#1
Ok, so i've sort of taught myself guitar, but all I do is read tabs and have zero formal training, so excuse me if this is a stupid question:

I'm trying to figure out if there is a way for me to figure out how to play a "chord" version of one single note. The best way i can explain this is, if someone asked you to hum a chord, you can only hum one note...so to me this means that the chord "sounds" like that single note.

so for example:

if someone asked me to hum:

-
1
-
2
3
-
- I hum "E"

And for

2
3
2
-
-
- I hum F#


What i want to do is, if i come up with a song in my head, or a series of chords, all i can think in my head is single notes, and how i'd like it to sound...

Is there a way to figure out that if i'm humming "E" in my head, which chord will give me the same sound?
#2
The second chord is a D, so you'd probably hum a D.

You're probably humming the root note of the chord you want, so you could hum, then slide to a note on your guitar that matches, and then form the chord around that.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#4
first is a c, second is a d

you need to look at the root note

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#6
Quote by rob330
Ok, so i've sort of taught myself guitar, but all I do is read tabs and have zero formal training, so excuse me if this is a stupid question:

I'm trying to figure out if there is a way for me to figure out how to play a "chord" version of one single note. The best way i can explain this is, if someone asked you to hum a chord, you can only hum one note...so to me this means that the chord "sounds" like that single note.

so for example:

if someone asked me to hum:

-
1
-
2
3
-
- I hum "E"

And for

2
3
2
-
-
- I hum F#


What i want to do is, if i come up with a song in my head, or a series of chords, all i can think in my head is single notes, and how i'd like it to sound...

Is there a way to figure out that if i'm humming "E" in my head, which chord will give me the same sound?


From what I can tell (if you are actually humming what you're saying) You're humming the major third of each chord. Thats the interval that gives a chord its tonality, flatten it and the chord becomes minor.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#7
I like ur 7 string guitar for the C chord lol. Basically if you hum an E note, the chord that will sound best around it is an E chord (major, minor, augmented, diminished, whatever) because its root note is an E and all the scale tones are relative to the E. However, many chords contain an E note like C Major, but you will hear the C note more prominently than the E note when you play the C chord. Hope that made sense
Æ
#8
TheGallowsPole is right - you're singing the middle note of the triad ('E' as in 'C-E-G' and 'F#" as in 'D-F#-A' - which is sort of weird, because the third is what gives the chord tonality (major or minor) as opposed to the root and fifth which sort of reinforce each other.

there are lots of different ways to harmonize, but generally sticking with chords that use notes from the melody (or vice versa) is a good way to go - try inversion of chords too (for example, making the 3rd the lowest note)
#9
actually....any note you hum...will work with ANY chord that contains that note. if your workin with a C triad....humming C, E, or G will fit. just play around with it...and if your head is telling you your humming E...your already miles ahead of me...
#10
thank you guys so much.

I really need to make a concentrated effort to learn more about all the formal stuff, i think i'll put songwriting on hold untill i at least know my way around a little better.
#11
last year I wrote lyrics to a song I made up in about an hour.I have no idea what or how to write music for it.
Without getting into exactly what the song is - I got the idea for it along the side of a highway under an overpass during a heavy rainstorm while I was riding my motorcycle. The song ended up being in my head similar to a slower Montgomery Gentry song. Not only did it apply at the time to being stuck out on the road in the rain , but it actually related to life in general being stuck in a hard time .
A couple people who actually play for a semi-living (i.e-way better than me)have read it and said it is a very impressive piece.
Last edited by HCherrySG at Jan 21, 2009,
#12
This topic reminded me of when I was a kid learning the piano. I'd play, say, the F major scale up and down, then play the F on its own and the single note would sound "major" to me in my head. Then, after playing the F minor scale up and down, the F note on its own would sound minor. I could never understand why. Later on, I learnt theory and I stopped asking such "silly" questions.

Anyway, I think when you hum a single note, you're actually thinking about a full chord. You don't hum a full chord because you can't hum more than one note. Music theory will tell you that for a single note there are at least three chords you could be thinking of. So yeah, even with theory you'll have to use a bit of trial and error.
#13
Quote by anotherbluesguy
Music theory will tell you that for a single note there are at least three chords you could be thinking of.



it's a hell of a lot more than three if your talking about all the chords that contain that note.

if the note you are humming is the root note there would be 4 basic types of chords, and tons more variations.
#14
If you're in a particular context there might be only three, for instance as a triad in a diatonic scale. I can't think of a context where there are less than three. Hence, I say "at least three".