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#1
How did guitarists like steve vai, the angra guitarist, etc etc shawn lane, pete townsend get away with practicing that much a day? Its one thing to be able to do that alone but its another if they actually have PARENTS. Parents always ask for random stuff to be done, or to go to random places like parties any stuff, does anyone know how they avoid this stuff? Does anyone acutally do that over here? I wanna hear from you!!!

<3]

U MAY IGNORE MY PS

p.s. Hai im new! im also learning guitar theory atm, abit off topic but any tips? i know all major and minor chords and shapesn i m starting into 7ths soon, 9ths not very soin mayeb nex week, i know my pentatonics major and minor well,m and my cycle of fifths. just started into modes, any tipsss?
#2
they probably didn't....maybe they practiced a couple of days like that in their time.
**** that **** i'm not practicing for that long lol

Paul Gilbert practiced for 100 hours a day
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#3
They perfected time travel and went back in time just before bed.

Or...they practised without the guitar plugged in so it wouldn't make a noise
#4
i think they just have the talent (sry chris) ^^
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#8
you say "random" too much.
and yeha anything can be done only if you want to.
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#9
In interviews i've read with Vai, he said that not all of it was practice on guitar; some of it was time spent learning theory etc. They'd also have to build up to practicing that much in a day; i've been playing for quite a few years, and I'm still pretty sure if i tried playing for twelve hours straight my arms would want to crawl off my shoulder and hide somewhere.

Still, i think "no social life" is the main reason :P
#10
They didn't, they were bragging. Just like Van Halen bragging about not knowing theory and most bebop guys bragging about heroin.
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#12
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
If you practice guitar for more than like 2 hours your brain gets so clogged up anyhow, it isn't worth it.



This. It's like revising for exams. You're supposed to give your brain a break every now and again. Thinking with an exhausted brain is as bad as not using it at all, which i think could probably go for guitar too.
#13
Practice? Townshend? Hahahahahahaha

Brian Jones used to spend 5 hours on the bus tuning his teardrop guitar between tour gigs.
#14
Try practicing in 5-10 minute bursts over an 8 hr period. That is very achievable. I know I was doing it at GIT.
#15
I think it's pretty simple. If you like to practice, you'll make the time for it.
Practicing doesn't HAVE to be boring. Practicing ANYTHING. Some people just don't
get the whole concept of practicing and they've CHOSEN to be bored. So, to them,
practicing for long lengths of time will seem unimaginable, but the reality for those
that enjoy it is that it's easy and the whole day is gone before you know it.
#17
Quote by edg
I think it's pretty simple. If you like to practice, you'll make the time for it.
Practicing doesn't HAVE to be boring. Practicing ANYTHING. Some people just don't
get the whole concept of practicing and they've CHOSEN to be bored. So, to them,
practicing for long lengths of time will seem unimaginable, but the reality for those
that enjoy it is that it's easy and the whole day is gone before you know it.


This.

Although 15 hours is exaggerated.

They probably just said it in an interview more to show that they played guitar a lot, and some guy probably took it over as literally.

Like when you say;

"I've been to school all day" doesn't mean you literally went to school ALL day, but probably for like 8 hours or so.

By saying I used to play up to 10 hours a day, could very well mean they played guitar all weekend, and went to school on normal weekdays. Not EVERY day.

It's funny how media can give a twist on words.

If they played 15 hours all day long, they should be deaf. I mean that literally, ur ears can't take that much sound all day long.

You also don't learn much if you play that long. The focus will disappear.

