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#41
I finished reading the little engine that could. It was very inspiring.
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#42
love ben elton, i know the guy gets some stick and criticism but i always find myself engrossed in whatever he writes....dead famous, high society to name a couple.

Just now though i have finished reading 'Yes Man' by Danny Wallace, i know the film has been released but i forgot i had the book (published in 2005). His stlye of writing is great and very funny. I am easily pleased.

Maybe an idea to think about if its not been done already....Books turned into films, good or bad?
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#43
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card is amazing. I finished half of it in one day.

1984 is also a must-read.

If you're a fantasy fan, I suggest reading Wheel of Time and A Song of Ice and Fire.
#44
I'm readin Lolita by Nabokov again at the moment along with Lord of the Rings for the billionth time.
It's nice to have some variety.

Then I'm going to read the major works of Oscar Wilde along with The Silmarillion, Notes From Undergound - Dostoevsky, Haunted - Palahniuk, The Metamorphosis - Kafka and Perfume Patrick Suskind.

I've been buying books but not having the time to enjoy them due to school work/work but now I'm getting time off so I can get through those. I managed to get all of those books cheap due to a friend of mine working in a bookshop, I'm quite spoiled really.

I have just under 100 books in my library and I couldn't name a favourite. IT by Stephen King is the first in my mind, along with most of my Pratchett collection (The Colour of Magic, Guards!Guards!, Going Postal etc. being some of my favourites).

About dystopian novels, I just finished reading Brave New World and I was underwhelmed to say the least, the idea was excellent behind it but the characters annoyed me and the ending was dire. I must just not be a fan of dystopian novels though because I felt the same way about 1984...
Animal Farm, I thought, was a lot better than 1984, I read it in a night.

RMF


I was much further out than you thought
And not waving but drowning.
I was much too far out all my life
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Last edited by Mr. La Fritz at Jan 22, 2009,
#45
I'm not in the mood to run through my list of favourites, as I've done so in nearly every book thread that comes around.

But I finished reading Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell, it's easily in my top five favourite books. It's effectively Orwell's memoirs of living in poverty and destitute in Paris and London. Very funny, grim and an amazing portrait of poverty in the two cities.

I've started American Scream - a biography of Bill Hicks, very interesting, nicely written, although I know half of the story already.

To read next:

Homage to Catalonia - George Orwell
Hell's Angels ~ Better than Sex - Hunter S. Thompson
On The Road - Jack Kerouac.
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#46
I am reading 'A History of God' by Karen Armstrong, and Will Self's 'Psychogeography'. Both of which are excellent.
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#47
i started The Road by Cormac McCarthy the other day, but i'm not too far into it. i'm not understanding the praise for him, perhaps that will will when i am more than 15 pages along.

i'm also taking a class on William Blake where we are reading pretty much everything that he has ever done. really intriguing stuff. i suggest that you at least read something by him, it is all easy to get your hands on.
#48
Reading Fear and Loathing at the mo, not quite finished yet but so far it's infinitely better than the film, and i'm gonna go out to get Kerouac's On The Road pretty much the second i finish it
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#49
Quote by freddaahh
Homage to Catalonia - George Orwell

PRETENTIOUS BIG TEXT ALERT

Just getting your attention. This is Orwell's best book. Screw 1984, screw Animal Farm, this book is fantastic and beats both.

I'm currently reading Confessions of a Crap Artist by Philip K. Dick which is an interesting read I guess. After that I'm bashing through To Kill A Mockingbird, IT, The Picture of Dorian Gray. If I don't try bashing through the Dark Tower series after that, I'm gonna get through The Birth of Tragedy by Nietzsche and hopefully a range of Sartre, Russell and finish off reading The Republic, a book I've given up on a few times as, well, it's actually quite bad.

Going through the classics in my Waterstones, a book caught by eye. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. It was huge but it captured my interest. Any word on this?
#50
At the moment, amongst quite a few others, I'm mostly reading Margaret Atwood's 'The Handmaid's Tale'. I thought I'd hate it because I've read some of her short stories and found her really, really annoying to read. But I'm reading this and so far I'm enjoying it. Seems to work a lot better as a concept than the short stories I've read. Blatantly majorly Orwellian, but that's a good thing in my books. Having said that, I'm only on chapter 8 or something, I may well hate it by the end.
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#51
Quote by uhh_me?
i'm also taking a class on William Blake where we are reading pretty much everything that he has ever done. really intriguing stuff. i suggest that you at least read something by him, it is all easy to get your hands on.

