#1
Hi

I'm thinking of removing the bridge pickup cover on my epiphone G-400, to try to add a bit of bite to the tone (i've managed to get rid of the mud and make it sound reasonable already, but it's still not sounding how a bridge pickup should sound in my opinion). I've heard this does work, but can make the pickup more susceptible to hum even though it's a humbucker, and exposes the coil to environmental damage.

Extra hum doesn't bother me, but i don't wanna shorten the life of the pickup. So is there a way i can remove the cover but still protect the pickup?

I also need a bit of guidance on this, before i do it - firstly the best way of getting the cover off the pickup, as it is soldered.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#2
Remove the solder.

No it isn't bad for the pickup, it will protected just fine.
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#3
Quote by Øttər
Remove the solder.

No it isn't bad for the pickup, it will protected just fine.

can't that melt the bobbins a bit? (me + soldering iron = fail)
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
You're right about the hum/damage part, but look at how many open-coil pups from the 80s are still kicking ass.

Don't worry about damage. Just keep swords and propane torches away from it.

Get a 60w iron (or better yet a 120w gun) and melt the solder. The bobbins will prolly be encased in a cube of wax. Just scrape it away.

That's it. Just watch the heat. It'll only take a few seconds with the 120w soldering gun.
#5
Ok, i'll probably do this today, but before i do, is the difference really that much?
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#6
i just tried this and i only have a 25 watt soldering iron :S what other alternatives can i use to remove this solder joint?

edit:nvm i sawed it off - job done
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
Last edited by Blompcube at Feb 8, 2009,
#7
You need at least 80 watts for ROHS compliant pickkups. The solder they use has a very high melting temp.
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#8
hey, im thinking about doing this with my guitar, and its the same guitar btw
has it made much difference in tone?
cheers
kris
#9
Quote by blackstratshred
hey, im thinking about doing this with my guitar, and its the same guitar btw
has it made much difference in tone?
cheers
kris

Basically, the covers round off the treble, giving them an overall softer feel which is quite nice on the neck pickup, but tends to muffle the high end too much on the bridge pickup giving it a muddy sound, especially with epiphone stock pickups. if you remove the cover, it's not a huge difference, you just get a bit more bite, but even though it's only a small change, it can really bring the pickup to life. It no longer sounds muddy, anyway.

This guitar is my first guitar, and i've recently started making it more and more "my own", so far i've had a push/pull phase invert pot installed, rotated the neck pickup (this seems to give the middle position on the pickup selector a slightly more woody tone while in phase, and a less harsh sound out of phase, somehow), and removed the bridge pickup cover. The next modification will be to install a prototype of a tremolo unit that indie guitars might be manufacturing in future - i'm told it can divebomb with perfect tuning stability without needing a locking nut/tuners.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.