#1
I've never really played in an orchestra before so I'm looking for any advice. Our first rehearsal today was rough on me. Nobody played well, it was all sight reading, but I still felt like crap. Does anybody have any advice for playing in a pit orchestra? Other than practice practice practice.

Thanks,

Zach.
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#2
It always sounds like crap the first time no matter what. What instrument do you play? I play 1st or 2nd trumpet.
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#3
I got asked by my school director to play guitar. We already had a piano player which is what I'm trained as a musician in.

I mean I learned guitar first and I play better on guitar. But piano is the one I took lessons with and such.
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#4
Watch the director like a freaking hawk. You'll have to adapt to the singer MANY times.
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Suggest you play november rain.

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#6
Quote by Artemis Entreri
I got asked by my school director to play guitar. We already had a piano player which is what I'm trained as a musician in.

I mean I learned guitar first and I play better on guitar. But piano is the one I took lessons with and such.


Guitar in an orchestra? :S

Normally there aren't any guitars unless its a guitar concerto, which is almost always for classical guitar, and then the guitarist is a soloist, and isn't an actual member of the orchestra...

My advice is to watch the conductor and count, and pay attention to the cues on your score, to know when to come back after long rests.
#7
Quote by isaac_bandits
Guitar in an orchestra? :S

Normally there aren't any guitars unless its a guitar concerto, which is almost always for classical guitar, and then the guitarist is a soloist, and isn't an actual member of the orchestra...

My advice is to watch the conductor and count, and pay attention to the cues on your score, to know when to come back after long rests.


It's for our school musical. There's an electric guitar part.
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#8
Quote by Artemis Entreri
It's for our school musical. There's an electric guitar part.


Sounds cool. I wish my orchestra had a song with an electric guitar. Instead I have to play double bass.
#9
Guitar is par for a pit, depending on the musical (which is it, by the way?) you may have lots or little. Some comments I guess, on the experience:

Reading is going to be a wreck, you're a school orchestra, don't take it too hard. The upside is your reading skill is going to get a great boost if you work through it because playing pit means playing a lot of rhythms which make little or no sense without the singer there in pretty much every single key. So get practicing; there's a lot of material and you need to know it all.

More important than ever in a pit is eyes always on the conductor. You should hopefully be used to that already, but the pit is slave to the physical reality on stage: The conductor has to lead the pit by what he sees happening, and there are sections that are repeated until the actors are ready, cues that need to match on action on stage, and fuck-up bits where it seems everything's about to fall into an uh-oh-awkward silence and you basically have to guess the right response from what you've rehearsed and what the conductor is showing you. And the singers slow and speed and get nervous and sing in stupid keys and you just have to adapt, live with it and make them sound good because their on stage and you're supposed to be invisible. Also I recommend pissing before the performance, keeping a good size bottle of water handy, and bringing a cushion for your seat.

Be ready for everything: One night one of the clarinets was sick, showed up anyway, threw up during a tune, and the pit is pretty crowded, and vomit's pretty smelly, and no one in the audience noticed.

After the musical is over you might need some therapy (and by therapy I mean alcohol, and don't let the cast stiff you out of the cast party, you're part of the team too) to help you forget those damn songs which are going to be stuck in your head for years.