#1
Hey, my mind ponders on this all the time considering I've never seen any real discussion on it, but If your playing in standered tuning say a B phrygian from the major G scale, and you dropped your guitar to D or even C. Do people really go and learn new scale forums over these tunings? Or do they still call that particular scale a B phrygian? I just don't want to start naming things on the low string different to confuse me when I'm playing in standard.
#2
Do you mean drop D and drop C or tuning down a full step and two full steps?

Also, your comment about "B Phrygian" implies a lack of understanding of modes. Everyone gets confused by them at first, so we have a sticky (finally!!!) at the top of MT.
#3
yes, thats exactly what I ment, I just got so pissed because I thought you delete my post LOL. BTW them stickies are not helping me.
#4
I just call the note whatever it is. If i'm in Eb standard, i'll say "I'm playing an Ab" if I play the 5th fret on the E string. If i'm in E Standard, I'll say "I'm playing an A" if i play the 5th fret on the E string. I suppose it might be easier for some to just always refer to it as standard, but make sure whoever you're talking to knows what you mean.
#5
Quote by rebel624
yes, thats exactly what I ment, I just got so pissed because I thought you delete my post LOL.
I didn't ask a yes or no question. Which do you mean?
#6
you asked me if I meant drop c or drop d. So basically the correct way is to go through your scale if you tuned to drop C and find what kinda alterations you need to make, to correct the scale as if it were tuned in E standard. Ok, how time consuming. I'm soo lazy when it comes to! Should key signatures play a big role when it comes to modes? Because I feel like I'm understanding these modes rather well compared to other theory. I'm comfortable with the pattern they evolve over the entire fret board and they really help me to stay in key. I usually get outa key when I attempt to play on the first 1-5 frets and jump up the neck to around the 12th fret or higher.
Last edited by rebel624 at Jan 18, 2009,
#7
If you tune your low E string down a full step compared to the other strings (Drop D, Drop C), you will have to move the notes on the E string up two frets for your standard scale patterns to work (though I suppose they aren't the standard patterns if you alter them).

Please read the various theory lessons (My Sig!) around here.
#8
won't your pattern of whole steps and half steps throughout the scale change also? I'm not to sure.
#9
Quote by rebel624
won't your pattern of whole steps and half steps throughout the scale change also? I'm not to sure.

No, the scale has it's pattern of whole steps and half steps set already. Regardless of how your guitar is tuned, a major scale is still WWHWWWH, all that changes is the position of the notes on the fret board.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No. Explain to me why you said that so I can address the areas where you lack an understanding of the fundamentals of music and guitar.

What are you referring to that I said? I was wondering what's a good step in theory to study that will really improve that people learn in conjuction of modes? Something that will really share a relation to them.

Quote by jakdoncrack
No, the scale has it's pattern of whole steps and half steps set already. Regardless of how your guitar is tuned, a major scale is still WWHWWWH, all that changes is the position of the notes on the fret board.


your right thats the wording I was looking for, I don't know why I used whole steps and halfs steps.
Last edited by rebel624 at Jan 18, 2009,
#12
Quote by rebel624
won't your pattern of whole steps and half steps throughout the scale change also?
Please explain to me why you said that so I can address the areas where you lack an understanding of the fundamentals of music and guitar.
#13
I didn't mean to say it like that. I realize now that I was making a mistake. Although If you didn't read my last post. I was wondering about something I could learn side to these modes. Basically like the theory that follows up after modes. I'm hoping to tie some of this stuff I've learned together to get a better understanding of the whole factor to composing music.