#1
HI,

I've been playing 4 months. I can finger-pick or pick and have done some appregiating. I have seen a lot of acoustic covers on Youtube and they do stuff like add chords or sus chords. I do it when I chord change out of a D all the time and it sounds good. It sounds really cool and doesn't seem overly difficult. But, is there a rule, like if you're playing A, what are the good chords to work with?
#2
There are no 'rules', if it sounds good then it is good.
#3
Quote by Free
There are no 'rules', if it sounds good then it is good.

Of course there are rules. Depending on the key you're playing in, you can use some chords and not others. It's a whole bunch of theory, so I can't just explain it in here. However, in a couple of weeks I will be writing an article on this!

Cheers!
#4
Quote by ZeGuitarist
Of course there are rules. Depending on the key you're playing in, you can use some chords and not others.


There are no 'rules', if it sounds good then it is good.
#5
Quote by Free
There are no 'rules', if it sounds good then it is good.

You will find that not following the basic rules of music theory will result in your music NOT SOUNDING GOOD. I said basic rules, because you can experiment with exotic sounds to see if it sounds good, but if your foundation doesn't go by a couple of simple rules, it will sound like ass.

EDIT: Of course, what you are saying applies the same logic, only the other way around:
- I say: if you follow the rules of music theory, it will sound good.
- You say: if it sounds good, then it follows the rules of music theory.

Last edited by ZeGuitarist at Jan 17, 2009,
#6
Quote by krazybartender
HI,

I've been playing 4 months. I can finger-pick or pick and have done some appregiating. I have seen a lot of acoustic covers on Youtube and they do stuff like add chords or sus chords. I do it when I chord change out of a D all the time and it sounds good. It sounds really cool and doesn't seem overly difficult. But, is there a rule, like if you're playing A, what are the good chords to work with?

It depends on several things really - the melody of the song , what chords are next to each other and also the effect you're trying to achieve

You can both reinforce or destabilise a chord by adding extra tones or replacing the existing ones. Replacing the 3rd with another 5th will give you a big, bold sounding chord with a more neutral tonality, turning a chord into a sus4 will give you a sense of, well, suspense! If you add a tone to a chord that jars with the melody line then it's likely to sound awkward, that doesn't always mean it won't sound good but it's something you need to keep in mind. As far as "neighbours" go, certain chord variations can be used to imply the next chord that follows, and likewise to lead on from the previous chord. A common example of this is playing the dominant 7th variation of the V chord when resolving back to the root, like this...

Instead of

C F

you'd go

C C7 F

There's no extra chords in there as such, you just change the C chord to a C7 before you move to the F.
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#7
Quote by ZeGuitarist

- I say: if you follow the rules of music theory, it will sound good.
- You say: if it sounds good, then it follows the rules of music theory.


Thats not what I'm saying. But at the risk of repeating myself...... (cba) we'll agree to disagree.
#8
Quote by Free
Thats not what I'm saying. But at the risk of repeating myself...... (cba) we'll agree to disagree.

A mature debater
#9
Quote by ZeGuitarist
You will find that not following the basic rules of music theory will result in your music NOT SOUNDING GOOD. I said basic rules, because you can experiment with exotic sounds to see if it sounds good, but if your foundation doesn't go by a couple of simple rules, it will sound like ass.

EDIT: Of course, what you are saying applies the same logic, only the other way around:
- I say: if you follow the rules of music theory, it will sound good.
- You say: if it sounds good, then it follows the rules of music theory.



There really aren't any "rules" of music theory at all though. It's entirely descriptive. It has conventions, but not rules. Think of Bach, one of the most popular composers of all time. His music was highly chromatic. It hardly followed the "rules" of theory.
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#11
Quote by ZeGuitarist
Of course there are rules. Depending on the key you're playing in, you can use some chords and not others. It's a whole bunch of theory, so I can't just explain it in here. However, in a couple of weeks I will be writing an article on this!

Cheers!

I suggest don't make an article. I don't want to read an article with false information.
#12
Somehow using the world "rule" in music was not a good idea. What I meant was, are there any "guidelines" or "suggestions".
#13
Of course there are rules! A major scale follows a specific pattern of tones and semi-tones, as does a minor as does a minor-penta, etc, etc.

Triad chords are built be using the first, third and fifth notes of the scale, minor chords by flattening the third note - all rules!!

But if course rules are there to be broken.

Going back to your last post, perhaps slide to a note quickly before a change, try some hammers/pulls before the change, open strings - just roll with it ...
#14
Quote by krazybartender
Somehow using the world "rule" in music was not a good idea. What I meant was, are there any "guidelines" or "suggestions".

I agree with you. I think theory explains music. It does not write music.
#15
You need to learn scales. Scales will tell you what chords fit within a key and if they are major or minor or etc.

For instance D Major would contain these chords:

Dmaj7, Em7, F#m7, Gmaj7, A7, Bm7, C#7(b5)

Your probably wondering how I came up with this. I'm not really that good at explaining it so just search for a basic lesson of major scales. I don't wanna try to explain it and confuse you (or myself lol)