#1
One of my favorite chords to throw in is an E7#9, I just love the way that it sounds. I know that in a I-IV-V progression, its common to play a V7. When are good times to play chords such as the 7#9?
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#4
Quote by one vision
Isn't that the "Hendrix" chord?


Oh yes.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#5
Quote by one vision
Isn't that the "Hendrix" chord?

Yes, its the Purple Haze chord.

Basically, what the guy above me said. Its just a dominant 7th chord with a sharp 9th on the top.... exactly what the chord says.
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The times they are a-changin'
#6
Quote by TheGallowsPole
When are good times to play chords such as the 7#9?

In the key of A (Harmonic) Minor.

Bm7b5 / E7#9 / Am9

-----7
-6-8-5
-7-7-5
-7-6-5
---7-
-7---5
#7
^ Very tasty

Generally, you could substitute any 7b9 with a 7#9. And usually 7b9 is used in situations to make a stronger cadence when using secondary dominants for example.

Mdc's example shows how you resolve nicely to Aminor, by using a substitution of the v-chord with a V7#9 chord.
#9
It's just an altered dominant chord. It could take the place of almost any V7 chord in a progression, though I wouldn't do it without telling the person playing over it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
The two basic shapes are:


e|---|---|-0-|
B|---|---|-0-|
G|-0-|---|---|
D|---|-0-|---|
A|---|---|---|
E|---|---|---|


and


e|---|---|---|
B|---|---|-0-|
G|---|-0-|---|
D|-0-|---|---|
A|---|-0-|---|
E|---|---|---|


Taking the first as your I chord and the second as your V, you can make a 12 bar blues using the following as your IV:


e|---|---|-0-|
B|---|-0-|---|
G|---|-0-|---|
D|---|-0-|---|
A|---|---|---|
E|---|---|---|
#12
Quote by Aetius
^ Very tasty

Generally, you could substitute any 7b9 with a 7#9. And usually 7b9 is used in situations to make a stronger cadence when using secondary dominants for example.

Mdc's example shows how you resolve nicely to Aminor, by using a substitution of the v-chord with a V7#9 chord.

^ Thanx.

TS, I forgot to mention that aswell as ii-V-I's, look at one-six-two fives in both major and minor.

Try adding in some higher extensions on the chords, you can get some pretty cool shizzle.

I'm quite a jazzy person tho, so all this crap might not appeal to you, but there's some ideas for you to utilize the altered V chord.
Last edited by mdc at Jan 22, 2009,
#13
I like to substitute E7#9 for a lot of C major sounds, Bb dominant sounds and also, of course, for e minor and E dominant type sounds.
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Ah, when you've done a line or two"
#14
Quote by mr_magic
I like to substitute E7#9 for a lot of C major sounds, Bb dominant sounds and also, of course, for e minor and E dominant type sounds.

Tritone subs ftw.

I forgot to mention, again, to swap the #9 for a b9, especially in iio to V movement. Like in A (Harmonic) Minor, the note F just sits there while the other notes move around it causing the F to change function. It's a nice transition.