#1
So, ive recently gotten a new, beautiful american strat. plays great and i love it. but i have noticed there is some real bad buzzing coming from the amp, which is a roland cube 30. it buzzes when i have selected only the middle, bridge, or neck pickup. so when its inbetween theres no substantial noise. I think it may have something to do with my houses electrical setup. i think i recall playing it elsewhere with no buzz.

any suggestions/solutions?

1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#2
They are single coil pickups. They are going to buzz.
GEAR:

Ibanez GSR205FM

Trace Elliot GP7SM 200watt bass combo
#4
you might want to try upgrading the pickups to some better ones that fender offers
#5
Quote by smoots
They are single coil pickups. They are going to buzz.


yea i dont think your right
1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#6
thats the guitar. just the nature of single coil pups. you'll notice when its combining them it doesnt buzz, cuz one is canceling out some of the hum.
#7
could be a grounding issue. Try using some different outlets in the house and see if it gets any better/worse. Could be bad electricity in your house.

Could be a guitar issue too, would have to look and hear it more so to give a more accurate diagnostic.
#8
If you think your house wiring is wrong, spend a few bucks and pick up a wiring tester. These are small devices with the 3-prongs that you plug into an outlet and it lets you know if hot, neutral and ground are wired to the right places. It'll give you some piece of mind and it's something you can carry with you in your guitar kit when you gig. However, I'd have to agree with the others - it's normal. It's the pickups on your guitar causing it. I've got a couple of guitars that do the same thing on certain pickups - they do it on all of my amps and this house is 5 years old. You'll have to live with it. Oh, something that will help is a noise gate. The Boss NS-2 can suppress the noise while you're not playing, but it'll do nothing to stop it while you're playing.
#9
ok thanks and id like to add that the buzzing dissapears when the volume on the guitar is at about 6 or 7 if that helps at all
1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#10
Quote by Lancelundy
Could be bad electricity in your house.



Bad electricity? I'm an electronics technician and have been for over 20 years. Can you explain that one to me?
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jan 18, 2009,
#11
Quote by ldzppln81
yea i dont think your right


then you're retarded. All single coils buzz because they act like antennae, and pick up radio signals, and electrical signals from everywhere. Meaning they're always going to buzz if you're playing in an amp. That's why humbuckers were invented, they're reverse polarized so that the signals that a normal single coil will pick up are cancelled out. it's your pickups, and if you want ones that don't buzz then you have to buy humbuckers or stacked humbuckers.
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!
#12
yup, that's single coils for you... Humbuckers don't do that, I have read it once why that is, but have forgotten it now...
Try noisless pups, or only use position 2 or 4...

EDIT: the guy above me is right, I would like to add that on positions 2 and 4 you get no buzz at all, and that usually, if you are playing, you shouldn't be able to hear the buzz...(except if you're using BrUtAlZZZ DiSTorTions!!!)
Gear:
Fender Jazzmaster
Boss DS-2
Digitech RP150 (with Line6 EX-1 Exp pedal)
Orange Crush 30R


My Youtube Page
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Last edited by poipoi at Jan 18, 2009,
#13
Quote by KG6_Steven
If you think your house wiring is wrong, spend a few bucks and pick up a wiring tester. These are small devices with the 3-prongs that you plug into an outlet and it lets you know if hot, neutral and ground are wired to the right places. It'll give you some piece of mind and it's something you can carry with you in your guitar kit when you gig. However, I'd have to agree with the others - it's normal. It's the pickups on your guitar causing it. I've got a couple of guitars that do the same thing on certain pickups - they do it on all of my amps and this house is 5 years old. You'll have to live with it. Oh, something that will help is a noise gate. The Boss NS-2 can suppress the noise while you're not playing, but it'll do nothing to stop it while you're playing.


cool thanks. roughly how much money is a wiring tester?
i think it may be a combo of the pickups and the wiring possibly because i can swear ive been other places and gotten no buzz. but yea i tried on another amp too. and i also tried it with another guitar and there was no buzz. thanks
1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#14
Quote by muse-ik
then you're retarded. All single coils buzz because they act like antennae, and pick up radio signals, and electrical signals from everywhere. Meaning they're always going to buzz if you're playing in an amp. That's why humbuckers were invented, they're reverse polarized so that the signals that a normal single coil will pick up are cancelled out. it's your pickups, and if you want ones that don't buzz then you have to buy humbuckers or stacked humbuckers.


