#1
I realized a week ago that what I've been doing with my new Washburn guitar that I got a month ago was just playing around but not practicing... sort of.
I was playing simplified versions of Sunshine of you Love, White Room, Purple Haze, Iron Man, Ain't Talkin Bout Love, and so on.
I can play Seven Nation Army very well (which is nothing to you veterans out there) and figured out how to play the bass part in the beginning of the riff with just palmmuting harder.
I enjoy Sunshine of Your Love, and I think I'm okay with it.
Still a novice though, a real newb, when I noticed that I tried the usual chord progressions and noticed I can't switched between C, G, and F at all.
I can do C to G7, but can't come back.

The real problem: can't press the G string at all, even reaching it is difficult.
I can do it, but it's painful and I have to concentrait to not let it buzz.
I had a deja vu at that moment three years ago in science class where we measured our hand-span, and my hand was smaller than most of the girls'.
I have small hands, that's the truth.

I guess I should practice, what do you guys think?
#2
as you practice more and more, your fingers will get used to it, and your fingers will become stronger, and you'll be able to reach farther.
sex, drugs, and rock and roll have turned into aids, needles, and techno..
#3
Quote by fli.pansy
as you practice more and more, your fingers will get used to it, and your fingers will become stronger, and you'll be able to reach farther.


Are you sure it's not a handicap?

No, seriously, I really should take some time practicing more, I spend like 20 minutes every day, which may be enough.
I mean, it was just the end of semester at school so I was struggling with the work.
#4
dont let small hands get you down. i have small hands and while it does stop you from doing some things i have found it gives more integrity and originality to your own style by forcing you to do things a different way. eg tapping a high note that you cant reach.
#5
Quote by radomu
Are you sure it's not a handicap?

No, seriously, I really should take some time practicing more, I spend like 20 minutes every day, which may be enough.
I mean, it was just the end of semester at school so I was struggling with the work.


i'm sure it's not a handicap . and i know people who practice 2 hours a day, and still have problems playing. just take your time, and keep practicing.
sex, drugs, and rock and roll have turned into aids, needles, and techno..
#6
Yeah, do your schoolwork before practicing guitar.

But having small hands won't be a problem with practice.

Django Reinhardt only had two fingers on his fretting hand, but he didn't let it stop him!

Just practice when you can, and maybe get into a routine of things you'd like to get better at.
#7
Quote by Rokeman
Yeah, do your schoolwork before practicing guitar.

But having small hands won't be a problem with practice.

Django Reinhardt only had two fingers on his fretting hand, but he didn't let it stop him!

Just practice when you can, and maybe get into a routine of things you'd like to get better at.


Never knew that, but that's amazing.
Problem solved then: practice like hell


and get a lesson...
#8
anyways thanks guys for the great advice

Practice, practice, practice, that's the word
#9
Try stretching you fingers a few times everyday when you aren't doing anything.

Worked for Me.
#10
I have terribly small hands too, but honestly I don't think that has anything to do with my playing, there's only a few people that I personally know that are better than me, but that could just be because I practice a lot, but still

Although the good part of this is, because have short fingers, I have big palms, so my fingers are a lot more powerful, and I can do bends a lot easier
#11
Just practice, practice, practice. They actually are plenty of guitarists out there who have small hands and are just small in general, but still rock (Angus Young is the first one that comes to mind).
#12
Just keep practicing, your hands will stretch and not hurt anymore eventually. It's good to let them burn a decent amount though, so your hands can get a good stretch. Like yoga for your fingers.
#13
Quote by patbuck2
Just practice, practice, practice. They actually are plenty of guitarists out there who have small hands and are just small in general, but still rock (Angus Young is the first one that comes to mind).


really
didn't know that had small hands.
But he's mainly a chord player?
He must be good then.
#14
Many many people play both bass and guitar with small hands. I have managed to do so for 3 plus decades, so anyone can. It takes some concerted practice and good technique. Make scales part of your daily practice and make spider scales a part of your routine.

Good luck--it can be done!
#15
I've got short fingers and just had to learn to play around my problems. I've learned a lot of jazz style chords to make up for my fingers. Oh and practice (like the others have said) doesn't hurt.
#16
Quote by barefootboy
I've got short fingers and just had to learn to play around my problems. I've learned a lot of jazz style chords to make up for my fingers. Oh and practice (like the others have said) doesn't hurt.


Are those the 7th chords?
#17
Quote by radomu
really
didn't know that had small hands.
But he's mainly a chord player?
He must be good then.

Oh yeah. He's such a tiny guy if you compare him to the towering Bon. If watch his hands during live performances they seem so small over that big sg on him.
#18
Quote by patbuck2
Oh yeah. He's such a tiny guy if you compare him to the towering Bon. If watch his hands during live performances they seem so small over that big sg on him.

that's true,he looks like he's hugging onto the sg
#19
Maybe getting a guitar with a smaller neck could be an option? There's more than one type of neck. Try a wizard, or the smallest you can get.

And, when you're beginning, I know it's hard. I've been there. I know what it's like to have to pull your fingers into the chord shape with your picking hand, and think "god, I'll never do this". But, trust me, it gets better. As you work and work at it'll come to you.

Don't give up
#20
I have pretty short fingers, and I found that using a guitar with a thinner neck (not it's width, but it's thickness) helped a lot. I started on a Squier Strat, but once I switched to an Ibanez, I found that it's thinner neck made it much easier for me to get my hand around it, plus gave me a flatter surface to put my thumb for better leverage. The neck was also slightly wider too, which helped with getting my fat fingers in the right spot without hitting other strings. I'm no expert, but that's what worked better for me.
#22
Quote by voodoogmr
I have pretty short fingers, and I found that using a guitar with a thinner neck (not it's width, but it's thickness) helped a lot. I started on a Squier Strat, but once I switched to an Ibanez, I found that it's thinner neck made it much easier for me to get my hand around it, plus gave me a flatter surface to put my thumb for better leverage. The neck was also slightly wider too, which helped with getting my fat fingers in the right spot without hitting other strings. I'm no expert, but that's what worked better for me.


