#1
There is a song I am learning that my band and I are going to play at a gig in March and it requires an octave chord to be picked rapidly (to the 32nd)
EX.
E--10---9------4--
B-------------------
G---7----6-----1--
D-------------------
A-------------------
E-------------------

Is there an approach to doing this correctly?
Last edited by powerchord117 at Jan 22, 2009,
#2
For starters i'd play it like this;
E------
B------
G--19-18-13
D-----
A--17-16-11
E----

I just find it's easier to play octaves on those strings. Just make sure you have all strings other than the A and G muted, especially the D, I found that to be the hardest to mute at first, mute it with the lower part of your index finger. Other than that it's fairly simple.
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#4
yes in fact, when I mute the b string, the harmony for the fret my finger is over rings out a bit.
#5
Quote by powerchord117
yes in fact, when I mute the b string, the harmony for the fret my finger is over rings out a bit.

You mean the harmonic? Just dig into the string a bit more when muting and it wont ring. This is another reason why I prefer to play the octaves higher, not much chance of harmonics
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#6
1. Finger chord.
2. Use free fingers to mute other strings. If you use the middle and pinky finger for the chords, you could just extend your index across the fretboard. Whatever works.
3. Tremolo pick.
4. ???
5. Profit.
This space foreclosed, due to the ailing economy.