#1
Hey guys I'm a noob to the guitar and to UG.com. Just a quick question, what key is the chord progression Am, C, E, Dm in? I found a backing track with this and it sounds intriguing and I'd like to solo over this. Any help, and brief explanation or reference is appreciated. Thanks
#3
I dont think it would be A minor since the E wouldnt fit the E would have to be E minor.
Last edited by ehlert99 at Jan 20, 2009,
#4
Quote by ehlert99
I dont think it would be A minor since the E wouldnt fit the E would have to be E minor.


E major is more common then E minor. The seventh scale degree is usually raised in a minor key causing the V chord to become major. The G in the E minor chord becomes G# creating E major.
#5
Quote by blueriver
E major is more common then E minor. The seventh scale degree is usually raised in a minor key causing the V chord to become major. The G in the E minor chord becomes G# creating E major.


Doesn't the key of A minor having a lowered 7th change it to G?
#6
I'm not sure what you mean. If you lowered the seventh scale degree in A minor you would have a diminished seventh (Gb). Or are you asking about lowering it back to G from G#?
#9
Quote by blueriver
The seventh scale degree is usually raised in a minor key causing the V chord to become major.


That's what I was talking about. The seventh is lowered, not raised. It should be Eminor, not major.
#10
It's quite common to raise the 7th over chord V. Use the A harmonic minor over the E chord, and the A Aeolian over the others.
#11
Quote by Ninjamonkey767
That's what I was talking about. The seventh is lowered, not raised. It should be Eminor, not major.


I think I see what you meant. A minor scale consists of the Tonic (A) major second(B) minor third(C) perfect fourth (D) Perfect fifth(E) Minor Sixth(F) and minor seventh(G).

However it is common for the seventh scale degree to be raised to a major seventh, because the pull to the tonic is stronger. Play an E minor chord, and then play an A minor chord. Then play an E major chord , and then play an A minor chord. You can hear the difference, as the G# pulls towards the A.
#13
There's three different A minor scales:

Natural: A B C D E F G A

Harmonic: A B C D E F G# A

Melodic: A B C D E F# G# A

In order for a chord progression to have Am C E and Dm, we'd have to be dealing with the harmonic minor. The natural has no G# to make the E Maj chord, and the melodic has an F# which interferes with the Dm chord.
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Quote by titsmcgee852
Hahaha. Probably the best post i've seen from an 08'er.


He was talking about me.
#14
Well, it's quite common to "borrow" the V from the harmonic minor though (for it's harmonic effects, hence the name IIRC?), even though the song mainly uses aeolian minor.


EDIT: quite the extremely common
#15
Quote by Isidora
There's three different A minor scales:

Natural: A B C D E F G A

Harmonic: A B C D E F G# A

Melodic: A B C D E F# G# A

In order for a chord progression to have Am C E and Dm, we'd have to be dealing with the harmonic minor. The natural has no G# to make the E Maj chord, and the melodic has an F# which interferes with the Dm chord.


This is misleading. Harmonic and melodic minor are not separate scales, they are conventions within minor tonality. Regardless of the status of the seventh, the song is simply in "minor".
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#16
if you're playing E major and not E minor then it's the key of A minor harmonic.
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#17
Quote by Ace88
if you're playing E major and not E minor then it's the key of A minor harmonic.


Harmonic minor is not a key. The song is in A minor.

In Western tonal music, dominant chords are major. Period. The use of a v chord is perfectly acceptable, but it utterly fails in establishing the i chord as the tonic. Regardless of whether you're playing in a major or minor key, the dominant chord is major unless the composer for some reason wants an effect that only the v chord can give.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jan 20, 2009,
#18
^^ sorry, the SCALE used in the song is A minor harmonic.
Quote by yellowfrizbee
What does a girl have to do to get it in the butt thats all I ever wanted from you. Why, Ace? Why? I clean my asshole every night hoping and wishing and it never happens.
Bitches be Crazy.

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#19
Quote by Ace88
^^ sorry, the SCALE used in the song is A minor harmonic.


Even that is misleading. Harmonic minor describes a convention within minor tonality in which the chord built off of the dominant is made major...and that's pretty much it. It isn't really a scale in its own right. How the seventh is treated outside of the confines of the dominant chord (say, in the melody, or in chords built off of other scale degrees) will depend entirely on the context. The song is simply in minor, and uses the minor scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.