I'm gonna have to say that Songs of Innocence and Experience is one of the greatest books ever written. It's poetry and is probably worth further reading to get a greater grasp of the writing. It's astonishingly good.
#52
Quote by Gunpowder
I recommend Dalton Trumbo's "Johnny Got His Gun." About a soldier who gets his arms, legs, eyes, ears, nose, and mouth cut off from a shell during war; one of the best books I've ever read.

F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" is, I think, the great american novel. A must read and a classic.

"Wasp" by Eric Frank Russell is one of the best sci-fi books I've read. About a guy who goes to a planet that Earth's at war with, his appearance surgically altered, to wage a "singular war" with the planet through stickers, propaganda, etc. to try to make the planet think a rebellion is imminent. Very interesting read.

Stephen King's "The Dark Tower" series is about as epic a fantasy series as it gets.

"To Kill a Mockingbird" is one of the best books I've ever read. If you haven't already, go read it now. Huzzah, Atticus Finch!

"Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card took me less than two days to read through. I couldn't put it down; again, a sci-fi must-read.

Those are my suggestions. Cheers guys


I'd have to disagree with one suggestion, it being The Great Gatsby. That was a terribly boring book, I don't think anyone should have to read it. It's a well written book in the sense of being more going on than meets the eye, but the actual story of it is quite dull.

Hehe even my grandfather, who is an avid reader, said didn't enjoy it.
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#53
Quote by Craigo
PRETENTIOUS BIG TEXT ALERT
Just getting your attention. This is Orwell's best book. Screw 1984, screw Animal Farm, this book is fantastic and beats both.
[...]
Going through the classics in my Waterstones, a book caught by eye. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. It was huge but it captured my interest. Any word on this?

your large text has gotten me interested. i'll put that on my "to read list"

as for W+P, it is worth the read, if only for these reasons:
1. to say you have read it
2. the sense of accomplishment you feel when you are finally done with it
3. you will never be intimidated by another book for as long as you live
4. it is actually pretty darn good

Quote by Craigo
I'm gonna have to say that Songs of Innocence and Experience is one of the greatest books ever written. It's poetry and is probably worth further reading to get a greater grasp of the writing. It's astonishingly good.

i just finished (re)reading that for class and i was actually going to suggest that as a starting point for Blake. i also have really enjoyed The Book Of Thel.
#54
Quote by uhh_me?
as for W+P, it is worth the read, if only for these reasons:
1. to say you have read it
2. the sense of accomplishment you feel when you are finally done with it
3. you will never be intimidated by another book for as long as you live
4. it is actually pretty darn good

So... To feed my ego? I'm sold

I hate having big reading lists though
#55
So I know as far as Kerouac goes, On The Road gets the most attention generally, but I think that Dharma Bums was actually much better.
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#56
Quote by slidething31
So I know as far as Kerouac goes, On The Road gets the most attention generally, but I think that Dharma Bums was actually much better.

i actually couldn't finish On The Road, but from what i have heard i am willing to give Dharma Bums a shot.
#57
i'd have to agree with...who ever said "To Kill a Mockingbird", that is a great book, i've read it twice now. i think it defines that "stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone" mentalilty

another good book...er...series i guess is the Eragon books, if you like that dragons n magic stuff, i have yet to read the third one tho...im getting there.

Edit: and The Outsiders
Last edited by [-=-[D-Roc]-=-] at Jan 22, 2009,
#58
Just reading a Rebus book by Ian Rankin. The specific name escapes me, but tis good, I've not read a nice thriller for a while.
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#59
The Wheel Of Time books are brilliant for fantasy fanatics. Masterpieces in my opinion.

My dad told me that a book called "The Mote In God's Eye" is a good sci-fi book, but I have yet to read this.
#60
I finished War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy about a month ago... it was amazing.

