#1
I listen to a lot of genres, but mainly classic rock/blues rock. I would love to be able to incoporate that influence into my songs, but whenever I write, it always comes out a bit poppy and annoying - the kind of thing I DON'T listen to

Any tips for getting some of that hard rockin' fire into my music?
#5
Quote by xMetalGodx
Black Sabbath did it, so why can't you?


and by that, I mean: They used blues scales and just broke away from the patterns. If something sounds to "pop" or "happy", just try going up or down a half step with some notes and it will sound heavier and/or more "evil" or "dark."
#6
don't play fall out boy-esque-ness
GEAR -
Gibson Les Paul VOS '57 gold top
ESP LTD MH-250NT
Vox AC15
#7
...And sometimes, you just can't use every style of music. I listen and play metal 90% of the time. The other 10% is 60's and 70's rock. Although I enjoy the 60's and 70's rock, its hard to take that influence and use it in my own metal riffs and songs. There have been a few occasions where I was able to tweak some stuff and turning them into nice metal riffs, but that doesn't happen often.

One option: Create songs for each genre you enjoy. If you can't combine them, it doesn't mean you can't play them or create songs from them.
#8
That's my problem though. I barely listen to ANY of the stuff I sound like, but I can't make the rest come out.

And I mean purely in terms of lyrics - I am getting better at rock riffs.

I tried to write a forced "blues" song, and it sounded terrible, really phoney.
#9
EDIT: ^Oh didn't read that. Sorry I can't help then, I'm not too good at lyrics. I'll leave my post anyway though.

You mean your riffs are poppy or your vocal melodies are poppy?

If your riffs are poppy, than thats fine, just as long as the vocal melodies remain the most important aspect of the song. Write your vocal melodies more interestingly, try to use more large steps instead of scale runs.

If your vocal melodies sound poppy, I'd suggest you develop them more. If you repeat a melodic lines, maybe repeat it higher? Or change a few notes. Or only repeat the most important bits, but repeat them twice (this makes the song a bit harder to write lyrically though).
Or you could invert all the melodic intervals. So if a song goes CDEGF you could repeat that but invert so it goes CBAFG. This is sort of rare outside classical music though.

Outright repeating a melodic line without developing it (aka, changing it) is fine but if you do this more than 3 times it's going to sound poppy and annoying. Think of those kids that only know the first line to a nursery rhyme and then they repeat it heaps and then you end up throttling them (I almost did that to my cousin)
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Jan 23, 2009,
#10
Quote by gabcd86
That's my problem though. I barely listen to ANY of the stuff I sound like, but I can't make the rest come out.

And I mean purely in terms of lyrics - I am getting better at rock riffs.

I tried to write a forced "blues" song, and it sounded terrible, really phoney.

Have a listening party, listen to all of your favorite stuff, and start listing the language that is centrally used in it.

Pick out the types of people, places, objects, and actions going on in those songs and make lists of each.

Next listen to the relationship between singer and subject in those songs--this is usually called mood (like the relationship between singer and listener is called tone)

Once you've done this, make a conscious effort to put those things into your songs--this is a good first step: good artists immitate, great artists steal.

If you'r ambitious, figure out how the words in your list relate to each other, come up with a good theory for that and you've now got a formula that you can use to come up with your own language for your songs.

Changing genres (lyrically) is a really complex process, it takes some immersion and some very conscious hard work--you'll real have to think about what exactly makes the songs you're currently making and what makes the songs you want to make. Sorry I can't give any easier advice to follow.
#11
Thanks you two, it sounds hard, but I think I need more in-depth advice than "listen to different music" :P

Cookies all round.