#1
I got an email from my local guitar shop that they are having an open jam session for intermediate players and will be using 'The Real Book', supposedly it is listed as a main standard for players to use. I am simply a beginner, and this is still quite beyond my level, but I would like to use it as a goal to get to.

Here is a link to the book in question

As I understand it, it is written for any instrument to be able to play it. Concerning guitar, how would you read it? Would you read it in standard music notation by knowing all of the notes on the fretboard, or would you read it by the chord names listed above the music bar? I'm wondering because I would think that blues or jazz would be played note by note, and not just strumming a chord..or am I missing something?

I give thanks in advance for any info, as it is greatly appreciated. Again, I'm far from this level, but I figure it would be a good goal to work towards.
Gear-
MIM Strat Standard
Epiphone Les Paul Ultra
Fender Champion 600 amp
Seagull Coastline S6 GT
#2
The real book normally provides both jazz chord symbols and the melody played by the lead instrument, it is normally designed for any instrument really.

If you know your chord arrangements and can sight read fairly quickly then you should be able to get through the popular jazz tracks featured in the real book. I do read from this book during Jazz band at uni
#3
It's basically essential to any jazz player as it provides a whole heap of Jazz heads (intros). basically like 300 pages or so of music, possibly even more, i havent looked at it for a while so dont quote me.
#4
It depends on whether you're comping or playing the head. If you're comping, you read the chord symbols. If you're playing the head, you read the notation.
#5
Would a book like this coupled with a chord book be a good learning tool for a beginner (about two months of playing or so), or would it be too advanced?

I'm thinking of going this way, but I don't want to overwhelm myself at the same time...
Gear-
MIM Strat Standard
Epiphone Les Paul Ultra
Fender Champion 600 amp
Seagull Coastline S6 GT
#6
Basically it will include chords not normally found in comtemporary Rock and Pop music (Dom 7ths etc, all written in notation), its just a case of establishing what makes up each chord. In hindsight, if you have no idea of theory or reading skills then i would recommend the Real Books as good as they may be.
#7
I can actually read music quite well (from 8years of playing trumpet back in the day) so I understand all of that...just have to work on learning and memorizing the notes on the fretboard.
Gear-
MIM Strat Standard
Epiphone Les Paul Ultra
Fender Champion 600 amp
Seagull Coastline S6 GT
#8
Ah ok then man, just judging you compaired to most of the other 2 month old players on these boards

Yeah, then i would totally recommend them, its just a case of learning your notes on the fretboard and applying the theory knowledge you already have really. Learning melodies from popular jazz tunes will ultimately help your phrasing on the guitar, plus the technique and speed used will help in all styles.


I apologise if i'm not making sense, early hours of the morning you know.
#9
Quote by hmmm_de_hum
Basically it will include chords not normally found in comtemporary Rock and Pop music (Dom 7ths etc, all written in notation), its just a case of establishing what makes up each chord. In hindsight, if you have no idea of theory or reading skills then i would recommend the Real Books as good as they may be.


What? The chords are just symbols. They aren't written in notation.
#10
Yeah man, sorry the melodic lines are in notation, the chords are just in symbols (implying chord structure knowledge).


I do apologise, it is late and i seem to have surpassed my usefulness.
#11
Quote by Holy Katana
What? The chords are just symbols. They aren't written in notation.

I think he meant written out like Em7b5, and with all the chord symbols.
EDIT: Guess not.
You'll have a tough time with a lot of the chords if you've only been playing for two months. I've been learning the chords to Black Orpheus (which is in that book) for my school band, and there are some pretty wacky chords and some really fast changes.