#1
I think I have tried every combination on the neck of a guitar but i cant get good sound.

I really just suck at writing. Any help on how to try new things and to just get better sound i guess?
#3
Can't really advise on the unique sound. Most guitarists spend time trying to find it, Dimebag admitted to taking years to find just the right sound for himself/Pantera.

I got a multi-effects pedal and just muck around with it to get the sounds I want. Though at the moment I'm just using pre-set stuff that was already on it.

As for writing, I don't sit down in the hopes of writing something. I just make noise to the horror of my neighbours. Mucking about on the fretboard is how I find things that I think sound interesting and then I build it up from there. Usually finding that whatever I managed to hit in the muck about sorta sounds like something evil or sad, or heavy, etc. Then I try to find a way from the little bits I make up.

I have been writing my 2nd guitar parts on Power Tab as I go along though, just because I can have what I originally came up with play at the same time. before I was struggling because I was one person trying to do 2 or more parts at once.
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#4
In this order: Learn theory, analyse some songs with theory (find out what makes them good), learn classical melody writing and learn counterpoint.

You can get books on theory, melody writing and counterpoint from your local library. Really helpfull, it put me into the right direction.

I don't think tones that important, I'd rather write a good song with bad tone than a bad song with good tone. Still I think it's just a matter of finding the right amp and then finding the right settings. Head down to a guitar shop and ask to try out some amps and guitars.
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#5
I couldn't disagree more with Demon. Tone is extremely important and that's what sets you apart from a sloppy guitarist. And the tone comes from the tips of your fingers. It's all bout your phrasing.

I would say: try new music genres too. If you haven't ever played blues scales or licks as they call em, then you should try that. Try some reggae strumming patters too. Personally, I don't like country at all, but if you don't mind it, then try that too. Try to play some Chet Atkins songs and play around it, etc.
Hope that helps.

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#6
Quote by Andragon
I couldn't disagree more with Demon. Tone is extremely important and that's what sets you apart from a sloppy guitarist. And the tone comes from the tips of your fingers. It's all bout your phrasing.

I would say: try new music genres too. If you haven't ever played blues scales or licks as they call em, then you should try that. Try some reggae strumming patters too. Personally, I don't like country at all, but if you don't mind it, then try that too. Try to play some Chet Atkins songs and play around it, etc.
Hope that helps.


tone is really not that important when it comes to songwriting. i mean, write a good catchy melody and play it through a crappy amp, it will still sound good. now play a boring powerchord progression through a marshall amp and it will still be boring. its about what you're playing not about what you are playing it through. some of my favorite songs sound like they were recorded on a cheap 4 track recorder in some basement using crappy instruments (they were, really) people don't realize a good song will still be a good song wether it is played on a cheap strat or a $2000 gibson, sure it may sound better on a gibson, but that doesn't take away from the actual writing. I think many new musicians are not giving enough importance to actual composition, which is a shame really

edit: **** i thought this was in MT
Last edited by cubs at Feb 13, 2009,
#8
Ok I think what you are experiencing is a writers block.....Where have you heard that before...hmmmmm,writing papers,well you didn'nt think if you mess around with some random notes you would figure something out...Did you?Well whatever then I can only tell you what I do,similar to reading a book,when your teacher says ok free write and you read a certain type of book say you read fantasy,well you would probably write fantasy,right,see depending on what kind of music you enjoy listening to depends on the songs you write. yea well it's true.One thing that helps is if you don't feel like writing then learn some songs fin a song that you think kicks a**,learn it untill it is perfect,then mess around with a few of the notes in the song like just for fun,then make you own song from that original,I have a lesson in making a song when it gets posted I think you should look at it.
#9
learn the blues scale

Know the roots of the blues scale and then song writing becomes easier also use your influences. If you pick up on chords from songs you have already learned by yourself than find out what the chord is and incorporate it into your songs.

Other than that your best bet is to learn music theory and perhaps expand your listening of music to the blues, jazz, reggae, or funk...a god mix of musical influences allows for a larger range of song writing. Just look at Steve Morse as an example. If you never heard of him than listen to him.
#10
One of the things which helped my write songs was to explore different scales and moods. Finding a scale which had a unique sound to it motivated me further to explore the possibilities of it and actually writing something. You will sound less of a derivative aswell.
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#11
First off, I'll go ahead and say that Tone is just as important to writing your music as any other aspect, so although you shouldn't focus all your time on making the guitar sound just right, you should put some effort into it.

And really, just play around on your guitar, you'll think of stuff. It's been said before, but try playing some styles you're not used to, you could find something you like, maybe tweak it a bit and make a song out of it.

Try new tunings to see what you come up with. Maybe even new instruments ? Pianos and guitars get along pretty well in fact.

Definitely at least start learning music theory, get through the basics at the very least. You don't need to know everything there is to know about Mozart, but a little background information on why certain chords sound good in a row will go a long will in writing.

Most importantly, don't try too hard, just sit back, relax, and play.... The music will come to you
#12
Quote by demonofthenight
In this order: Learn theory, analyse some songs with theory (find out what makes them good), learn classical melody writing and learn counterpoint.


Do that.

Tone wise, I built my own guitar from scrap parts. I have never heard or played anything like it. So, I got lucky and made my own tone from scratch.

If you don't like that, just spend a lot of time working at it your EQ and your effects.
#13
Maybe what they're saying is that tone isn't important to songwriting, but it's important to the song? I dunno. All the advice seems really good, I think. I'd say just mess around in different scales in different keys, maybe even do a few key changes until you feel you're onto something. That's my two cents
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#14
i'm good at writing forst verses and then chorus, but then i get suck on the second verses, any advice??
#15
Here's some basic songwriting tips. Think about the songs you really like. How are they structured? Does it start with the chorus, for example. Also, a key part of songwriting is how the bridge, or middle 8, works into the song. Does the bridge go back into the chorus or the guitar solo? I know not all music and bands use this formula, but figuring out how your favorite songs are structured and figuring out how the parts that really hook you in are structured are key things to think about with songwriting.
#16
it's really hard to find a good unique sounds, espically now, because SOO much has been done in music.
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#17
Quote by demonofthenight
In this order: Learn theory, analyse some songs with theory (find out what makes them good), learn classical melody writing and learn counterpoint.

You can get books on theory, melody writing and counterpoint from your local library. Really helpfull, it put me into the right direction.

I don't think tones that important, I'd rather write a good song with bad tone than a bad song with good tone. Still I think it's just a matter of finding the right amp and then finding the right settings. Head down to a guitar shop and ask to try out some amps and guitars.


5/5 stars for this.

I think with songwriting, it's easy just to muck about and get a good riff and build off of that. After a while though, they are just gonna be sounding the samey, because you are sticking to what you know. Learn the theory. Get the Knowledge to go futher and deeper into song writing. It might take a while, but if youer heart is in it, it will be worth it. TRUST me.
As with the sub-discussion on tone... I wouldn't worry too much about tone, because however hard you try you won't come up with it very quickly. Just try to adjust from time to time and one day it will just happen by mistake. Concentrate on making good songs and the tone will come. Don't waste too much time with tone, you will be wasting good song-writing time.

Hope this helps.
#18
Just a short one and I don't know if it's been said. But when you want to make up a good riff, sometimes just playing 'random' things will make a good riff. Ofc not random in the sense of playing ****, but in the sense that you all of a sudden do things unexpectedly and do something you didnt do before.

My 2 cents.
Last edited by dogmax at Mar 29, 2009,