking hand sometimes i jump three or just one and miss my mark and i know rock band is nothing like real guitar but it did help with stamina and h/p
#7
3 Months of playing, 10 minutes a day, and you say you can sweep pick?

I don't believe you. Flat out plain and simple, I don't believe you. Oh, and not to mention you are saying you are teaching yourself, which means you would have to figure out finger placements, and techniques all on your own without someone teaching you. Again, I don't believe you. If you are doing this in such a short period of time, you are doing it wrong. I hate to be a jerk, but that's the honest truth.

Slow it down, if you try and get too far ahead of your game, you are going to be playing things wrong, sloppy, incorrectly, and could be making be trying to play it in a way that is harder than it actually should be. As people suggested, read some musical theory, learn all of the notes on the guitar by simply looking at the fretboard.

Knowledge can prove to be a really useful tool.
#8
i smell a troll..

besides, you dont go from smoke on the water to bat country. the level of difficulty is incredibly diverse.
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#9
After roughly 8 months of playing, I'm reading some of these basics lessons (the basics of constructing chords, intervals, general music theory) and what I'm realizing is the following:

- knowing the notes on the fretboard is very valuable
- a musical ear and distinguishing between intervals/notes is also very valuable
- understanding how to construct chords and intervals is also valuable knowledge

I have been practicing major/minor/pentatonic scales for last few months, I basically make exercises out of that and chords. I make exercises for various techniques i.e. alt picking, economy picking, palm muting, chord switching, muting unwanted strings, minimizing hand movement, slide, hammeron/pulloff. But what I understand now is that if I learn how to understand intervals and musical notes in scales, I could become a better overall guitarist. I'm not there yet, I need to devote some time on reading up music theory and of course practice, but I hope I'll eventually get there.

By the way it's also good to learn a song every so often of course, but I suggest sticking to a certain song and trying to get it down. As for metronome/timing, I would recommend doing a few exercises with metronome (basic 4/4 time, nothing fancy for now, read up some lesson on metronomes I guess?), like some chord switching with metronome, some scale improvisation.
my MG15DFX has a button that simulates the sound of one of the expensive tube marshall amps


Fender Stratocaster HSS
LTD EC-400AT
Traynor YCV-50 Blue
Peavey Envoy 110

Wishlist: Hamer USA Explorer, Gibson Explorer
#10
i didny say i could sweep some insane solo i said basic seeping for a reason im talking basic E12 A10 D12 G10 B12 e10 not madness like synyster solo's or yngwie malmsteen and you're right i didnt go from smoke to bat country i went from smoke to iron man to in da gada da vita so on and so forth
#11
Here is a warm-up that Michael Angelo Batio taught in Speed Kills 2. I put a short version of it into Guitar Pro 5 and exported to an image for you. I usually use 16th notes at 120bpm but any speed is good to warmup at. Each different finger position is designed to be played up the neck until it's 12 frets higher. Play that before you play and your fingers might get quicker.
Last edited by tenfold at Jan 17, 2009,
#12
If you practiced guitar like you practiced Rock Band you'd be good. Practicing for ten minutes a day and thinking you can play because Rock Band "built your stamina" is ridiculous. Sorry to laugh at you, but.... Wait. Are you just messing about trying to incite people? I bet you're trolling for reactions. Lol! Good one.
Last edited by gtmom at Jan 18, 2009,
#13
Come on people, stop harassing him. Sure, rock band is nothing like real guitar but it's helped his muscle memory and stamina a little bit.

@zwagni: Try to write with correct grammar because it's quite hard to read a sentence that's a half page long.
Do the warmup twice every time before you play guitar.
Stop playing rock band so much and play guitar for at least an houra day. If you have time for 6-8 hours of a game, I think you have just as much or close to the same amount of time for a real guitar; plus it's a lot more fun once you're good.
Most of the songs you mentioned have easy barre chords or 5th intervals in them. Try some new ones with unique riffs, no barre chords. Michael Angelo's Speed Kills 1, 2, and 3 are great for learning advanced techniques and exercises that anyone can play at any tempo. His Star Licks and Speed Lives are great also. You should buy them.