#1
When trying to figure out a song by ear, is it ok to slow down the song so I can practice hearing better or should I just figure out the flurry of notes that just come out of the instrument at full speed?
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Quote by DiminishedFifth
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#4
slowing down songs usually makes the sound a little lower too, but there are some programs out there that slow down the song, and then you can turn up the pitch back to the original.
#5
Quote by mdwallin
slowing down songs usually makes the sound a little lower too, but there are some programs out there that slow down the song, and then you can turn up the pitch back to the original.


yup yup almost every digital audio software can slow down the song without altering the pitch

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#6
Ok, so my next question is will there ever be a point where I can listen to a solo and transcribe it perfectly at full speed?
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#7
Quote by SilverDark
Ok, so my next question is will there ever be a point where I can listen to a solo and transcribe it perfectly at full speed?



depends on the complexity but after 15 years you tend to get a good ear for intervals. If you do interval ear training that helps a lot. Bear in mind tunes that can remind you of certain intervals eg minor 2nd jaws, perfect 4th here comes the bride 5th star wars (first 2 notes in all these tunes)

when transposing try to work out the scale or mode..musictheory.net can help, rough position on the neck and try to ascertain the typical licks that guitar player (and general common licks) plays. additionally keyboard helps me a lot its all laid out in a much easier format.


edit....i just thought of something...if you use melodyne software it works out the pitches and rhythms for you (depends how many other instruments interfere tho)!
Last edited by DegaMeth at Jan 19, 2009,
#8
Quote by DegaMeth
depends on the complexity but after 15 years you tend to get a good ear for intervals. If you do interval ear training that helps a lot. Bear in mind tunes that can remind you of certain intervals eg minor 2nd jaws, perfect 4th here comes the bride 5th star wars (first 2 notes in all these tunes)

when transposing try to work out the scale or mode..musictheory.net can help, rough position on the neck and try to ascertain the typical licks that guitar player (and general common licks) plays. additionally keyboard helps me a lot its all laid out in a much easier format.


edit....i just thought of something...if you use melodyne software it works out the pitches for you!


IT doesn't take 15 years.

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#9
Quote by xxdarrenxx
IT doesn't take 15 years.



youre right i have been playing for that long though so thats why i stated that figure.