#1
so, whenever my music teacher at school gives us music it has the treble cleff and bass cleff (because it is mostly piano music), and on each it has a time signature, i had an idea not to long ago to make the treble cleff say 2/4 and make the bass cleff 4/4 (simplified idea, i actually wanted to do the treble cleff in 3/8 and the bass in 4/4).

is this acceptable, or would a pianist just laugh at me?
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#4
It's impossible to have two time sgnatures in one bar. It would be polyrhythmic with one line playing triplet and one playing duple.
breaking hearts
&
breaking guitars
#5
Id say it wouldnt work. Everything would keep going in and out of time and it would just be weird.
#6
i've heard of polyrhythms before, but never quite understood them.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#7
yeah, if you wanted to write a polyrhythmic piece, you'd write in one time signature, but as if it was two. So the bars themselves would match up, eg if one is in 4/4 and the other in 3/8 you'd have 2 "bars" and a beat for every bar of music
#8
The only place I've seen it is Tchaikovsky's Serenade in C. It's in 6/8, but at one point in the intoductory theme the cellos and basses (the violins echo the motif later) go to 2/4 for a bar.
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab
#11
ridiculously hard to write, read, and play...

but when it's done right it sounds amazing...
#13
i had a percussion piece last year that had stuff in 3/4 and a few of us in the ensemble had 6/8. like a few people already said. its very hard to write while at the same time making it work out so that its pleasing to the ear.
#15
it wouldn't work because each bar would last different lengths, surely? It would be ridiculously difficult to read.
#16
it wouldn't work because each bar would last different lengths


That would be the whole point of using two different time signature.

TS: It's completely unnecessary is this case. It would accomplish nothing by making it nearly impossible to read.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
i'm just curious thats all. i wanted to make some strange compositions with some different composing techniques not usually used.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#20
Listen to Meshuggah.
Quote by ChemicalFire
The point of underground bands is their not popular or famous most of the time. Thus there is a good chance they suck.
#21
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
the drums in Kashmir are 3/4s and the guitar is 4/4ths, that's what makes it so dramatic.


The drums are in 4/4 I think..
Just look at the 4/4 part with the descending riff.
The main riff is in 3/4 though, so that when that part ends the riff has already started, and it confuses you like hell...

Black dog is in 4/4, except a 3/4 bar, and a 9/8 part I think (guitar)..


As for me, using 2 different time signatures confuses you a lot, some times you can't keep the rhythm and end up dissoriented, but well, if you like it do it...
#22
Polyrhythms aren't that uncommon on piano, but you wouldn't notate it with two different time signatures.

Random example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Elox0npFTGI

That's 4 versus 3 all the way through, but both hands are in 2/2. You use triplets, quadruplets, hextuplets etc. to notate it.

But yes, you absolutely can have the hands playing in different times.
#23
Well that is entirely possible and used in music, its just difficult to play.

Sidenote: There is also time signatures that can be something like 3/8 4/4 which will have a 3/8 bar and then a 4/4 bar for the entire song
Kramer Striker FR-424
Fender Starcaster
Roland Cube 30
Roland Mini Cube

Digitech RP90
Squier P-Bass (Insanely modded)
Fender Rumble 15
#24
Quote by aradine
so, whenever my music teacher at school gives us music it has the treble cleff and bass cleff (because it is mostly piano music), and on each it has a time signature, i had an idea not to long ago to make the treble cleff say 2/4 and make the bass cleff 4/4 (simplified idea, i actually wanted to do the treble cleff in 3/8 and the bass in 4/4).

is this acceptable, or would a pianist just laugh at me?


The pianist might laugh at you mainly because of the flow of the bars.Unless he is very squint it won't work... unless you keep your treble in 4/4 with an accent on every third eighth to make him happy. You'll know what you attempted and perhaps he would too, but nonetheless your piece would now be comprehensible to a non-squint.

And although its not wise to talk about drummers in a guitar column, I really do wonder about Virgil Donati. In one demo each limb is playing in a different time sig, or rather accenting different beats. For example: Left foot every 8th note/ right foot every 3rd 16th/ left arm every dotted half note/ right arm swing 16ths. The man is a genius.

Anyway, I hope my first paragraph helped you out.. good luck