I tried to learn stuff on guitar for as long as I could, and even on low volumes I ended up with a headache long before I reached the 15 hour mark. A brain can't handle that much info.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 21, 2009,
#18
Quote by edg
I think it's pretty simple. If you like to practice, you'll make the time for it.
Practicing doesn't HAVE to be boring. Practicing ANYTHING. Some people just don't
get the whole concept of practicing and they've CHOSEN to be bored. So, to them,
practicing for long lengths of time will seem unimaginable, but the reality for those
that enjoy it is that it's easy and the whole day is gone before you know it.

this, seriously. i don't practice for 6 hours straight anymore like i used to. but i still come home and have a tendency to just sit with my guitar in front of the tv and play for 5 or 10 minutes, then watch whatevers on for 5 or 10 minutes, play for another 5 or 10, watch for 5 or 10 and over a period of 4 hours this affords at least 2 hours of practice every night.

also its about wanting to practice, i might go a couple days without playing then when i pick it back up again i just cant put it down for hours.
#19
When you enjoy practice, You'll lose track of the amount of time you actually spend on the guitar. You'll have a rough idea but it wont be on the top of your head.

If you practice with one eye on the clock, it wont be enjoyable.


Those guitar gods you've mentioned loved their guitars and Im pretty sure they didnt have a rigid schedule to force themselves on the guitar.
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Think of learning the fretboard as being good at sex. You could always just feel your way around and hope it works, but it is alot better for everyone involved if you know where your going before you get there.
#20
Yeah well, Mark Hoppus practises 24 hours a day and he still sucks.Honestly, it's not about the amount of hours a day you practise, it's about how efficient your practice session is. You should look some more up about efficiency.
A few tips:
1) KNOW YOUR THEORY. This is like, 50% of your playing.
2) PRACTISE on a tempo you can easily do, and then build up speed. While doing so, keep on checking if your techniques okay.
3) HAVE FUN! This makes all the difference in the world.

Cheers.
Last edited by LordPino at Jan 21, 2009,
#21
it's hard to believe that anyone could literally play guitar nonstop for 10-15 hrs a day and not develop muscle and tendon problems from overwork.

I think quotes like that are an exaggeration, in the sense that the player may have had a few days or brief periods through his development where he would practice that much and make large gains in skill and prowess. Basically, they had a "eureka" moment, and it inspired them to play constantly for a few days.

Then you also have to factor in the idea that these guys are professional musicians. their full-time job is to play guitar and work on music. that takes up a lot of hours right there. if you include stuff like working on recordings, studying other music, scoring stuff, etc etc etc... and if you're playing a string of gigs around your recording dates, you play a LOT of fackin' guitar.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Jan 21, 2009,
#22
Quote by LordPino

1) KNOW YOUR THEORY. This is like, 50% of your playing.

no..... just... no. to clarify, i support learning theory but it has nothing at all to do with technique.
#23
Quote by z4twenny
no..... just... no. to clarify, i support learning theory but it has nothing at all to do with technique.


but if you know your theory, you'll be a lot more efficient when it comes to deciding what exercises you should work on, PLUS knowing theory gives you a better map of the fretboard in your mind, which can only help with technique. If you don't have to think as hard about which notes are the right notes, then you can focus on your technique a lot better.

#24
Quote by frigginjerk
but if you know your theory, you'll be a lot more efficient when it comes to deciding what exercises you should work on, PLUS knowing theory gives you a better map of the fretboard in your mind, which can only help with technique. If you don't have to think as hard about which notes are the right notes, then you can focus on your technique a lot better.


you seem to be sorely mistaken as to what technique is. technique is HOW you play the guitar, not WHICH NOTES you play.

as for deciding which exercises to work on, work on all of them or which ever ones you feel would serve your technique, an exercise shouldn't be just running up and down a scale, its making your fingers move how you want them to so you aren't limited to those scale "exercises" you did for hours. theory has nothing to do with this.

knowing theory won't really give you a better map of the fretboard, knowing which notes are where will do this and this has nothing to do with technique. as for having to "think hard" about which notes, if you have good technique you won't have to think about it at all, and THEN if you know a decent amount of theory you can focus on how you want your song to sound instead of spending your time focusing on technique.

