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#1
All the advice I've read on this part of the forum in regards to anchoring has been one-sided and singleminded- DON'T anchor.
Anchoring creates unnecessary tension that can damage your hand. It also restricts your range of movement and makes unnecessary friction on your skin from the bridge and guitar strings.
But this is only if you are using it for your typical electric guitar styles. The majority of the best electric guitar players that DON'T anchor have been shredders. Shredders.
Now, its obvious that not everyone wants to shred. What if you want to be playing some bluegrass with some serious hybrid picking?
Anchor away. Anchor on the bridge with your palm so you have your three extra fingers free to chicken pick to your heart's content.
Small string skips? Like the type where the skip is only done once and the melody ends up back on the same string that you were picking before?
Anchor. Anchor and hybrid pick... for the duration of the string skip anyway.

My point is this. Anchor when anchoring is needed. Learn to play both styles, or you'll cripple and restrict your technique drastically.
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#2
Quote by rusty-knives

But this is only if you are using it for your typical electric guitar styles. The majority of the best electric guitar players that DON'T anchor have been shredders. Shredders.


I can see why. "Shredding" requires very solid technique, enough to withstand great speeds without falling apart. The majority of successful shredders approach guitar-playing in the most natural and logical way possible, and "anchoring" is not natural.

Quote by rusty-knives

Now, its obvious that not everyone wants to shred.


"Shredding" is simply guitar-playing with heavy technical demands, at high speeds. It's not like your actual playing technique changes.

Quote by rusty-knives

What if you want to be playing some bluegrass with some serious hybrid picking?
Anchor away. Anchor on the bridge with your palm so you have your three extra fingers free to chicken pick to your heart's content.


Playing unanchored allows you the use of all fingers. I don't see your point here.

Quote by rusty-knives

Small string skips? Like the type where the skip is only done once and the melody ends up back on the same string that you were picking before?
Anchor. Anchor and hybrid pick... for the duration of the string skip anyway.


String skipping? I can't think of any better reason NOT to anchor. Skipping around requires mobility, which anchoring reduces.

Quote by rusty-knives

My point is this. Anchor when anchoring is needed. Learn to play both styles, or you'll cripple and restrict your technique drastically.


Anchoring is never needed. Anything that can be done anchoring can be done unanchored, with less tension. Give one valid example that proves otherwise.

BTW, read the sticky in this forum about anchoring.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jan 17, 2009,
#3
Quote by fixationdarknes
I can see why. "Shredding" requires very solid technique, enough to withstand great speeds without falling apart. The majority of successful shredders approach guitar-playing in the most natural and logical way possible, and "anchoring" is not natural.


"Shredding" is simply guitar-playing with heavy technical demands, at high speeds. It's not like your actual playing technique changes.


Playing unanchored allows you the use of all fingers. I don't see your point here.


String skipping? I can't think of any better reason NOT to anchor. Skipping around requires mobility, which anchoring reduces.


Anchoring is never needed. Anything that can be done anchoring can be done unanchored.


This pretty much covers it all. Anchoring is never a good idea. EVER. And resting your hand on the bridge i don't think counts as anchoring. Anchoring means you HAVE to touch the guitar in a certain place to play it. Your 'restricting yourself' comment is stupid. You'll definitely be restricted when you've got carpal tunnel and sore arms. Look at MAB, man that's gotta hurt.

Anyway. I'll sit back and wait for this thread to be closed.
#4
^ I can do both anchoring and no anchoring at slow and fast speeds; so I don't really care if 1 anchors or not

I must admit, at ultra high speeds I don't anchor.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 17, 2009,
#5
It still counts as anchoring if you've got your palm on the bridge.
For Hybrid picking it's a hell of a lot more efficient.


String skipping? I can't think of any better reason NOT to anchor. Skipping around requires mobility, which anchoring reduces.


By the way, I was talking a single string skip, once. It's a lot faster and easier to learn if you're just anchoring for that one moment, and using your other fingers to pick that other string. As soon as that part of the lick stops, stop anchoring.


