#1
Ok so i know the major scale pattern and all the patterns but what i don't understand is how to really apply it across the fretboard.

so say heres the Gmajor scale:

l---l---l---l---l-0-l---l-0-l-0-l---l---l---l---l---l---l
l---l---l---l---l-0-l---l-0-l-0-l---l---l---l---l---l---l
l---l---l---l-0-l-0-l---l-0-l---l---l---l---l---l---l---l
l---l---l---l-0-l-0-l---l-0-l---l---l---l---l---l---l---l
l---l---l-0-l---l-0-l---l-0-l---l---l---l---l---l---l---l
l---l---l-0-l---l-0-l---l-0-l---l---l---l---l---l---l---l
Last edited by scguitarking927 at Jan 20, 2009,
#6
Quote by scguitarking927
thanks, i guess i just needed to see it put out acorss the the board to get it

Not really - that pattern ultimately isn't telling you anything.

What you need to do is understand what the pattern is actually comprised of. A pattern is not a scale, it's just telling you where to find it...not how to use it, when to use it, why you can use it or what it actually is.

You really need to look at the notes and intervals a scale contains, that's the important information. For example, the G major scale has the notes G A B C D E F#...that IS the G major scale. The patterns are simply showing you all the places those notes occur, the same pattern will also apply for other scales too which is why there's not a lot to be gained from patterns alone.

Patterns are great for helping you use a scale and navigate around the fretboard, however they don't really teach you anything...have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section.
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#7
Quote by steven seagull
Not really - that pattern ultimately isn't telling you anything.

What you need to do is understand what the pattern is actually comprised of. A pattern is not a scale, it's just telling you where to find it...not how to use it, when to use it, why you can use it or what it actually is.

You really need to look at the notes and intervals a scale contains, that's the important information. For example, the G major scale has the notes G A B C D E F#...that IS the G major scale. The patterns are simply showing you all the places those notes occur, the same pattern will also apply for other scales too which is why there's not a lot to be gained from patterns alone.

Patterns are great for helping you use a scale and navigate around the fretboard, however they don't really teach you anything...have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section.


no i havn't seen the articles

So i understand that the notes like the major scale you take your base note we'll say D just to change it so it won't be the same, and you go whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half steps to find the notes, so in this case would be D,E,F#,G,A,B,C#,D

I guess im having trouble seeing it is why i was looking for the full pattern

but what is the pattern to finding the notes for the modes.
Last edited by scguitarking927 at Jan 20, 2009,
#8
but what is the pattern to finding the notes for the modes.


Modes aren't something you need to worry about until you have a firm grasp on the theory behind the major scale. Just know that they are not box shapes, and that they are not merely the major scale starting on a different note.
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#9
the patterns are there to help you locate it more easily, otherwise knowing patterns is pointless but they're good for navigation