#1
Think this is the right forum.

I want to start writing some dance music kind of similar to Children by Robert Miles or William Orbits Barbers adagio for strings. A piece which starts off quiet and builds up though the song.

I have an idea of what I want for the drums, but I don't really know what I can do for the music. Is there any scales or chords that are used in dance music? And what free program would be best to get dance sounds.

Thanks for any help.
TRANSFORMICE






#2
I've never written any music for a specific audience, but if you want people to be able to dance to your music, remain in the same time signature and tempo through the entire song; make sure that time signature is 4/4, unless you want a waltz, which is 3/4. You don't want to have tempo alterations as the idea of dancing is to kind of ignore most of the music and just move to the rhythm; drastic tempo changes, as well as meter changes, throw off the dancers. Try dancing to (the poorly named) The Dance of Eternity by Dream Theater.
#3
lol I see what you mean, that's a good starting place then. I'll stick to 4/4, but I still don't have any ideas on scales, chords or programs I could use.

Also, I'll be trying to make it as unrocky as possible, so imagine the new Bloc Party album without the small guitar parts and that's something I would aim for.
TRANSFORMICE






#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I guess I'd just stick with the major scale. I IV V progressions seem effective for this.


Dance music isn't just cliched happy house you know
#6
Look at the sheet music for Antonin Dvorak's Slavonic Dance's (I assume you can read sheet music). I would start by going here http://all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php, and finding a good melody to start with, and then building the chord progression.

If you want to start with the chord progression first, the Passamezzo moderno progression would be good base for your song. And switch between that and the passamezzo antico, whilst you "build up the song".
#7
Quote by iiseddie
Look at the sheet music for Antonin Dvorak's Slavonic Dance's (I assume you can read sheet music). I would start by going here http://all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php, and finding a good melody to start with, and then building the chord progression.

If you want to start with the chord progression first, the Passamezzo moderno progression would be good base for your song. And switch between that and the passamezzo antico, whilst you "build up the song".


I can't read sheet music lol, I'll see if my gf can teach me, and thanks for that. I don't know about those progressions, but I'll deffinately look them up. I'm deffo looking to build up the song, so hopefully those progressions will help!
TRANSFORMICE






#8
Try dancing to (the poorly named) The Dance of Eternity by Dream Theater.


Off topic: The title is a reference to the final line in Metropolis Pt. 1, which reads "Love is the Dance of Eternity". The song The Dance of Eternity describes the protagonists of the concept album making (presumably very kinky) love.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by tallicafan888
I can't read sheet music lol, I'll see if my gf can teach me, and thanks for that. I don't know about those progressions, but I'll deffinately look them up. I'm deffo looking to build up the song, so hopefully those progressions will help!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passamezzo_moderno
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passamezzo_antico

How to read sheet music EGBDF, FACE. Even George Bush Drives Fast and Face - err.... that's how I remembered it at first....

An easy way to write music would be to get power tab. Write the chord progressions I showed you in it for a flute/string part. *To write the chord progressions (if you have no background in music theory) go here http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_progressions.php.

Ex: The Passamezzo moderno progression is I|IV|I|V|| I|IV|I-V|I||. So that means in F Harmonic Minor it would be Fm, A#m, Fm, C, Fm, A#m, Fm-C, Fm.

Then just pick a scale that fits over it (why not the F harmonic minor scale?) and write a melody over it.

Then just take that Power Tab file export it as a midi and touch it up in a nicer program like melody assistant (it's free, but harder to write in if you don't read sheet music).

That's extremely basic, but it should come out sounding pretty good.
#10
Well I'm no expert, but that should be a pretty basic, and easy way to write "dance sounding music".