#1
Okay, I took my guitar to this guy that I heard about who makes guitars out of his garage. So, he repaired it and when I got it back the next day everything was fine, but I noticed he had lowered my strat's bridge ALL the way down. So, now it was laying flat down on the body of my guitar.

Was he supposed to do that? Will that affect my guitar in any way?
#3
If it really doesn't feel right, then just loosen the screws on the bridgeplate a little bit until you get a bit of rise on the back end of the bridge
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#4
it lowers the action of the guitar, and tip to everyone, dont take your guitar to some guy that does it out of his GARAGE
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#5
that's how strat bridges are designed to be. some people reduce spring tension or use higher gauge strings and make it so you can pull up a little. he probably put the right gauge strings on it
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#6
If it was supposed to be a flush mount bridge he did it right. If it was supposed to be a floating bridge, he did it wrong. Do you know which is which? I can't tell you without seeing it, or a better description.
#7
i guess u previously had the bridge in a floating position so you could raise or lower the pitch? what he did wont let you raise your pitch, but it will stay in tune much better and it will be more stable.
#8
Quote by Ghost_bass
that's how strat bridges are designed to be. some people reduce spring tension or use higher gauge strings and make it so you can pull up a little. he probably put the right gauge strings on it

Um, no. Actually they are designed to be 1/8" gap, acccording to fender, not lowered all the way to the body. Thats according to the manual. ITs ok to lower it to the body though as long as the claw screws arent overtightened.
#9
for greater tuning stability, usually used with stock MIM strats and lower, you'll find a lot of owners leave the bridge tight. flush against the body.


with my MIA i leave it floating. but this takes a little more care and usually a nicer set of tuners.


so, how did you want it?
Jenneh

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#10
Some people like 'em floating other like 'em flat. Just because he makes guitars out of his garage does not indicate that his work is bad.
#11
^stujomo is right^
The best guitar tech in our area does it out his garage.
I hate people who don't trust garage techs
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Originally posted by Gunpowder:
Everyone just jumps on the bandwagon and gives the same advice in these situations. You know what? I'm going to be different. Call the firemen.