#1
I've been trying to record my riffs but It's too difficult. T.T ( I mean not the riff, recording is difficult)

I can easily play my riffs since I made it but when I'm recording I keep making small mistakes.

Is it only me who has this problem?
Last edited by hayan at Jan 22, 2009,
#2
No, it just that you get a little stage fright while recording, it happens to me and some people else. You will get over it sometime.
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#3
I get this for some reason. Its really annoying as usually i've practiced the riff / song to death and i know i can play it, but for some reason the pressure of having to play it perfectly makes me overthink everything and i make stupid mistakes.
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#4
nugiboy has it in one. Try recording constantly and play over an over again for several minutes, then using computer software or whatever you were using to record cut the best part. You'll probably find that without stopping to re-record you will probably get a perfect recording done much sooner this way.
#6
Quote by Bonorly
nugiboy has it in one. Try recording constantly and play over an over again for several minutes, then using computer software or whatever you were using to record cut the best part. You'll probably find that without stopping to re-record you will probably get a perfect recording done much sooner this way.


Thanks. I think this is a good idea as you forget your being recorded, and you can just cut out the run that sounds best instead of putting so much pressure on yourself to get it right straight away.
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#7
Thankss everyone for replying

I agree with Nugiboy. I deleted all my recording right away when I made mistakes

Thank you Bonorly

I'll try that.
#8
We all get that red light fear at times. The best thing to do is save all your glitched tracks and put them aside in a folder in your sequencer. You may be able to chop the tracks and use different parts after a while making one or two good tracks.

Also on good sequencers you can normally adjust pitch such as with Roland's V-Vocal editor. This is good if you hit the wrong note once or twice...
Last edited by moody07747 at Jan 22, 2009,
#9
I find it alot harder to record a good track to a "silent" background (meaning a click track or a drum track). a non-musical backing so to speak.

try laying out droning notes following the chord changes before recording the actual track. if it feels more musical it's usually easier to get into the right mindset.
#10
You don't truly know how well you can play a riff (or at all, for that matter) until you record. Once you record, you really hear every little nuance and every tiny scrape of a bad string you never noticed when playing.

Truly the best and most annoying way to become a cleaner guitar player.
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#11
you said something along the lines of 'i have to play it perfectly everytime'. if it's a recording you don't cos you can either edit the bit you messed up, or just do another take. i would relax and tell yourself that there's really no pressure
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#12
Ahh, man I think that the trouble can be caused by several reasons.
First of I have the same problem if I am recording a new riff that I just made, so naturally I wanna record it right away cause otherwise I forget it. As it is new, I am not used to it that much and I make small mistakes that I sometimes simply ignore due to the fact that I will recored it again later, but I just wanna remember it.
Second thing is the setup, if you are recording alone, you have to ensure that you have enough time to be ready to start playing after you push the REC button.
If you have to be to hasty to reach to your fretboard after pressing Record, you will most likely mess up the riff.
#13
That's why its so hard to be a good studio session player. I hate when I get thru the whole thing and make a stupid mistake right at the end.
#14
Quote by Tempoe
That's why its so hard to be a good studio session player. I hate when I get thru the whole thing and make a stupid mistake right at the end.

Oh God, that's the worst. Hate when it happens.
Play the riff blindfolded. Get someone else to record you.
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#15
A little editing skill can go a long way. It won't improve your guitar playing ability, but it will help recording. It's much easier to punch in a single note than rerecord an entire riff! With some software you can even record at a low bpm and speed it up to full tempo (very handy). Editing doesn't always work (ie, acoustic instruments, lots of sustain, complex harmonics and decay) but can be pretty much imperceptible with say, an electric guitar if done properly.
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