#1
is there a way to go about learning how to play vocal melodies on guitar. I really like solos that sounds like the vocal of that song, and I think it would b a great element to add to my playing. can anybody reccomend some tips to help me figure out how to do this?
Gear:
PRS SE Custom
Takamine G Series Acoustic
Peavey Vypyr 30
Digitech RP 250

Quote by voodoochild23
The only time I'll dance is if Nickelback caught fire and no one helped.
#2
If it is a pop song I would recommend trying the major scale. You'll have to do it by ear though. Right now I am using www.trainear.com to try to learn my intervals. You might also try GNU Solfege or functional ear trainer. They are all free and all have thier own advantages and disadvantages. After doing these for a couple weeks and then learning a few of your scales on guitar, then you should be able to play along with the vocals pretty easily.
#3
listen, thats all i can think of, listen and learn it, then add funky ****e to the melody that isnt in there...
#5
i know a good amount of scales, but i have really only mastered (and i use that term loosely) pentatonic and blues scales. i am also familiar with diatonic scales. what scales should i focus on for learning vocal melodies?
Gear:
PRS SE Custom
Takamine G Series Acoustic
Peavey Vypyr 30
Digitech RP 250

Quote by voodoochild23
The only time I'll dance is if Nickelback caught fire and no one helped.
#6
Whatever scale that you're singing in. It's basically only ever going to be the major or minor scale.
Last edited by BrockTandem at Jan 18, 2009,
#7
aight. also im not a skilled singer. does this put me at a severe disadvantage to learning how to play vocal melodies? i am thinking about taking up vocal lessons soon in order to improve my singing
Gear:
PRS SE Custom
Takamine G Series Acoustic
Peavey Vypyr 30
Digitech RP 250

Quote by voodoochild23
The only time I'll dance is if Nickelback caught fire and no one helped.
#8
Quote by prsrulz91
aight. also im not a skilled singer. does this put me at a severe disadvantage to learning how to play vocal melodies? i am thinking about taking up vocal lessons soon in order to improve my singing


That would be a good idea. Ear training is also really important since you will basically be playing the vocal melody by ear. Intervals sometimes are harder to recognize in voice (at least for me) then on an instrument.
#9
You're basically only ever going to be playing from a selection of eight notes, it's not hard.
#10
Quote by prsrulz91
aight. also im not a skilled singer. does this put me at a severe disadvantage to learning how to play vocal melodies? i am thinking about taking up vocal lessons soon in order to improve my singing
Sort of but not really.

People who are good at hitting notes (with their voice) are better at transcribing. You don't need to be have an awesome tone for a singer, but you probably should sing some scales (with your guitar/piano) so you become better at hitting those notes and listening to those notes.

This thread is probably darrens domain
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        L.
#11
Quote by BrockTandem
You're basically only ever going to be playing from a selection of eight notes, it's not hard.

Possibly less, many vocal melodic phrases are only a few notes. Vocal melodies often move stepwise or in thirds because that's the easiest movement to sing but of course larger leaps create interest and will be present in just about every song.

It's usually based on chord tones. So if you know the chord underneath is G and you're not sure where to start try the notes of the G chord first (G B D).

I've seen plenty of accidentals in vocal melodies so you will come across notes outside the diatonic scales. But don't stress.

If you see an elaboration on a chord. (Say the song calls for a D chord and then a D sus4 for a beat or two then back to the D chord. Or it's on C for a bar then that C is replaced with a Cmaj7 for the next bar.) Look to see if those new notes are a part of the vocal melody, which will often be the case.

Many vocal melodies repeat notes too so don't be afraid of embellishing once you've worked out the main vocal melody.

You don't have to be a great singer but if you can pitch match with your voice it will help.

Good Luck.
Si
#12
Quote by prsrulz91
aight. also im not a skilled singer. does this put me at a severe disadvantage to learning how to play vocal melodies? i am thinking about taking up vocal lessons soon in order to improve my singing
It doesn't matter if you can sing. If you can figure out the notes used in the vocal line, you can play it on your guitar. Watch out for vocal harmonies; they're more common than you think.
#13
You need to have a good musical ear - finding the notes being sung is generally the same as finding a note being played on guitar for me.

Singing can help - you dont have to have a great tone but be able to sing in tune helps for this sort of thing - a lot of people dont realise that singing involves tone just like any guitar does, i.e. you could be singing in tune but still have a bad tone and not sound too good.