#1
Hello, I am a guitarist and I love classic rock and I don`t have any musicians around me. I can`t find it in me to write a song/riff, I mean I can get a few chords down, but I also want to write a few riffs and solos. I play by ear, I know very little music theory, only know the chromatic scale and A minor pentatonic scale. Where do I start?
#2
what i did was try to pick up on what youre favorite guitarists have done, and try to incorporate that into a chord progression. start by almost ripping them off if you have to, but then add your own feel/style to it. it worked for me, hope that helps
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#3
Learn theory, analyse some songs, learn classical melody writing (borrow a "melody writing" book from the library), learn counterpoint. In that order.
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#4
the way i write riffs is by learning to play song i like. my advice is learn songs that you like and then take away and add to it until you make it yours(move it up and down the frets, add a harmonic or muted notes). thats what i do

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#5
First thing's first, theory is VERY important for a song writer. I'm not saying that you can't write anything knowing those 2 scales or that you have to go out there and learn every single scale. But it's important you understand how songs are structured, or how you form chords, relative minors and majors, keys etc. After learning theory, then it's up to you to write the song. People have several different ways to write songs. Some people go to a scale they like (I believe Classic Rock songs tend to be written in normal Majors or the Ionian mode) and noodle around for a bit, maybe find something they like. Some people get a riff in their head, figure it out on guitar, elaborate etc. Find the way that works for you. And importantly, don't judge yourself on whatever you come up with. If you don't come up with anything the first time, doesn't matter, try again, I needed maybe 3 sessions of playing around before finding a good riff.
#6
Quote by White-Trash Wil
the way i write riffs is by learning to play song i like. my advice is learn songs that you like and then take away and add to it until you make it yours(move it up and down the frets, add a harmonic or muted notes). thats what i do
Then that's not really writing music is it
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#7
Quote by demonofthenight
Then that's not really writing music is it


True words. It will also sound like the song that you took it from. Your composition can be influenced by a song that you like, but it shouldn't be built upon it.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Then that's not really writing music is it


Good musicians borrow, great musicians steal.

The foundation of blues is pretty much using other peoples licks and making them yours, nothing wrong with that.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#9
Quote by Nitro89
Hello, I am a guitarist and I love classic rock and I don`t have any musicians around me. I can`t find it in me to write a song/riff, I mean I can get a few chords down, but I also want to write a few riffs and solos. I play by ear, I know very little music theory, only know the chromatic scale and A minor pentatonic scale. Where do I start?


Going with what you know already, try some pentatonic licks in between powerchords. Something like:


e|-----------------------------------
B|-----------------------------------
G|-2---------------2-------7-----5---
D|-2-----------2---2-------7-----5---
A|-0---0-3-0---0---0---0-0-5---0-3---
E|-----------3-----------------------


You wouldn't believe how much classic rock is written like this. Keep it nice and simple to begin with.
#11
I ussualy just fiddle and go crazy and change up the rhthym and eventually ull get an interesting riff then u just go from there. oh and air guitar helps too just imagine a riff find it out on the geetar and bam there u go
#12
Establish a base by taking the chords you know and writing some rythyms. For a beginning song, a ternary structure would be easy: just write a few chords to repeat for one section, another set of chords different from the first, and then the first section again with optional changes. The section could be made up of as many chords as you want. Once you've set up the chords, apply what knowledge you know to build on top of it, or just experiment and write it what feels good. You can beef up the rythym, apply different layers by adding bass notes or expressions; and you can come up with a lead section, and write a solo for it.

Borrowing techniques from other artists can certainly help, but directly ripping their tunes and altering it does not make an original song. I always find myself sounding similar to Steve Hackett, J. Mascis or Noel Gallagher at times, but that's only because I listen to their music so often that I find their techniques appealing. I would never intentionally use their notes unless I was playing my own cover of the song.
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#13
^^ you always rip off.

Being good means you can rip it off without anyone noticing.

Even if you don't rip off; If you coincidently wrote something that someone else has written (which statistically is very likely considering the amount of music on this planet.)

Then you still get hated (Coldplay Vs Satch).

What you should consider is playing what YOU really want to hear/like. Then even if you sound like someone else, you will always be true to urself.

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#14
Learn how to write chord progressions. I usually mess around with some chords, establish the key, then add to it based on that.
#15
Your question would require a HUGE answer. Everything on this site is based around making music, but I'll try to condense it for ya.

First cut your teeth. If your on a guitar based website I'll assume you've already done this, but incase you havn't I'm gonna say it. Learn some songs. Before you do anything else, learn songs that you like, full songs, every part, I even learn the vocal melodies. This will develop your ear.

Second, learn some basic theory. You don't have to be a master of counterpoint to write songs, you don't actually need any theory, but it'll definatly help. Learn the major scale, minor scale, and how to make chords, then which chords exist in the major and minor scales.

Third, write some songs. Don't be offended, but your first few songs will probably suck, everyones do. Just keep writing songs, full songs. Songwriting is something that needs to be practised just like everything else, so go write some songs.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.