lets make this perfectly clear

technique - how you play your instrument/s

music theory - a descriptive tool used to decipher and analyze music
Last edited by z4twenny at Jan 21, 2009,
#25
I never played nearly that much, but i did have some days where I had to play guitar for atleast 3-4 hours every day. That was mainly when I was first learning scales and building up my speed, i don't practice near that anymore.
#26
Quote by z4twenny
you seem to be sorely mistaken as to what technique is. technique is HOW you play the guitar, not WHICH NOTES you play. as for deciding which exercises to work on, work on all of them or which ever ones you feel would serve your technique. theory has nothing to do with this. knowing theory won't really give you a better map of the fretboard, knowing which notes are where will do this and this has nothing to do with technique. as for having to "think hard" about which notes, if you have good technique you won't have to think about it at all, and THEN if you know a decent amount of theory you can focus on how you want your song to sound instead of spending your time focusing on technique.

lets make this perfectly clear

technique - how you play your instrument/s

music theory - a descriptive tool used to decipher and analyze music


i'm sorry man, but I still disagree. Knowledge of each concept helps your progress in the other. If you don't agree, then I guess you just don't look at the big picture enough. All I know is that since I got a good handle on music theory, it's been easier to assess my technique.

how could it NOT be easier to work on finding all the best fingerings for minor thirds if you don't know what a minor third is?

anyways, go ahead and post again and call me a wanker or something. I've said what I need to say, and I've come to hate having big discussions on this forum where we just keep writing longer and longer messages to each other, each more condescending than the last, until everyone else gets bored of reading our bullcrap.
#27
Quote by frigginjerk

how could it NOT be easier to work on finding all the best fingerings for minor thirds if you don't know what a minor third is?
.

no, i see the bigger picture. the point you miss is this

it doesn't matter what a minor 3rd is in a technical aspect, only that your hands go where they need to go because you've trained them adequately. i'm not being condescending however it appears you can't handle being told you're wrong. that being the case theres nothing i can do to help you.

edit: if you want to see them as being intertwined then thats fine, but in the end i think that may only limit you.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jan 21, 2009,
#28
I've spent absurd amounts of time training for sports, so I don't think a 10-hour day of guitar practice is so unreasonable for someone who has worked their way up to that level of stamina; I didn't just decide that I was going to run 20ish miles twice a day; I ran a mile every day, then two, then three, etc. So I think the physical barrier can be broken, though a 5 minute break to get a drink, eat something, use the bathroom, or just relax is appropriate. The key is to not subject any muscle system (whether it be guitar or basketball conditioning) to an level of stress which it has never even close to experiencing. If you just try to bench press 200lbs for the hell of it, you're going to end up with the bar crashing down on your chest and broken ribs; start with a light amount and then see how far you can push yourself without excessive pain or risk of injury. The same applies to the guitar.
#29
Quote by z4twenny
no, i see the bigger picture. the point you miss is this

it doesn't matter what a minor 3rd is in a technical aspect, only that your hands go where they need to go because you've trained them adequately. i'm not being condescending however it appears you can't handle being told you're wrong. that being the case theres nothing i can do to help you.

edit: if you want to see them as being intertwined then thats fine, but in the end i think that may only limit you.


No. Actually, you are just trying to diss me( a 14 year old kid). And yet you fail at it.
Theory is a great thing. It makes your songs sound better( most of the time) and it helps you. See, you can try and improvise over a song, but if you don't know which key it is in/ which modes you can apply, you will fail almost as epically as you do.

Quote by z4twenny
no..... just... no. to clarify, i support learning theory but it has nothing at all to do with technique.



I said nothing about technique. I said learning theory would improve your PLAYING. Playing and technique is something different. I know, playing has 2 meanings.
Last edited by LordPino at Jan 21, 2009,
#30
Quote by Lurcher
Practice? Townshend? Hahahahahahaha

That's not funny what-so-ever.
Townshend's playing is the definition of rock n' roll.
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#31
my take: practice is where ego meets reality...

oh im good...im fast...ok...so what...

you think you know scales and extended dominate runs

is there a purpose/goal for knowing this and being able to play fast..

i just learned some scale runs that al di miola uses...they are "his" he can make them sound the way he plays..

i have to go very slow to get the fingering memorized...then the feel and gradually increase speed..

once this is done...then transpose into different keys...experiment with the rhythms etc

then integrate it into my playing style...make it "mine"...my sound

this is work...practice is maintaining your skill level and increase it , adding new ingredients to it...

if music is your life/livelihood you have no choice but to practice...not to practice in this regard is self-destructive...like not eating when your hungry

the amount of practice per day is not set in stone ... nor will the results be the same every day...if you can achieve an inner goal in two hours there is no need to continue for fifteen

knowing when to stop!...is a valuable skill in "practice"

also...knowing how to breath/relax and keep your attitude in check is part of practice...