I'm currently reading Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, which is good thus far
#62
Just started reading Stranger In A Strange Land.

It's great so far.
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#63
Currently reading Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk (guy who wrote Fight Club)
one ****ed up book.
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#64
Quote by samick007
I thought Catch 22 was horrible, but maybe it just takes a certain personality type to enjoy it.


It's got a weird sense of humour to it, but I personally found it hilarious. One of my favorites.

Quote by Zugunruhe
im reading timequake right now.

its my eleventh kurt vonnegut fiction book. i think theres only twenty or so, i gotta catch em all!

Awesome. I'm doing "Sirens of Titan" right now, and I think that's number eight or nine for me. "Timequake" is next on the list.

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At the moment im engrossed in Mark Z. Danielewski's 'House Of Leaves', its the most unique book I have ever read, its not normal at all. I highly suggest it to anyone that like abit of a challenge.

That one's pretty damn fantastic too.

Other stuff that may or may not have already been mentioned:
-"Flowers for Algernon," Daniel Keyes
-"Wuthering Heights," Bronte
-"The Stand," Stephen King
-"One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich," Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
-"The Gods Themselves," Isaac Asimov
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#65
Whoever said World War Z gets a cookie. I had no idea a book about zombies could be so jaw-droppingly good.

I'm reading Stephen Lawhead's 'Celtic Crusades' at the moment, I'm not particularly impressed so far but maybe it'll get better. I'm also re-reading Beckett's complete works for the gazillionth time.
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#66
Now im at home I can remember the rest of the books that I enjoyed, okay here goes;

Chuck Palahniuk - Survivor; In my opinion Chuck's best, far better than Fight club, haunted, choke and even invisible monsters (all of which are also good books). There is something about this book that made me not put it down, I read all of it within a couple days, when normally it takes me weeks to read books because I only normally read at night

William Golding - Lord of the flies; Classic, no need to say anymore

Anthony Burgess - a clockwork orange; I'll admit I thoroughly enjoyed the first half, and then it waned abit, but when I finnished reading it and looked back on it I realised how much I enjoyed it as a whole

John O'Farrell - May contain nuts; not a standard book that most people know, and its hardly litrature for the mind. Its quite a simple book and simply written, but I think it appeals to all ages with the issues it deals with and I honestly could say I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and learnt a lesson. And it was pretty humorous too.

Aldous Huxley - Overall superb book, but the ending seemed to not do justice to the rest of the book, still a classic though.

Orwell - 1984 - Same as above,

Irvine Welsh - Trainspotting; At first it was difficult with the language barrier (its written as spoken tongue in scottish accents, for example 'Hi! Whit's the fukin score? One guy in a black, purple and aqua shell-suite wi a flat-top asks.', now imagine it like that for every line. Once I got over that and got used to what meant what I was engrossed in the book.

Philip K. Dick - Do androids dream of electric sheep?; I don't know why I loved this book so much, there isnt anything I can look back on and think why I loved it, all I know is that I loved it and I read it within a couple days.


If your in to fantasy books, I highly suggest David Gemmell, especially the Rigante series and the Waylander series. Superb books, not the best written with huge descriptions etc, but it emerses you in to the book and has superb storylines.
#67
Quote by Mr. La Fritz

Then I'm going to read the major works of Oscar Wilde along with The Silmarillion, Notes From Undergound - Dostoevsky, Haunted - Palahniuk, The Metamorphosis - Kafka and Perfume Patrick Suskind.


If you mean Portrait of Dorian Gray, very good. Awesome book. The Silmarillion was excellent. I read it back when I was younger after being introduced to the whole LOTR craze, a lot heavier than the trilogy. I should probably read it again.

I loved The Metamorphosis. A little short, but the best out of anything I've read in the last year.
How I wish, how I wish
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THROAT
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Literature thread
#69
^On my list, heard way too many recommendations to NOT ignore it.
How I wish, how I wish
That the world, that the world
Had just one
THROAT
And my fingers were around it


Literature thread
#70
i just started invisible man by ralph ellison. pretty good so far

anybody in here read Jude the Obscure? my english teacher said it the most depressing book he ever read, which of course made me want to try it
#71
I love the entire Dirk Pitt series by Clive Cussler, not deep stuff, but entertaining.
I also really liked the biography of John Lennon, it's long as hell but worth it.