"Shredding" is simply guitar-playing with heavy technical demands, at high speeds. It's not like your actual playing technique changes.


I disagree. When you learn to play a lick at a fast tempo, it becomes hard to play it at the slower tempo. Technique change? I think so.

And I both anchor and don't. I'm just saying, anchor where appropriate. Like, for Classical music maybe? You don't have to get your shred head panties in a bunch.
Quote by sheumack111
I allways found that having sex while listening to Tool/Planet X/Dream Theater was hard because every time you tryed o keep the beat they would change time sig, then you would get pissed off and then loose your mojo for the nite.....

I fucking Lol'd
Last edited by rusty-knives at Jan 17, 2009,
#6
Quote by rusty-knives
It still counts as anchoring if you've got your palm on the bridge.
For Hybrid picking it's a hell of a lot more efficient.


By the way, I was talking a single string skip, once. It's a lot faster and easier to learn if you're just anchoring for that one moment, and using your other fingers to pick that other string. As soon as that part of the lick stops, stop anchoring.


I disagree. When you learn to play a lick at a fast tempo, it becomes hard to play it at the slower tempo. Technique change? I think so.

And I both anchor and don't. I'm just saying, anchor where appropriate. Like, for Classical music maybe? You don't have to get your shred head panties in a bunch.


That means your technique is faulty. Vai, MAB, all those guys are constantly extolling that your playing at high speed should be exactly the same as at low speed.
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#7
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
That means your technique is faulty. Vai, MAB, all those guys are constantly extolling that your playing at high speed should be exactly the same as at low speed.


Excuse me? Are you trying to say that these players are 100% infallible?
I don't think so. It takes extra concentration and consideration to play at slower speeds, no matter who it is that is playing. Whether or not you're aware of this, it means that you are changing your technique.
Quote by sheumack111
I allways found that having sex while listening to Tool/Planet X/Dream Theater was hard because every time you tryed o keep the beat they would change time sig, then you would get pissed off and then loose your mojo for the nite.....

I fucking Lol'd
#8
Anything that is achievable with anchoring is achievable without anchoring, full stop. You'll be faster if you don't anchor, and you will be better protected against risks like carpal tunnel syndrome. Don't anchor, for christ's sake.
#9
Excuse me? Are you trying to say that these players are 100% infallible?




You tell em! Aside from very small subtle changes, your technique playing slow and fast - and everywhere in between - should be exactly the same. There's loads of problems that can be fixed just by understanding that statement - and it's not just Vai and MAB and Romeo and Gilbert that would recommend that - it's basically the foundation of practice for technique on any instrument.

Anyway, TS, the points you make are mostly centered on this hilarious idea that you need your palm on the bridge to fingerpick.

If you can come up with some reasoning and then send it to Paco de Lucia, Albert Lee, Brett Garsed and Marshall Harrison, I'm sure they'd be pleased to hear how you've proved them less than a 100% infallible once again!
#10
Quote by rusty-knives
Excuse me? Are you trying to say that these players are 100% infallible?
I don't think so. It takes extra concentration and consideration to play at slower speeds, no matter who it is that is playing. Whether or not you're aware of this, it means that you are changing your technique.


Technique is the physical act of playing the guitar. How would that change along with concentration levels? You, my friend, are talking bollocks.

On your string skip point. It sounds to me like you're saying go from playing unanchored, anchor, play note, unanchor. How is that more economical than ust picking the note?
#12
Quote by Freepower
Aside from very small subtle changes, your technique playing slow and fast - and everywhere in between - should be exactly the same.


Yeah, the whole benefit of practicing slow depends upon this principle.

I don't want to add to another huge anchoring vs no anchoring debate, and I can only speak to rock based electric guitar playing because it's all I know. But anyway, in my experience, anything more than very slight anchoring is detrimental because it limits your freedom of motion.
#13
Quote by rusty-knives

I disagree. When you learn to play a lick at a fast tempo, it becomes hard to play it at the slower tempo. Technique change? I think so.