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Jan 21, 2009,
#32
Quote by z4twenny
i'm not being condescending however it appears you can't handle being told you're wrong. that being the case theres nothing i can do to help you.



...


It is an argument about nothing. They are words. The practice of theory is within the proper meaning of technique (a way of accomplishing a task that is not immediately obvious) but in a guitarist's vocabulary it most often means the physical arena of playing, the practice aimed at diminishing the limitations of flesh.


But - the 10 hour day is too much. Humans cannot learn that much at once (maybe as a child, but by 18-20 years it has dropped off); after a point, well before 10 hours of straight work, the retention vanishes, and you are practicing things that you will have to relearn. It is a better strategy to make your practice more effective. 1 hour of good practice, 1 of transcription, and some time spent studying in abstract, is enough for a day, if you are consistent and methodical.
#33
I've spent 15 hours studying with just a few breaks several times when I had finals approaching. A person is able to spend much more than three consecutive hours on learning. Do you really think medical students spend three hours/day studying? I wouldn't want someone like that as my doctor!
#34
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I've spent 15 hours studying with just a few breaks several times when I had finals approaching. A person is able to spend much more than three consecutive hours on learning. Do you really think medical students spend three hours/day studying? I wouldn't want someone like that as my doctor!


That's only theoretic.

If ur fingers can hold out for 15 hours non-stop, you must be no1 finger athlete with that kind of stamina

Also ur ears will get tired if you hear practice exercises all day. Unless you practice without amp, but then you miss out on all the dynamics.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 21, 2009,
#36
Quote by LordPino
No. Actually, you are just trying to diss me( a 14 year old kid). And yet you fail at it.
at no point did i even try to "diss" you, i don't know where you are getting this from other than being proven wrong. the fact that you're 14 is irrelevent.
Quote by LordPino

Theory is a great thing. It makes your songs sound better( most of the time) and it helps you.
ok we can agree, theory rocks. as for making your songs sound "better" good and bad in music is entirely subjective.
Quote by LordPino

See, you can try and improvise over a song, but if you don't know which key it is in/ which modes you can apply, you will fail almost as epically as you do.

see you can try and improvise over a song but if your hands won't do what you want them to, you'll fail. see what i did there? as per my original statement they're 2 different things and don't directly affect each other. though i will admit they can both affect the final outcome.
Quote by LordPino

I said nothing about technique. I said learning theory would improve your PLAYING. Playing and technique is something different. I know, playing has 2 meanings.

*facepalm* yes we were deliberating the technique aspect of it and i'm pretty sure you said that music theory helps technique, which it doesn't . i won't argue that it can directly affect how you play which is the overall summation of what you've learned.
#37
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I never said that it should be done "non-stop." However, with short breaks, I believe that something like Vai's 30 hour plan is possible.


It is possible, but only in u comfortzone.

You can't break boundaries (technique/speed etc.). For 15 hours long, you'd be the no1 guitar player within a month.

Or be in hospital for tendonitis within a month.

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Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 21, 2009,
#38
I doubt they practiced more than 8 hrs a day, regularly. That is quite easy if you have the time.
#39
i believe THAT extent of practice is bad. It's more taxing on your body than need be necessary and it is probably coming from a place of insecurity as well as a desire to get better.

I used to do that. Now I try for 3 or 4.
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#40
Quote by wolflen

knowing when to stop!...is a valuable skill in "practice"


wolf

so ****ing true. it sucks though. like when im up at 1 in the morning and still cant nail a section of a classical piece, and have to admit i cant do it until the next day. i get so pissed off
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