the reason i said it like that is because that just seemed like to general of a statement that any single coil pickup is going to buzz no matter what. sorry chill
1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#15
Home Depot and Lowes sell them. I'd guestimate somewhere under $20 and probably closer to about $10. You can usually find them in the section that sells the wire nuts, tie straps, wiring tools and meters.
#16
Quote by ldzppln81
the reason i said it like that is because that just seemed like to general of a statement that any single coil pickup is going to buzz no matter what. sorry chill


That's what I'm saying, he's right, any single coil will buzz, but it will be better in some places and worse in others. In general, single coils DO buzz. If you've had one that didn't buzz, it was probably either a stacked humbucker, which is the same size as a single coil, or a fender noiseless, which are absolutely horrible, but still have no buzz (or tone for that matter).
Gear:
Fender Hot Rod Deville 2x12
Custom Built Guitar (made it myself)
PRS SE Soapbar II Maple
Fender Stratacoustic (Stolen! )
Digitech RP200
Boss MT-2
Roland Microcube
I like my stuff!
#17
Quote by muse-ik
That's what I'm saying, he's right, any single coil will buzz, but it will be better in some places and worse in others. In general, single coils DO buzz. If you've had one that didn't buzz, it was probably either a stacked humbucker, which is the same size as a single coil, or a fender noiseless, which are absolutely horrible, but still have no buzz (or tone for that matter).


cool my bad. im just in a pissed mood right now because of this
1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#18
Quote by ldzppln81
but yea i tried on another amp too. and i also tried it with another guitar and there was no buzz. thanks



I have seen instances where the positioning of an amp would induce hum into its signal. We've got Lutron Light Dimmers installed in this house and I've seen them cause hum problems on my Peavey VK112. They're supposed to be filtered to prevent hum, but they still do it. It's a long shot, but when you're hearing the hum, carefully pick up the amp and rotate it. You can also try moving it to a different part of the room. Most likely, this isn't your problem, but it's something to keep in mind for the future.
#19
Quote by KG6_Steven
I have seen instances where the positioning of an amp would induce hum into its signal. We've got Lutron Light Dimmers installed in this house and I've seen them cause hum problems on my Peavey VK112. They're supposed to be filtered to prevent hum, but they still do it. It's a long shot, but when you're hearing the hum, carefully pick up the amp and rotate it. You can also try moving it to a different part of the room. Most likely, this isn't your problem, but it's something to keep in mind for the future.


i will give that a go. and im probably definitely going to buy one of those testers you were talking about. maybe if im real lucky i can get something out of the extended warranty i bought at guitar center. haha sounds like a longshot though
1642 ELEPHANTS LIVE HERE

Bass Gear
Fender Deluxe Jazz Bass (Active Electronics) (MIM)
Ampeg SVT-7Pro Head
Ampeg SVT-610 Cab
#20
Quote by KG6_Steven
Bad electricity? I'm an electronics technician and have been for over 20 years. Can you explain that one to me?


Bad grounding or not properly grounded. I'm no where near an electronics expert ether, but if it's an older house especially he could have this problem.
#21
Quote by poipoi
yup, that's single coils for you... Humbuckers don't do that, I have read it once why that is, but have forgotten it now...



Your house is full of electrical fields. The fields are caused by the AC wiring that runs everything in your house. Certain items, such as single-coil pups are prone to these fields. As someone else mentioned, they sort of act like an antenna. The stray AC field is picked up and sent along to your amp as a signal. Your amplifier has no idea that it's not a guitar signal and amplifies it. 60 cycle HUM!!!!

Humbuckers are nothing more than two single coils that are wound in opposite directions of each other. This gives them the unique ability to cancel out the stray signal, but pass the guitar signal we want to amplify. As the hum from our stray AC field is induced into one coil, the same signal appears in the other coil, however it's polarity is opposite and the two cancel each other out. No HUM!!!!
#22
Quote by Lancelundy
Bad grounding or not properly grounded. I'm no where near an electronics expert ether, but if it's an older house especially he could have this problem.



Okay. Bad grounding or not grounded at all. Older homes can and do suffer from this problem, but I'm not sure I'd go with the bad electricity statement. The electricity itself is good, it's just that ground, or the green wire, could be missing or damaged.
#24
Hey, you're welcome. FWIW, I'm not an electrician, although I have done some house wiring. I'm actually an electronics technician. You got it pretty close, though.
#25
it's impossible to have your ground perfectly grounded right?

I've been told by someone that they would cover a 6X6 ft area of ground with sulphuric acid and then hammer a 10ft pole into the ground while building any studios to give it a good ground, but it still wasn't perfect. and i know most houses dont have that.