If this is your scenario, then you are not practicing correctly. It has nothing to do with anchoring.

Quote by rusty-knives

I'm just saying, anchor where appropriate. Like, for Classical music maybe? You don't have to get your shred head panties in a bunch.


No one's getting his/her panties in a bunch. You're the one who made this thread and called people fools for advising guitarists to not anchor.
#16
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
John Petrucci anchors.

Yeah, but his technique is flawed. He CAN play super-fast and clean, but his hand is scrunched up a lot of the time, meaning it's tense.
Call me Batman.
#17
Quote by J.A.M
Yeah, but his technique is flawed. He CAN play super-fast and clean, but his hand is scrunched up a lot of the time, meaning it's tense.


Can't be too flawed if he can play like that.

Classical guitar is supposed to be play anchored?

Would playing unanchored be like Awesomepussom5? Just better?
#18
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
Can't be too flawed if he can play like that.

Classical guitar is supposed to be play anchored?

Would playing unanchored be like Awesomepussom5? Just better?


John Petrucci is an exception, not a rule. Every time I see him play, I am honestly astounded that he doesn't have carpal tunnel syndrome by now.

And no, classical guitarists do not anchor.
Quote by dudetheman
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Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#19
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
John Petrucci anchors.


And Pistorius has missing legs. That doesn't make prosthetic legs the ideal option.
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jan 17, 2009,
#20
Quote by fixationdarknes
And Pistorius has missing legs. That doesn't make prosthetic legs the ideal option.


But it proves that anchoring doesn't flaw your technique.
#21
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
But it proves that anchoring doesn't flaw your technique.


John Petrucci would be better (and faster, for what it counts) if he didn't anchor.

Seriously. This has been discussed a bajillion times. Read the anchoring sticky.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


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#22
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
But it proves that anchoring doesn't flaw your technique.


If you don't consider prosthetic legs flawed, then I don't think anything I say will convince you that anchoring limits your playing.

And actually, an analogy doesn't prove anything. It was a way of explaining that something done really well with a handicap is still handicapped. Pistorius competes in the paralympics for that reason.
#23
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
But it proves that anchoring doesn't flaw your technique.


I think it proves someone can work through it, but if you compare Gilbert, Satch and Vai with Petrucci, MAB and Malmsteen, who looks more comfortable when playing? It's not just about having technique with which you can play fast (in Petrucci's case despite it, not because of it), it's also about staying safe and injury free.
#24
Quote by Ikonoklast
I think it proves someone can work through it, but if you compare Gilbert, Satch and Vai with Petrucci, MAB and Malmsteen, who looks more comfortable when playing? It's not just about having technique with which you can play fast (in Petrucci's case despite it, not because of it), it's also about staying safe and injury free.


Satch is said to have a flawed picking technique too, you can see him having to rest after fast runs.

MAB doesn't looked stressed at all, he has proved that he can flawlessly sweep/alternate pick for 5 minuites straight with No Boundaries.
Malmsteen I dunno, his face is always tucked behind his hair.
I've never seen or heard Petrucci play, I'm just rolling with info from DT fans.

Gilbert is the most relaxed player that I've ever seen.
#25
MAB anchors, but his technique is very unorthodox. As far as I can tell, his playing is surprisingly tension-free.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#26
Anchor if you want, or don't. Many famous people anchor. I anchor, too... My hand has never hurt as a result, and I don't prefer to speed pick, so it is never an issue for me... just as I have never heard of anyone else's hand hurting specifically because of anchoring. It's all a matter of opinion, as far as I am concerned, and I have not seen anything anywhere scientific saying that it's bad or 'incorrect'. To me, anchoring vs. not anchoring is as debatable as speed picking vs. tapping for speed - it's all subjective!
#27
You've never heard Petrucci!? He's not that good, IMO. His music is boring.

MAB is a good player but to actually look at his right hand makes mine ache, it looks that tenses.