I am the King of Carrot Flowers

#72
Just read The Quiet Girl by Peter Hoeg. It was unbelievable.

Also, I am fond of recommending The Kingdoms Of Thorn And Bone by Greg Keyes. Amazing epic fantasy.

Magician by Raymond E. Fiest. It has been split into two books, Magician: Apprentice and Magician: Master and spawned multiple sequels, split into multiple sagas. Magician is now the first two books of the "Riftwar" saga. The sequels aren't as good, imo.

If you don't mind a slightly juvenile style, check out The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud. On top of all the things that make them good fantasy novels, the footnotes (yes, footnotes) are hilarious.

In a similar vein (minus the footnotes), the Artemis Fowl books by Eoin Colfer are very good too.


And if anyone wants to start reading Star Wars novels, PM me and I will start you off/guide you. Its too complicated to post.
Last edited by GettintheLedout at Jan 23, 2009,
#73
I'm currently reading The House Of God by Samuel Shem. It's a terrific book; if you want to learn more about the realities of hospitals, give it a geeze.
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#74
Without You, by Anthony Rapp. He was Mark in the original broadway/off-broadway production/movie Rent. It's his memoir. Although I don't generally like audiobooks, I would definitely recommend the audiobook over the book in this case. Anthony Rapp narrates it himself, and it is wonderful. If you're not a fan of Rent it won't mean much to you, but if you are a Rent-head like me, you MUST read/listen to this.
#75
Okay boys and girls, it looks like this thread is slowly dying...which is probably good considering what I'm about to suggest. I don't really read much but if I were to recommend anything I'd recommend The DaVinci Code (of course, it's good). Also,
Twilight
Dead serious. This one girl talked me into reading the first book. I finished it in three days and then proceeded to go out and buy the next three books. I finished the second and third books in two days each and the fourth in three. I'm sure if anybody else posts in this thread they will probably call me gay for this choice. I don't care. I LOVE these books.

....I also enjoyed Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
#76
Quote by cegs
i really liked this boys life by tobias wolff


Watch the movie version last night - Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert de Niro are brilliant in it. I've ordered the book via the net today.

My favourite book of 2008 was 'The Book Thief' by Markus Zusak.

So far in 2009 'Map of the Harbor Islands' by J G Hayes is my top book.
#77
Quote by hendris
Okay boys and girls, it looks like this thread is slowly dying...which is probably good considering what I'm about to suggest. I don't really read much but if I were to recommend anything I'd recommend The DaVinci Code (of course, it's good). Also,
Twilight
Dead serious. This one girl talked me into reading the first book. I finished it in three days and then proceeded to go out and buy the next three books. I finished the second and third books in two days each and the fourth in three. I'm sure if anybody else posts in this thread they will probably call me gay for this choice. I don't care. I LOVE these books.

....I also enjoyed Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton


Well..........I'll be nice. You're gay. That's as far as I'll take that.

Jurassic Park was good though.
How I wish, how I wish
That the world, that the world
Had just one
THROAT
And my fingers were around it


Literature thread
#78
Quote by Garret.
I intend to read Aldous Huxley's entire bibliography by the end of the year

wish me luck


He wrote good books, but he also seemed to have a really high opinion of himself lol.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#79
Oh by the way, I'm currently reading The Dark Tower. (I'm on the fourth, The Wizard and the Glass) Very good books so far. *spoiler* I love how in the first, it kinda builds up to a confrontation between The Man in Black and Roland, then all they do is talk. It seems boring, but is brilliant. The Man in Black was also secretly fighting Roland with his words, in my opinion. See what I've noticed is The Man in Black speaks in riddles (would have gotten along well with Blaine the Mono). See he speaks the truth but in a way where you believe a completely different thing. My favorite example is Tull. He technically spoke the truth by telling her she'll know what it's like being dead, but it will make her go crazy. *end spoiler*
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
#80
I've started reading James Joyce's Finnegans Wake, and I like it so far, though I'm only about 1/4 through.

The Picture of Dorian Gray was a really good book, as was Joyce's Ulysses.