#1
Well, I don't know if any of you remember my previous posts, but I'm the 15 year-old guitarist with dreams of stardom.

I had planned to do a plain, boring degree in Economics or summat, to leave career paths open, and to enable me to take any kind of job, while starting a band and seeing how far I could take it.

But after some thinking, I was considering doing a music degree, with a view of possibly helping my musician career, or just opening up careers in other music-related areas.

How useful is a music degree? I know Chris took a degree in classical guitar, but I can't remember how useful that was to him, and I wanted to know if any of you other guys had done any.


Also, in the long run, how important is a high school (15-18 years old) band? In terms of making adult bands easier, etc. Just because I'm starting to get extremely stressed with getting mine off the ground, and I wanted to know whether it was worth the hassle.

Cheers
#2
Unless you want to teach, it's not that helpful.
Do you feel warm within your cage?

And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
Quote by Hydra150
There's a dick on Earth, too
It's you
#3
I'm in the same boat as you. In high school, unsure if I want to pursue a major in music or another field.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#4
I don't think a study i musi will get you anywhere...just be a band and do other things...i wanna be a bartender, poker dealer, cook, carpenter and keep my desire for music always ,an so I'd od that f'i were you
#5
Doing a music degree is really mostly going to help with learning to teach guitar unless you attend MI, GIT, or Berklee's. Leave your options open and do what you originally planned to do. Trust me, I've consulted many people concerning this very thing because I'm graduating this year. Let your band be a side thing while you make actual money and you may be able to afford to buy recording equipment and probably get big.
In response to my admission of Virginity:
Quote by RPGoof
We're all virgins here, don't worry.
#6
It's not going to matter much as far as becoming a rock star goes. Law firms look at all the graduates of Harvard and Duke Law Schools, but record companies don't look at people graduating with music degrees. A college degree isn't all that important as far as becoming a rock star goes. Your degree will allow you to teach or do more low profile jobs as a musician. It won't decrease your chances of stardom, except that you'll be spending time studying rather than writing original rock songs and practicing with your band, though the theory and discipline you gain from a music degree may help.

What's weird is that many people have college degrees that have nothing to do with their work. Honestly, if you kick ass in your music classes, you can go to law school with a music degree (or a degree in any field). Likewise, you could complete the requirements for medical school (PM me if this interests you...or anyone PM me about this if you want) while getting a BA in music theory. Contrary to popular belief, you don't need a biology degree to go to med school. Biology, biochemistry, and chemistry majors are the most common applicants to med school, but a guy I know has a math degree and an MD and I plan on getting a math degree and then an MD and maybe a PhD in a related field (probably applied math or bio/chemical engineering, though I'm going with more of a pure math degree rather than applied right now).

Additionally, you could go into the regular business world with a music degree. You could get a music degree and then an MBA if the rock star thing doesn't work out. What many companies want, aside from the positions that require a specific set of knowledge like an actuary, is someone who can work hard and get things done. Music is a hard degree, right up there with math and engineering (especially electrical engineering). If you do well with that degree, you'll show grad schools and employers that you can do hard work.

I do suggest that you double-major, minor, or at least take some classes in a more useful subject as far as employment goes, such as economics or finance.