Gilbert is my favourite player at the moment. Apart from being a nice-guy, he's a quality player and his songs are inventive. He's uber relaxed when playing, but in my opinion (even thought i don't like his music) Shawn Lane is the most relaxed person you'll ever see!
#28
Jason Becker< who i think everyone can agree is fast as hell, anchored horribly. There's a vid of him playing a Paginini piece on youtube where he goes lightning fast the entire time, and it sounds great, he anchors so horribly, confusing as hell. He also admitted that he was the wrong person to look to for technique purposes. Anchoring is bad though, if you don't wish to become some insane shredder, like Rusty Cooley, and feel satisfied with your technique anchoring is fine then, but you should understand that not anchoring will often allow you to prgoress farther.

Example: Petrucci's top nps is somewhere around 16 i believe.

Rusty Cooley's is around 23.

(*is fairly certain cooley doesn't anchor, for fear of destroy his own arguement*)

and TS, you should listen to Freepower, he seems to know pretty much everything, and has been answering questions about anchoring since forever

Edit: sorry for the rant
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#29
Petrucci's picking technique flawed? Don't think so, his alternate picking have to be the best of at least, one of the best out there. Also, i don't think his hand get very tense when shredding (a DT concert can last up to 3 1/2 hour), may be it looks like it, but is very hard to know just by looking.
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#30
... y'all are still arguing about this? It's like saying orange juice is better than grape juice, as far as I'm concerned... as far as speed, I see the 'not anchoring' point, but not otherwise. There are too many people who anchor - and are famous/well-respected - for them to all be considered 'exceptions to the rule', thus making the argument pretty moot.

... where is the 'rule book' that says one must not anchor? Just curious, as I have heard little on this issue from fellow teachers and such. I'm not for or against it, I was just wondering who put it in people's heads that it was 'incorrect', as opposed to 'not as economical'...
#31
John Petrucci isn't that super clean as you might think.

HE just has a very steady rhythm, so even if he hits in between notes and chromatics, it will still sound right because he's perfectly in time. (slow down recording for the slop unveiled).

His right hand is uber sick, but his left/right hand syncronisation in faster runs isn't as good as say Al Di Meola.

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#32
there is no right or wrong way to play guitar. period. look at how weird marty friedman picks.
#33
Quote by urrynater86
there is no right or wrong way to play guitar. period. look at how weird marty friedman picks.


He's also not considered the best by too many people.

There isn't right or wrong, but scientifically + physically there is better or worse.
#34
Quote by El Cumanés
Petrucci's picking technique flawed? Don't think so, his alternate picking have to be the best of at least, one of the best out there. Also, i don't think his hand get very tense when shredding (a DT concert can last up to 3 1/2 hour), may be it looks like it, but is very hard to know just by looking.


John Petrucci visibly relaxes at the end of every fast run. Watch clips from Rock Discipline, you can practically feel his tendons spazzing.
Quote by dudetheman
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#35
play how you want to play. it's your guitar... your hands.

Just remember that playing with tension can lead to problems. Stay relaxed, let your hand move freely.

I agree that the anti-anchoring rhetoric here is a bit to strong, and often misinformed (to what anchoring actually is).
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 17, 2009,
#36



Not trying to backseat mod, just made me lol.
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#37
Okay this is ridiculous. Anchoring/not anchoring is hardly the most important factor of a guitarist's success. It is simply one of the factors. It adds tension, among other things. If you want to anchor, GO AHEAD AND DO SO. But when people make threads asking for insight on the matter, of course we're going to tell them to not anchor. Then we get accused of bigotry, when we're simply offering input that was asked of us.

Quote by Rickjames730


Not trying to backseat mod, just made me lol.


Yeah... what a tiresome subject. Holy hell...
#39
There is no benifits from anchoring. Shawn Lane had the most relaxed and fasted hands possible.
#40
^ That's the kind of comment that causes arguing. Now someone will reply with "BUT DUDE JOHN PETRUCCI AND MAB ANCHOR AND ARE SO GOOD THEREFORE I WILL DO SO TOO"

...oh wait, those replies were already made
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