#1
Say I choose a key, like Em.

Now I can have a chord progression like G, D, Em. Now to do leads/melodies in these chord progressions I usually choose the G scale if that chord is playing at that time, or the D, etc..

Now this means that I have to learn literally every natural scale of every chord there is...

Hard. Arpeggiating.

How else could I go about doing melodies?
Quote by buddha
isnt there a law against not shaving? thats somewere in our constitution. i think it goes something like a girl maybe be a freak in the sheets but no be wild down stairs is treason and for that she will be beheaded.-good old Benjamin F.

#2
can be that I'm totally mistaken being a compete idiot on theory, but my teacher said something that a mode of a scale can already be another major scale just an octave higher or something like that, so it's not necessary to know them all, just see which ones match partly and use those.
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#3
you can play over all of these chords with e minor(G major), work on improvising over these chords with that scale and you will find a melody you like soon enough.
#5
Yeah a major triad such as G major will be made up of the notes G B D. These three notes are present in three different major scales.
G major (obviously G A B C D E F# G)
C major (C D E F G A B C)
D major (D E F# G A B C)

and three minor scales (the relative minors of the major scales above)
E minor
A minor
B minor

So when playing a G chord any of those scales could "work" over that chord.

If we had a progression in D such as
D Bm A G

well each of these chords uses tones that fit in the D major scale. So we can use the one D major scale to form melodies over the whole progression.

So work out the notes of all the chords and find the matching scale that has all those notes in it.
Si
#6
If your song is in Em, you would use the Em scale.
Neither modes nor G major have anything to do with this.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by 20Tigers
Yeah a major triad such as G major will be made up of the notes G B D. These three notes are present in three different major scales.
G major (obviously G A B C D E F# G)
C major (C D E F G A B C)
D major (D E F# G A B C)

and three minor scales (the relative minors of the major scales above)
E minor
A minor
B minor

So when playing a G chord any of those scales could "work" over that chord.

If we had a progression in D such as
D Bm A G

well each of these chords uses tones that fit in the D major scale. So we can use the one D major scale to form melodies over the whole progression.

So work out the notes of all the chords and find the matching scale that has all those notes in it.


This helps a lot. Thanks man.
Quote by buddha
isnt there a law against not shaving? thats somewere in our constitution. i think it goes something like a girl maybe be a freak in the sheets but no be wild down stairs is treason and for that she will be beheaded.-good old Benjamin F.

#11
Quote by Tophue
he doesnt have to stick to the em scale.

If his song is in the key of E minor and he's playing tonally, what else would you suggest? Like Archeo said, G Major or any modes have nothing to do with it.

E minor is the most reasonable choice. Theres nothing wrong with chromaticism, though.