#1
I recently got a tube amp (like two days ago literally, Fender Hot Rod DeVille 410) and I noticed that it picks up a lot of noise and even with my noise gate on I'll hear some fuzzing now and then. I don't know if it's playing technique or maybe one of my guitar cables, but I know that one of the cables I have does make a lot of fuzzing noise but I don't think it's all that cable, since I'm playing with a bit of gain.

When I pick I tend to rest my hand on the lowE/A strings for playing highE, B and G strings. When I'm picking lowE/A/D strings my hand moves from the strings to right above them, resting on the body. Could this create any noise?
Quote by MooshMooshMarc
I didnt have anything planned out, and I didn't know **** about improvising, so it was like "OH SHI- SOLO TIME" so I kerry-kinged it.
#2
One of the popular misconceptions is that a noise gate reduces noise while you're playing. They don't. Noise gates are only effective when you're not playing. This is the function of the Threshold knob, which turns on the gate when you're not playing (to limit hum and other noise) and then turns off the gate when you start to play again. Any noise, whether it's hum or improper technique, will still come through when you're playing.

So, try turning off the noise gate, don't play anything and see if you hear the noise. If it's there, then turn the gate on and the noise should go away. If the threshold is correctly set, as soon as you hit a string, the noise and the played string will be amplified.

If you have poor cables, they can let in a lot of RFI, or Radio Frequency Interference - this can be humming from you house wiring or anything else strong enough to get past the poor shielding in the cables. One way to get rid of hum, is to use a Direct Box between your guitar and the amp. It's a 1:1 transformer that effectively removes 60 Hz hum. However, if your cables are too long, they can also let in RFI from a local radio station. I like to use my box with some of my guitars, but I get a local AM station that plays through my amp. It kills the hum on my single coils, as long as you don't mind listening to the local talk radio.
#3
Also worth bearing in mind is you said you're playing with a bit of gain - if your guitar itself hasn't been properly shielded or grounded then you're also going to be picking up more hum than you should.
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#4
Quote by KG6_Steven
One of the popular misconceptions is that a noise gate reduces noise while you're playing. They don't. Noise gates are only effective when you're not playing. This is the function of the Threshold knob, which turns on the gate when you're not playing (to limit hum and other noise) and then turns off the gate when you start to play again. Any noise, whether it's hum or improper technique, will still come through when you're playing.


Humming/Buzzing should actually go away.
#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
So, try turning off the noise gate, don't play anything and see if you hear the noise. If it's there, then turn the gate on and the noise should go away. If the threshold is correctly set, as soon as you hit a string, the noise and the played string will be amplified.

Um, no? The noise gate I'm use (ISP Decimator G-String) Is made to kill hum/etc. when playing and when not playing. It cuts out noise from a decibel level you set and everything below it. And, since the hum/etc. is going to be at a lower decibel level then where you're playing, only your playing should come out. It's also why, if not perfectly set for your instrument, it will fade sustained notes fast if you set the decibel level too high.

I'm thinking its probably the cable is old and whenever I play through that single cable there tends to be a lot of static coming out every now and then, but I also would like to know if my playing technique possibly affects this as well.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc
I didnt have anything planned out, and I didn't know **** about improvising, so it was like "OH SHI- SOLO TIME" so I kerry-kinged it.
#6
Quote by TSelman
Humming/Buzzing should actually go away.



Well, one would tend to think that, but it'd be wrong. I took the liberty of grabbing something from Wikipedia:

A Noise Gate or gate is an electronic device or software logic that is used to control the volume of an audio signal. In its most simple form, a noise gate allows a signal to pass through only when it is above a set threshold: the gate is 'open'. If the signal falls below the threshold no signal is allowed to pass (or the signal is substantially attenuated): the gate is 'closed'. [1]A noise gate is used when the level of the 'signal' is above the level of the 'noise'. The threshold is set above the level of the 'noise' and so when there is no 'signal' the gate is closed. A noise gate does not remove noise from the signal. When the gate is open both the signal and the noise will pass through.

End quote

Please pay particular attention to that last sentence. When the gate is open, the noise and the signal are allowed to pass. If you want to remove hum from the signal, you're talking about a device other than a noise gate.
#7
Quote by KG6_Steven
Well, one would tend to think that, but it'd be wrong. I took the liberty of grabbing something from Wikipedia:

A Noise Gate or gate is an electronic device or software logic that is used to control the volume of an audio signal. In its most simple form, a noise gate allows a signal to pass through only when it is above a set threshold: the gate is 'open'. If the signal falls below the threshold no signal is allowed to pass (or the signal is substantially attenuated): the gate is 'closed'. [1]A noise gate is used when the level of the 'signal' is above the level of the 'noise'. The threshold is set above the level of the 'noise' and so when there is no 'signal' the gate is closed. A noise gate does not remove noise from the signal. When the gate is open both the signal and the noise will pass through.

End quote

Please pay particular attention to that last sentence. When the gate is open, the noise and the signal are allowed to pass. If you want to remove hum from the signal, you're talking about a device other than a noise gate.


The pedal is called a "noise reduction pedal." I guess they're different things.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc
I didnt have anything planned out, and I didn't know **** about improvising, so it was like "OH SHI- SOLO TIME" so I kerry-kinged it.
#8
Different pedals will work slightly differently. Some will cut out constant static hum, so when you're actually playing (so there isn't one constant drone), they won't work. Other pedals entirely cut out frequencies within a certain range and this will be effective when you are playing, in much the same was an EQ pedal can be used.

Either way, quoting Wikipedia as any kind of proof of anything is ****ing hilarious.
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#9
Quote by MrFlibble
Either way, quoting Wikipedia as any kind of proof of anything is ****ing hilarious.

It can be credible as long as there's an actual source; but you might as well show the source.

Anyways, if anyone can comment on the real topic, it'd be nice.
Quote by MooshMooshMarc
I didnt have anything planned out, and I didn't know **** about improvising, so it was like "OH SHI- SOLO TIME" so I kerry-kinged it.
#10
Does your guitar have single coils, that might be the problem. If your guiatr is not sheilded that might be the problem, or it just might be like a ground loop or somthing like that with the amp or the wiring. Perhaps you have a cheap pedal in your effects loop or before the amp that creates alot of noise... lets get some more info on your setup.
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#11
My setup:

Guitar: Ibanez RG370DXGP3 w/ original pickups

Amp: Fender DeVille Hot Rod 4x10

Pedals:
Boss FZ-5
Boss OS-2
Dunlop Wah
ISP Decimator G-String

Wired in that order. The G-string has it's own input and output.

How would I know if the guitar is or isn't shielded?
Quote by MooshMooshMarc
I didnt have anything planned out, and I didn't know **** about improvising, so it was like "OH SHI- SOLO TIME" so I kerry-kinged it.