#1
Hi all, I recently acquired a fender highway 1 telecaster. i've played the **** out of it for three months and it's shown some slight signs of wear and tear, not nearly enough to qualify as relic but you get the point.

question: do fender guitars sound better when they age? or does their sound stay mostly the same? it would be really amazing if in 50 years i open a dusty case and see my realy old beat up fender telceaster in it, and plug in, and have it sound just as sweet as it did when i first got it

who else here thinks a beat up fender guitar looks better than a brand spanking new one?
#2
i have had a mia strat for 20 years now, bought it new, and i swear it sounds sweeter now than when i bought it.

mind you, i play a lot better now than i did 20 years ago and it's had texas special pups installed so i suppose it should do really.
I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.
- Jimi Hendrix
#3
I don't quite like the artificial aging of beating up guitars .. I just like the aging like the finish "fading" but that's just me
#4
Yes, all guitars (that are made of good wood and not plywood) sound better with age. Yes, if you open your case in half a century and your guitar's not disintegrated, it will play fine and sound great, though it will def. need new strings.
#5
well they do say that guitars get better with age, i just got me an 08 MIA strat and the way it is right now i wouldnt change a single thing about the way it plays, id be happy as hell if it was like amazing decades down the line
2008 M.I.A. HSS Strat
Marshall JCM 900 50w Dual Reverb
#6
Quote by Danno13
Yes, all guitars (that are made of good wood and not plywood) sound better with age. Yes, if you open your case in half a century and your guitar's not disintegrated, it will play fine and sound great, though it will def. need new strings.

actually, if you leave it in its case unplayed for 50 years it will probably have a negative impact on tone. Keep the wood resonating as much as you can, and it will age in a way that allows it to resonate better, as opposed to aging in a stiff, 'motionless' state.

This is why we should kill collectors who buy their guitars just to increase the resale value - they increase the value, but neglect the instrument itself.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#7
Some guitars sound better and some sound worse over time. But yes, guitars sound "different" over time due to the break down of the materials in it (wood, glue, finish). Years of smoothing out the bridge and nut with the strings can attribute to pleasant subtle sound differences as well. Beating up your guitar won't make it sound better. If you sand down your new guitar to make it look like you've been playing for 35 years you might dry out the wood especially mahogany. I do like the "relic" look though, don't get me wrong.
#8
Those HWY1 Fender's beat up really nice. The wood is able to breathe better when the paint wears thin, ontop of the HWY1's already thin nitro finish!
Gibson Les Paul Studio(Wine Red)
Squier Vintage Modified Tele(White)
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