#1
One last noob question for today!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZYI924KhTc&feature=PlayList&p=253192EED47525A8&playnext=1&index=8

i get everything up to 13.52, but i dont understand what the connection is when you apply the sharps and flats to the circle. The father charles battle ends thing is useful but is there any pattern in relation to the sharps and flats?


Also why is it father charles goes down and ends battle then fsharp csharp? He introduced these earlier than the other sharps.
Last edited by Zbigniev at Jan 17, 2009,
#2
The Circle of fifths is just a way of arranging keys in a logical order. It's also used in harmonic progressions, as almost all progressions encountered in traditional harmony are derived from the logic that gives us this chart.

Ok, we'll start with C major at the top of the circle of fifths. C major has no flats or sharps. Now, if we go a perfect fifth either side of this, we get F major and G major. F is a perfect fifth down from C (anti-clockwise on the chart), G is a perfect fifth up from C (clockwise). F major has one flat and G major has one flat. Make sense so far? Now if we go one step further, we get to Bb major, and D major. D is two perfect fifths up (clockwise), and Bb is two perfect fifths down (anticlockwise). See a pattern? Going down in perfect fifths from C, you get keys with more flats, and going up in fifths from C, you get keys with more sharps. The number of steps you go clockwise or anticlockwise from C is the number of flats or sharps added.

Now to answer your question, yes F# and C# are the first sharps added, but that is not how it works. A scale starting on F# has 6#s, a scale starting on C# has 7#s (C# major is often written as Db major, as they are enharmonic, and Db has 5 flats - less of a headache than 7#s). In both of these scales, the "newest" sharps added are E# and B#, respectively.
#3
Quote by National_Anthem
The Circle of fifths is just a way of arranging keys in a logical order. It's also used in harmonic progressions, as almost all progressions encountered in traditional harmony are derived from the logic that gives us this chart.

Ok, we'll start with C major at the top of the circle of fifths. C major has no flats or sharps. Now, if we go a perfect fifth either side of this, we get F major and G major. F is a perfect fifth down from C (anti-clockwise on the chart), G is a perfect fifth up from C (clockwise). F major has one flat and G major has one flat. Make sense so far? Now if we go one step further, we get to Bb major, and D major. D is two perfect fifths up (clockwise), and Bb is two perfect fifths down (anticlockwise). See a pattern? Going down in perfect fifths from C, you get keys with more flats, and going up in fifths from C, you get keys with more sharps. The number of steps you go clockwise or anticlockwise from C is the number of flats or sharps added.

Now to answer your question, yes F# and C# are the first sharps added, but that is not how it works. A scale starting on F# has 6#s, a scale starting on C# has 7#s (C# major is often written as Db major, as they are enharmonic, and Db has 5 flats - less of a headache than 7#s). In both of these scales, the "newest" sharps added are E# and B#, respectively.


G Major has one sharp.