#1
Hey guise,

I play the guitar and harmonica at the same time (I play the chord progression on the guitar and the melody on the harmonica) but it always ends up sounding like a jumbled mess. So I'm wondering how I can make them sound good together.

Is it because of the different keys? I have a C and G key diatonic, so I'm guessing I can only play chord progressions which are in those keys, which brings me to the question, how do I know which chords are in which key?

Also, any other tips on playing the harmonica and the guitar would be appreciated.
#3
yeah cross harping is useful, but mostly for blues and such. If you have a C harp, you can play G blues on it.

Oh I see your question, you should look up major key harmony.
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#4
how do you manage to fret, pick, and move the harmonica at the same time? because I am interested in learning harmonica and playing guitar at the same time.
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#6
...eherm...so I hate to repeat myself but can someone give me an explanation of how to make them sound good together?
#8
Damn, you would lose alot of tone using a holder. Half my tone on the harp comes from how I cup the harp, it would sound so thin If I didn't cup it.

To T/S
Keep the timing on both your instruments. Don't over do it on the harp, don't over do it on the guitar. Try to hit chord tones. Same way you would if you were playing blues guitar over a guitar backing track.
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#9
Quote by demonofthenight
Damn, you would lose alot of tone using a holder. Half my tone on the harp comes from how I cup the harp, it would sound so thin If I didn't cup it.

To T/S
Keep the timing on both your instruments. Don't over do it on the harp, don't over do it on the guitar. Try to hit chord tones. Same way you would if you were playing blues guitar over a guitar backing track.


Timing is not a problem - the music just doesnt go together.

I guess what I really wanna know is, are there any music theory rules which need to be obeyed when playing the two at the same time.
#10
Don't over do it on the harp, don't over do it on the guitar. Try to hit chord tones. Same way you would if you were playing blues guitar over a guitar backing track.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
Damn, you would lose alot of tone using a holder. Half my tone on the harp comes from how I cup the harp, it would sound so thin If I didn't cup it.

To T/S
Keep the timing on both your instruments. Don't over do it on the harp, don't over do it on the guitar. Try to hit chord tones. Same way you would if you were playing blues guitar over a guitar backing track.
This.
Quote by bloodfingers
Timing is not a problem - the music just doesnt go together.

I guess what I really wanna know is, are there any music theory rules which need to be obeyed when playing the two at the same time.
The same as with any group of multiple instruments. Play in the same key. I say that because even if it's obvious your question is worded in a way that doesn't suggest much knowledge. I think we all need more information to know what you're doing wrong.

FYI, you actually can play a (diatonic) harmonica chromatically/in any key...but that's a little more advanced anyway.
#12
Quote by demonofthenight
Damn, you would lose alot of tone using a holder. Half my tone on the harp comes from how I cup the harp, it would sound so thin If I didn't cup it.

To T/S
Keep the timing on both your instruments. Don't over do it on the harp, don't over do it on the guitar. Try to hit chord tones. Same way you would if you were playing blues guitar over a guitar backing track.


THis.

I would only do it out of necessity if you play live for instance. But you should definitely regard them as 2 different instruments.

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#13
The harp has to be the key of the song you are playing, or the relative minor (A "c" harp is also an a-minor harp). As far as making it sound good, it is the same as the reason you play a note on your guitar at a certain time. Hitting the notes of the chord your are playing would be a good start. Another tip is try to hit single notes on the harp, you can get some real pretty tones with some vabrato on an extended note.
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