#1
So I went out jamming with a friend of mine. As it is, he's really the only other friend I have who spends time learning music theory and isn't completely blinded by it. We were playing, I was doing lead, and he started playing something in E(I forget how to exactly describe it) but whatever it was, he left out the third entirely. So I was free to play around with E minor and E major, however I wanted.

My question is, is that what pitch axis is? Or was I just modulating?
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#2
E minor : E F# G A B C D
E major : E F# G# A B C# D#
So that's E, F#, A and B in common so if he only used those notes in his progression you could colour the rest yourself, he probably played something with E5, A5 and B5.
I don't think pitch axis is relevant.
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#3
Essentially, yes that's pitch axis.

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#4
now is

"I ii iii IV V vii Dim" for e minor
the same as

for E Major.

or do the progressions change?
#5
Quote by Thirdeye85
now is

"I ii iii IV V vii Dim" for e minor
the same as

for E Major.

or do the progressions change?


No.

E minor = Im IIdim III IVm Vm VI VII (natural minor)
E major = What you said.
#6
Quote by Thirdeye85
now is

"I ii iii IV V vii Dim" for e minor
the same as

for E Major.

or do the progressions change?

Progressions are different for major and minor keys.

For any major key: I ii iii IV V vi viidim
For any minor key: i iidim III iv v or V VI VII
#7
Quote by kampfgolem
No.

E minor = Im IIdim III IVm Vm VI VII (natural minor)
E major = What you said.


There is no key of natural minor, and completely diationic minor progression is rarely used.
#8
Quote by blueriver
There is no key of natural minor, and completely diationic minor progression is rarely used.


I was pointing out the fact that Thirdeye85 put the chords for E major chords under "E minor". Also, while there's no "natural minor key", there's a "harmonized natural minor scale".

Sure, 'diatonic minor' would be more like Aeolian actually.
Last edited by kampfgolem at Jan 29, 2009,
#9
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