I did get a washburn, which is a sg-type but it does have a thin neck.
Im happy that i didn't get a strat.
#23
I can't help but laugh when guitar players complain about small hands. Plenty of people with small hands play full sized basses, you can manage with your guitar.
#25
Quote by Zycho
I can't help but laugh when guitar players complain about small hands. Plenty of people with small hands play full sized basses, you can manage with your guitar.

I'm a new player too, but:
I once would have thought that you were coming in to the thread, kinda being a ****, and that you were generally right, but whatever.

Now, I realize yeah, you're exactly right. Hand size, unless you have midget baby hands, is an illusion. They feel small due to not being stretched and being forced to move in odd shapes. I remember a G chord basically blowing my mind ("How can people switch to this?!"), but now it's not a big deal at all.

Your hand will adjust, just keep playing.

Quote by radomu
I did get a washburn, which is a sg-type but it does have a thin neck.
Im happy that i didn't get a strat.

I hope you're not happy you didn't get a strat just because of neck size. If you want a strat, get one. You'll asjust in a few months, and if neck size is your only reason for not getting the Strat, you'll feel like an idiot.
Last edited by JustinHorne at Jan 20, 2009,
#26
I also have small and quite stubby(to add to the difficulty -_-') fingers as well. All my friends wonder how I can even play as well as I do. Playing a lot is the key! I'm not one of those people who practice(or even play for that matter) every day anymore, but I used to play a good 6 hours a week for about 6 months. The experience builds up and you'll get those finger stretched out quite nicely.

Best of luck!
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#27
If I had bothered to take lessons and practice more before, I really wouldn't have needed to change to a flatter neck. I just did it out of ignorance. I played a Strat yesterday and I could play it with no problem now that I've been practicing and stretching my fingers. *sigh* Live and learn.
#28
My hands have only grown about half an inch since I was ten (I have a handprint from then) and I'm sixteen now. Thing is, I've only been playing maybe a year and I can really rip (at least I think so ). Hand size doesn't really matter too much.

Also, finger count! Django, the best jazz guitarist of all time, only had full use of two fingers (as mentioned previously). Same thing with Tony Iommi, and those guys are rippers.
#29
Quote by JustinHorne
I'm a new player too, but:
I once would have thought that you were coming in to the thread, kinda being a ****, and that you were generally right, but whatever.

Now, I realize yeah, you're exactly right. Hand size, unless you have midget baby hands, is an illusion. They feel small due to not being stretched and being forced to move in odd shapes. I remember a G chord basically blowing my mind ("How can people switch to this?!"), but now it's not a big deal at all.

Your hand will adjust, just keep playing.


I hope you're not happy you didn't get a strat just because of neck size. If you want a strat, get one. You'll asjust in a few months, and if neck size is your only reason for not getting the Strat, you'll feel like an idiot.


When I upgrade I will get a strat sometime in the future, probably either a Japanese or an American strat if money allows it.
I just didn't get it because I didn't want to start out in such a guitar with a legendary status.

Plus I wanted a humbucking pickup
#30
How old are you? If you start practising stretches at an early age( I was 12/13) they will develop and become bigger and better at stretches. Atleast it worked out that way for me.
#31
Just practice and you will find your fingers can stretch further. As for the buzzing, just practicw will help that, when I first started to teach myself the guitar I had to get y right hand to forcibly press my left hand finger down on the frets, now I don't even have to think about it, just practice.
#32
When you start you have nothing to practice. in ten mins you have repeated everything you know ten times. so practise everything you know and then learn one new thing every day. within a year you will know so much that you won't be able to do it all once over in an hour.

It seems aimless and as if you are making no progress at first but it will happen if yopu stick at it
#33
Quote by radomu
Are those the 7th chords?


Jazz guitarist tend to play fewer strings a lot, for instance.

F vs F
e 1 1
B 1 1
G 2 2
D 3 3
A 1 x
E 1 x

The 2nd being a jazz style chord. That allows me to move my hand to a more comfortable position. I have problems with barre chords that require 3 or more fingers. After playing the jazz chords for awhile, sometimes I can play the regular chord.
#34
Quote by radomu
I realized a week ago that what I've been doing with my new Washburn guitar that I got a month ago was just playing around but not practicing... sort of.
I was playing simplified versions of Sunshine of you Love, White Room, Purple Haze, Iron Man, Ain't Talkin Bout Love, and so on.
I can play Seven Nation Army very well (which is nothing to you veterans out there) and figured out how to play the bass part in the beginning of the riff with just palmmuting harder.
I enjoy Sunshine of Your Love, and I think I'm okay with it.
Still a novice though, a real newb, when I noticed that I tried the usual chord progressions and noticed I can't switched between C, G, and F at all.
I can do C to G7, but can't come back.

The real problem: can't press the G string at all, even reaching it is difficult.
I can do it, but it's painful and I have to concentrait to not let it buzz.
I had a deja vu at that moment three years ago in science class where we measured our hand-span, and my hand was smaller than most of the girls'.
I have small hands, that's the truth.

I guess I should practice, what do you guys think?

i have small hands too mate, but practice and in time you'll be able to do anything anyone can do. Eric Johnson (who is also my idol) doesnt have that biggest hands but what he does with the guitar is amazing. look him up if u already haven't
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