#1
Can anyone tell me what these chords are??

|----|-----|-----|
|--x-|-----|-----|
|----|-----|-----|
|----|--x-|------|
|----|-----|--x--|
|----|-----|-----|
3rd 4th 5th

and

|----|-----|-----|
|----|-----|--x--|
|----|-----|-----|
|----|-----|-----|
|----|--x--|-----|
|----|-----|--x--|
3rd 4th 5th


Thanks!

EDIT:

and this, I know its some kind of E

|----|-----|-----|
|----|-----|-----|
|--x-|-----|-----|
|----|-----|-----|
|----|--x--|-----|
|----|-----|-----|
1st 2nd 3rd
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Last edited by austinb0309 at Jan 18, 2009,
#2
theyre poorly done moved up open chords of C and G which would make them technically poorly done versions of D and A chords
#4
Let's look at the notes in the first one. It's a C shape, played up higher on the neck:

D F# G D

If we only play those 4 strings, it would be DMajadd4.

The notes in the second chord are:

A C# D G

If we only play the those 4 strings, we have an A7add4

How's that?
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That would be called A11.



If it's going to be an A11, then it must also have the 7 and 9, which it doesn't - it only has the 7. Since we're only adding the 11th, it becomes an add chord. Hence, an add4. Check your theory if you don't believe me.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jan 18, 2009,
#8
Quote by KG6_Steven
If it's going to be an A11, then it must also have the 7 and 9, which it doesn't - it only has the 7. Since we're only adding the 11th, it becomes an add chord. Hence, an add4. Check your theory if you don't believe me.
Yeah, so you, um, er, ah, don't need the 9th in an 11 chord. You don't need the fifth, either. Likewise, the 5th, 9th, and 11th are not needed for 13 chords. This applies to maj7/9/11/13 chords as well, and their minor counterparts (and I suppose diminished).

Edit: Don't double-post.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Yeah, so you, um, er, ah, don't need the 9th in an 11 chord. You don't need the fifth, either. Likewise, the 5th, 9th, and 11th are not needed for 13 chords. This applies to maj7/9/11/13 chords as well, and their minor counterparts (and I suppose diminished).

Edit: Don't double-post.


Typically, the 5th gets dropped because we don't have enough fingers to play the root, 3, 5, b7, 9 and 11 all at the same time. It's much easier to play a root, 3, b7, 9 and 11. Even when we do that, it's still called an 11 chord, however if you're leaving out the 9, as in his example, it's still an add4 chord. That's the way I was taught and the dusty books on my shelf back it up. I encourage everyone to verify this for themselves. It's great to ask questions and get answers on UG, but the old saying "trust but verify" is quite alive here.
#10
On a theoretical level KG6 is right - but most instruments (apart from keyboard instruments) can't play a full 13 chord easily so we select the intervals that most give the character of the chord - which also has the benefit of a more 'focused' sound. Generally if the chord contains a 7 it's considered a 9/11/13.

Not arguing btw - just clarifying.

EDIT: I did pop music theory (grade 8) so regular classical based theory may have slightly different rules.
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Last edited by pEdAl2 at Jan 18, 2009,
#11
Quote by pEdAl2
On a theoretical level KG6 is right - but most instruments (apart from keyboard instruments) can't play a full 13 chord easily so we select the intervals that most give the character of the chord - which also has the benefit of a more 'focused' sound. Generally if the chord contains a 7 it's considered a 9/11/13.

Not arguing btw - just clarifying.

EDIT: I did pop music theory (grade 8) so regular classical based theory may have slightly different rules.


Nice post. Here's a good reason to use the proper method of describing chords. If you're playing with a group and you tell another guitar player, for example, to play an A11 chord, how will he play it? He'll play it with the root, 3, b7, 9 and 11. The 9 is going to add a different quality to the chord, a quality which may not be wanted. If I ask the guitar player to use an A7add4, he immediately knows to drop the 9. This is why we use "add", in order to specify something has been dropped and that it's not the full A11, as in this case. Can you call the chord an A11? Sure. We can do almost anything we want, but when you get right down to it, it's not a proper A11 chord and the A11 and A7add4 are two distinct chords. Hope this helps everyone understand the reason for doing it this way.
#12
Quote by KG6_Steven
Nice post. Here's a good reason to use the proper method of describing chords. If you're playing with a group and you tell another guitar player, for example, to play an A11 chord, how will he play it? He'll play it with the root, 3, b7, 9 and 11. The 9 is going to add a different quality to the chord, a quality which may not be wanted. If I ask the guitar player to use an A7add4, he immediately knows to drop the 9. This is why we use "add", in order to specify something has been dropped and that it's not the full A11, as in this case. Can you call the chord an A11? Sure. We can do almost anything we want, but when you get right down to it, it's not a proper A11 chord and the A11 and A7add4 are two distinct chords. Hope this helps everyone understand the reason for doing it this way.


Even if you were right, the proper term would be A7add11, not A7add4. In reality, it is considered perfectly acceptable (and very common) to omit the 9th from an 11 chord (and the 9th and 11th from a 13 chord). The only reason I can think of for the use of the term 7add11 rather than just 11 is if you for some reason absolutely do not want the 9th performed (most likely because the 9th is altered in some way).

Typically, the 5th gets dropped because we don't have enough fingers to play the root


The 5th gets dropped because it's tonally irrelevant (unless altered) and accomplishes nothing but to clutter up the sound of the chord. This is true regardless of what instrument it is being performed on.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jan 18, 2009,