#1
Wow, I've been playing for one year, and I really think I have been doing this wrong.
According to my Epi's manual, you are supposed to fret the 12th fret, pluck the string, then check the tuner.

But apparently, you are supposed to pluck the string open, then check the tuner, and tune accordingly.

So which is it, 12th fret then tune, or open string then tune?

Sorry for the stupid question.
Set-Up:
- Ibanez RGA42FM
- Epiphone Les Paul Special II
- Crate 15W Amp
- Boss MT-2 Metal Zone Pedal
- Line 6 Pocket Pod

- Peavey International II Drum Set (Cherry Red)
- Zildjian Cymbals
- Evans Heads with Remo E-Rings
#3
Either is fine. The 12th is the same note as open, just an octave higher.
#5
i've always done it open, which is how my guitar teacher taught me how to do it.
#6
Oh, so it makes no difference? I didn't think it would.
Thanks for the quick replies.
Set-Up:
- Ibanez RGA42FM
- Epiphone Les Paul Special II
- Crate 15W Amp
- Boss MT-2 Metal Zone Pedal
- Line 6 Pocket Pod

- Peavey International II Drum Set (Cherry Red)
- Zildjian Cymbals
- Evans Heads with Remo E-Rings
#7
tune to open, then you should be tuned on 12th or your intonation is off

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#8
I wasn't even taught. I was too scared to ask my Guitar teacher. lol. I just pugged it in and figured it out from there.
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#9
Actually, it does matter which way you tune a guitar. By performing the initial tuning by fretting at the 12th fret, you may be off for all of the open strings. Here's why. Whenever you fret a string, you stretch the string. This stretching effects the intonation of the guitar. It's small, but discriminating ears will pick it up in a hearbeat.
You should always tune the open, unfretted strings. Check intonation by testing the open string notes against the fretted 12th(not the harmonic).
You can also cross check your initial tuning by playing the same notes across the whole fretboard. One way is to check all of the strings against the correctly tuned open high E string. Find and play that E note on all of the other strings and compare to the fine tuned high E. If there is any wavering, out of tune sound, fine tune each string further.
You can also cross check even further by comparing harmonics to fretted notes. Start at the low E string and perform a harmonic on the 12th fret. While it's ringing out, fret and play the note of the A string at the 7th fret. They will be the same note, and again listen for that out of sync wavering sound. This works for all of the strings until you get to the G/B string comparison. Harmonic at the 12th fret of the G string like the rest, but fret the B string at the 8th fret instead of the 7th, since it's tuned differently from the others.
A fine tuned instrument will tattle on itself by doing these cross checks. End result: your music sounds better.