#1
I get a really annoying buzz from my amp (increasing the EQ's and adding pedals make it worse). And I noticed that the amp has no earth wire (only 2 pins on the plug, and no earths on the side).

Is that why I'm getting this awful noise? Or is it something else?

Here's my situation :

Amp is pretty much silent when nothing is connected, but when the volume, gain, distortion, and all EQ controls are pulled up all the way, it gives a horrible static noise.

And when I play normally my guitar w/o my pedals, it gives out a annoying buzz when not held, playing ringing out notes, etc, and when the pedals are added, it just makes it worse, and the wah just increases the hum and nothing else
#3
Well, it might not be the lack of ground. Ive got an old amp from the 50s that has a 2 plug (both of the same size) cord, and it only buzzes when I plug it in the wrong way (even tho the plugs are the same size it does need to be plugged in a certain way).
'11 Gibson LP Jr.
'07 Gretsch 5120
'69 Tele
'10 Godin 5th Ave. Kingpin
'03 Blueridge Dreadnought
'02 Custom Martin D-28
Premier Twin-8
Fender Hot Rod Dlx
Boss SD-1
#4
Hm, if you wanted another option, the amp might not be getting regulated power from your wall socket either. But my money is still on the ground-lackage.
#5
Quote by uzeial
Hm, if you wanted another option, the amp might not be getting regulated power from your wall socket either. But my money is still on the ground-lackage.


Oh ok,

Is there a way to solve this problem?
#6
Oh and I forgot to mention one more thing,

the amp is a 110V amp, so I have to use a small step-up transformer to turn it up to 230V so i can use it. Does this have any effect on the amp's sound quality?
#8
A power conditioner or a new amp. Or, if you're handy with wires, add a grounded plug in place of the old one. The latter however is a terrible idea unless you 110% know what you're doing.
#9
The old days 2 same size prong plug when plugged in backwards the ground is hot etc. This will add noise also can give you a shock if you touch the chassis. I had an old ampeg and I went and bought a modern 3 prong cable to put in the amp. A proper ground makes a huge difference in buzz and hum. The converter might not be helping depending on how good of one it is. A possibility is to get a transformer put in it along with a proper power cable for your electric system.
#10
Quote by nemesis_911
Oh and I forgot to mention one more thing,

the amp is a 110V amp, so I have to use a small step-up transformer to turn it up to 230V so i can use it. Does this have any effect on the amp's sound quality?


Wait a second.

You're saying it's a 110V amp, and you need a step-up transformer to run 230V into it. 230V into a 110V amp doesn't make a lot of sense.

If it's a 230V amp and you are using a step up transformer, that makes sense. In which case, a transformer will induce some kind of noise. The fluctuating magnetic field is probably generating some kind of signal in your amp/cables somewhere along the line. Proper shielding , moving the transformer away, orienting the transformer differently and buying a plug with grounding could all make a massive difference. Try a few.
#11
Quote by ljohn
Wait a second.

You're saying it's a 110V amp, and you need a step-up transformer to run 230V into it. 230V into a 110V amp doesn't make a lot of sense.

If it's a 230V amp and you are using a step up transformer, that makes sense. In which case, a transformer will induce some kind of noise. The fluctuating magnetic field is probably generating some kind of signal in your amp/cables somewhere along the line. Proper shielding , moving the transformer away, orienting the transformer differently and buying a plug with grounding could all make a massive difference. Try a few.


oh, sorry. My mistake...

I meant a STEP-DOWN transformer... I have to convert 230V to 110V...

and besides, if i was using a step-up transformer... the amp won't work. It would just probably go up in flames....

And one more thing, the amp CANNOT be grounded. There is no grounding wire coming from the amp to use a normal plug with grounding

And sorry for the late reply, my computer was not working for a while
#12
same problem i'm having ..i opened a thread ..though i searched but i didn't see this one
i still got no reply
but i'm gonna check the Ground Loop Isolator from Radioshack

i think it could help
"When I tried to play something and screwed up, I'd hear some other note that would come into play. Then I started trying different things to find the beauty in it."
-Dimebag Darrell
#13
I went and bought a 3 prong cord and put it in the amp. This gave a polarized plug(no more ground is hot problems). And the 3rd prong gave a chassis ground. But rather than use a step down adapter just see about getting a proper power transformer put in the amp thats made for your electric system. If its going to be used with 230 permanently might as well fix things.
#14
I'm reluctant to give advice from the other side of the world when there are so many possible variations of fault and fiddling with earthing if you are not certain of what you are doing could kill you. Equally not fixing a faulty earth could kill you.

Number One: be careful!

since the problem cuts when you touch the strings the problem looks like radio frequency pickup. The coil in your pickup, your lead and the wiring inside your guitar all act as an aerial sytem and pick up electrical noise. When it gets back to your amp it is rectified and turned into the niose you can hear. The transformer is likely to be one designed for a building site and will be the noisiest thing around but there will be plenty of other things joining in the havoc, do you have any dimmer switches.

You can get rid of some of this by moving things around; like when you move a radio to get the best signal but in reverse.

Earthing the sytem will increase the shielding from the electrical noise, which is what you are doing when you touch the strings. You could earth the amplifier through a screw into the metal chassis on the amp and some amps have a terminal on the back to do this. It will be marked wth a symbol like an upside down fir tree.
____I____
_____
___
_

Something like this:

Be very careful if you are going to poke around inside your amp please you can still get shocked even after it is turned off.

If you do decide to try earthing your amp then use an RCD cicuit breaker to protect yourself, don't kill yourself before you become a rock legend.

Good luck
#15
Hey thanks to all for the replies. I've read all of them and came to a conclusion :
- I can't do this on my own


I just remembered, I forgot to mention one thing...

My amp doesn't have a switch to turn on/off distortion. Just a knob saying distortion.

Turning it down to '0' just gives it a very muddy, weird sounding clean sound. And cranking it to 10 gives a not so bad, but not so awesome distortion.
And unfortunately both "channels" give the buzz.

Is this a reason for the buzz?

Hehe, sorry for asking all these questions on the thread, I hope I'm not being a asshole