#1
Composition wise, if I were played a clean "sad" melody in Am, and then I wanted to go into a dark metal sound, I'd distort it and play a Em. Once in Em, I'd like to start playing some power chords, so I would want to result in playing the powerchords in the Em scale, right?
#2
I would stick with Em, but you can honestly do whatever the hell you want.
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#3
You can do that if you want. I don't get why you have to change key, though.

However, I think the question you're really asking is if you should resolve to the I or i chord. The answer is that it is very common, but not required and not always done. If you change key, it's as if that old key never existed. When you change into Em, you are in Em and should not concern yourself with the fact that the beginning of the song was in Am, though it may be nice to end with that same sad Am riff at the end.
#4
can you not just stay in the key of Am? so whatever riff you base off of Em will be phrygian and you will sound so funk-ay and mode-ay and kewl!

oh and it will be more uhhh "dark" and stuff like you want as opposed to switching keys into Em.

but really you can do whatever you want... just sayin'.
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Last edited by guitardude11 at Jan 19, 2009,
#5
why would whatever riff based off Em be phrygian? phrygian is a scale based on the 3rd scale degree "root note" in any given scale.
#6
Quote by rebel624
why would whatever riff based off Em be phrygian? phrygian is a scale based on the 3rd scale degree "root note" in any given scale.

well you just answered the question for yourself buddy.

Am=C
3rd scale degree of C = E
E phrygian

unlesssss... u misunderstood me, i meant the chord Em, not the key E minor, its still in the key of Am, or C, or........ E phrygian. no?
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#7
going into Em is nice it's in the same key of Am so it's a nice transition. With the correct conviction it would definitely work.

I break out of keys in almost all my songs. Not because of the lulz, because you can have so much variation.

And it's a good challenge also.

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#8
Quote by xxdarrenxx
going into Em is nice it's in the same key of Am so it's a nice transition. With the correct conviction it would definitely work.

I break out of keys in almost all my songs. Not because of the lulz, because you can have so much variation.

And it's a good challenge also.


well this answers my question I posted in another thread. Bangoodcharlotte asked why I would want to go out of the key Am and into Em. Well basically I thought the concept of theory was to give you reason to why you are aloud to do this, and I figured since Em was in the key of Am it would be an option to play in the key of Em as long as you started with Em as the root. Then if I where to go back into Am for instance I couldn't just select a chord in the key of Am correct? This would lead me to be playing in another key. I'm actually kinda confused. Can someone refresh me on the formula for the major and minor scale please?
#9
Quote by rebel624
well this answers my question I posted in another thread. Bangoodcharlotte asked why I would want to go out of the key Am and into Em. Well basically I thought the concept of theory was to give you reason to why you are aloud to do this, and I figured since Em was in the key of Am it would be an option to play in the key of Em as long as you started with Em as the root. Then if I where to go back into Am for instance I couldn't just select a chord in the key of Am correct? This would lead me to be playing in another key. I'm actually kinda confused. Can someone refresh me on the formula for the major and minor scale please?


Like I said if you play it with conviction it will work, and give an interesting twist to ur songs.

Just like in jazz, why are you allowed to hit chromatics? Because you hit the chord tones on the beats (even this is not always true, but that's even more "Advanced" "rulebreaking")

But you get what I'm saying?


Major scale = in C

C, D, E, F, G, A, B
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Minor scale = in C

C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb
1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7

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#10
since Em is a chord that is in the key of Am, you could make your progression be in either key... it all depends on how you arrange it, and what you resolve to. if you stick with Am, your chords are:

Am Bdim C Dm Em F G

and since Em is the fifth, that's gonna make it fit really well. try resolving your chord progression back to the Am, or end on the Em.

if you decide to actually change keys, then just forget the Am part once you've played it, start playing Em, and use any of these chords:

Em F#dim G Am Bm C D

notice that the Am is within this key too, but it's in the fourth position, not the fifth. it's still going to be an important part of most Em chord progressions, but not always as the one to resolve to.

Am and Em have a lot in common, and many many songs blur the line between the two keys, particularly in rock and blues.
#12
As i found out the other week on here, power chords are neither major nor minor. So i guess you could just do what you want and finish the chord riff on the open E power chord and it would sound right. Power chords to my ears sound good whatever way i play them.

But yeah, read up on Cadences.
#13
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
whats with the whole Em thing and metal, I don't get it..

why is it so special?


Well i think it's usually E Phrygian that's used in metal, which is a minor mode anyway.

I don't get it either. But then i don't get why a lot of bands HAVE to tune down. Opeth rarely tune down and they're heavy as shít.
#14
Quote by Ikonoklast
Well i think it's usually E Phrygian that's used in metal, which is a minor mode anyway.

I don't get it either. But then i don't get why a lot of bands HAVE to tune down. Opeth rarely tune down and they're heavy as shít.


I like to tune down a half-step because playing is easier. The tension in the strings drops greatly, bends go up and down faster and easier.
#15
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
I like to tune down a half-step because playing is easier. The tension in the strings drops greatly, bends go up and down faster and easier.


Oh yeah i know it's a good way of relieving tension in the strings. But a lot of people downtune for the 'heavy' effect. I was watching a video of the 8-string Ibanez the other day and people were going 'shít that's so fúcking heavy omg omg omg'.

I for one think there's a difference between 'heavy' and 'deep'.
The Ibanez 8-stringer is low end distortion on another level, but it doesn't automatically make you sound more brutal.
#16
Quote by Ikonoklast
Oh yeah i know it's a good way of relieving tension in the strings. But a lot of people downtune for the 'heavy' effect. I was watching a video of the 8-string Ibanez the other day and people were going 'shít that's so fúcking heavy omg omg omg'.

I for one think there's a difference between 'heavy' and 'deep'.
The Ibanez 8-stringer is low end distortion on another level, but it doesn't automatically make you sound more brutal.


If you tune an 8 string Ibanez to drop A or something it becomes "heavy" I guess.
Playing a powerchord riff on the high E and B strings just isn't as heavy as one played on the Low-B and Gs strings on a 8 string.

Downtuning your guitar a halfstep is stupid if you want to get heavier.
You gain one note, one stupid note, that note isn't gonna make you sound metal.
#17
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
If you tune an 8 string Ibanez to drop A or something it becomes "heavy" I guess.
Playing a powerchord riff on the high E and B strings just isn't as heavy as one played on the Low-B and Gs strings on a 8 string.

Downtuning your guitar a halfstep is stupid if you want to get heavier.
You gain one note, one stupid note, that note isn't gonna make you sound metal.


Yeah but if you compare it to the song Masters Apprentice by Opeth. The opening riff is an F-E power chord change in standard tuning, and with the vocals it sounds brutal as shít!

Bass is lower than guitar and i don't think that makes bass sound heavier. (By heavier i mean in the 'br00tal' sense.)

I think it's the riffs/overall song that makes something heavy, not just the depth of the bass!
Last edited by Ikonoklast at Jan 19, 2009,
#18
Quote by rebel624
Composition wise, if I were played a clean "sad" melody in Am, and then I wanted to go into a dark metal sound, I'd distort it and play a Em. Once in Em, I'd like to start playing some power chords, so I would want to result in playing the powerchords in the Em scale, right?

Simplest answer you're going to get: which way sounds better? I'd recommend you stay in Am, simply because it would make the quick switch to the Em more dramatic. Alternately, you could stay in Em to make the entire chorus stand out more.

And while power chords are neither major nor minor, you have to have a specific key in mind for when you add other instruments later on.
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